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Antibacterial and antifungal compounds from marine fungi.

Xu L, Meng W, Cao C, Wang J, Shan W, Wang Q - Mar Drugs (2015)

Bottom Line: This paper reviews 116 new compounds with antifungal or antibacterial activities as well as 169 other known antimicrobial compounds, with a specific focus on January 2010 through March 2015.Furthermore, the phylogeny of the fungi producing these antibacterial or antifungal compounds was analyzed.The new methods used to isolate marine fungi that possess antibacterial or antifungal activities as well as the relationship between structure and activity are shown in this review.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: College of Agricultural Resource and Environment, Heilongjiang University, Harbin 150080, China. xulijian@hlju.edu.cn.

ABSTRACT
This paper reviews 116 new compounds with antifungal or antibacterial activities as well as 169 other known antimicrobial compounds, with a specific focus on January 2010 through March 2015. Furthermore, the phylogeny of the fungi producing these antibacterial or antifungal compounds was analyzed. The new methods used to isolate marine fungi that possess antibacterial or antifungal activities as well as the relationship between structure and activity are shown in this review.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Structures of compound 31–39 (the red moiety enhances the antimicrobial activity).
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marinedrugs-13-03479-f009: Structures of compound 31–39 (the red moiety enhances the antimicrobial activity).

Mentions: The structures of compound 31–39 were shown in Figure 9. Compound 31 was only produced by A. flocculosus PT05-1 under high salt stress conditions and showed antibacterial activity against E. aerogenes (MIC, 3.7 μM) [33]. Compound 32 was elucidated to be 4′-methoxyl-asperphenamate and was isolated from A. elegans ZJ-2008010. It showed a similar activity as asperphenamate against S. epidermis (MIC, 10 μM) [34]. Terremide A (33) was isolated from A. terreus PT06-2 and showed weak activity against S. aureus (MIC, 63.9 μM) [29]. Two cerebrosides, flavuside A (34) and flavuside B (35), were isolated from A. flavus. They exhibited 15.6 and 31.2 μg/mL MICs for S. aureus and MRSA [35]. Compound 36 was isolated from Paecilomyces sp. and exhibited weak activity against MRSA [36]. Trichoderin A (37), trichoderin A1 (38) and trichoderin B (39) were isolated from fungal strain 05FI48 and they exhibited potent antibacterial activity against M. smegmatis, M. bovis BBG and M. tuberculosis H37Rv (MIC, 0.1, 0.02 and 0.12 μg/mL for 37; 1.56, 0.16 and 2.0 μg/mL for 38; 0.63, 0.02 and 0.13 μg/mL for 39) [37,38]. Based on the comparison of the structures and activities of 37–39, the R1 hydroxyls (the red moiety shown in the structure 37 and 39) of 37 and 39 are related to their antibacterial activity. The mechanism of 37 was investigated using a transformant of M. smegmatis with resistance to 37. This M. smegmatis transformant over-expressed part of the genes that encoded the mycobacterial ATP synthase, indicating that the anti-mycobacterial activity of 37–39 is related to the inhibition of ATP synthesis.


Antibacterial and antifungal compounds from marine fungi.

Xu L, Meng W, Cao C, Wang J, Shan W, Wang Q - Mar Drugs (2015)

Structures of compound 31–39 (the red moiety enhances the antimicrobial activity).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4483641&req=5

marinedrugs-13-03479-f009: Structures of compound 31–39 (the red moiety enhances the antimicrobial activity).
Mentions: The structures of compound 31–39 were shown in Figure 9. Compound 31 was only produced by A. flocculosus PT05-1 under high salt stress conditions and showed antibacterial activity against E. aerogenes (MIC, 3.7 μM) [33]. Compound 32 was elucidated to be 4′-methoxyl-asperphenamate and was isolated from A. elegans ZJ-2008010. It showed a similar activity as asperphenamate against S. epidermis (MIC, 10 μM) [34]. Terremide A (33) was isolated from A. terreus PT06-2 and showed weak activity against S. aureus (MIC, 63.9 μM) [29]. Two cerebrosides, flavuside A (34) and flavuside B (35), were isolated from A. flavus. They exhibited 15.6 and 31.2 μg/mL MICs for S. aureus and MRSA [35]. Compound 36 was isolated from Paecilomyces sp. and exhibited weak activity against MRSA [36]. Trichoderin A (37), trichoderin A1 (38) and trichoderin B (39) were isolated from fungal strain 05FI48 and they exhibited potent antibacterial activity against M. smegmatis, M. bovis BBG and M. tuberculosis H37Rv (MIC, 0.1, 0.02 and 0.12 μg/mL for 37; 1.56, 0.16 and 2.0 μg/mL for 38; 0.63, 0.02 and 0.13 μg/mL for 39) [37,38]. Based on the comparison of the structures and activities of 37–39, the R1 hydroxyls (the red moiety shown in the structure 37 and 39) of 37 and 39 are related to their antibacterial activity. The mechanism of 37 was investigated using a transformant of M. smegmatis with resistance to 37. This M. smegmatis transformant over-expressed part of the genes that encoded the mycobacterial ATP synthase, indicating that the anti-mycobacterial activity of 37–39 is related to the inhibition of ATP synthesis.

Bottom Line: This paper reviews 116 new compounds with antifungal or antibacterial activities as well as 169 other known antimicrobial compounds, with a specific focus on January 2010 through March 2015.Furthermore, the phylogeny of the fungi producing these antibacterial or antifungal compounds was analyzed.The new methods used to isolate marine fungi that possess antibacterial or antifungal activities as well as the relationship between structure and activity are shown in this review.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: College of Agricultural Resource and Environment, Heilongjiang University, Harbin 150080, China. xulijian@hlju.edu.cn.

ABSTRACT
This paper reviews 116 new compounds with antifungal or antibacterial activities as well as 169 other known antimicrobial compounds, with a specific focus on January 2010 through March 2015. Furthermore, the phylogeny of the fungi producing these antibacterial or antifungal compounds was analyzed. The new methods used to isolate marine fungi that possess antibacterial or antifungal activities as well as the relationship between structure and activity are shown in this review.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus