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Biological Properties of Fucoxanthin in Oil Recovered from Two Brown Seaweeds Using Supercritical CO2 Extraction.

Sivagnanam SP, Yin S, Choi JH, Park YB, Woo HC, Chun BS - Mar Drugs (2015)

Bottom Line: The obtained oil from the brown seaweeds was analyzed to determine their valuable compounds such as fatty acids, phenolic compounds, fucoxanthin and biological properties including antioxidant, antimicrobial, and antihypertension effects.The amounts of fucoxanthin extracted from the SC-CO2 oils of S. japonica and S. horneri were 0.41 ± 0.05 and 0.77 ± 0.07 mg/g, respectively.The acetone-methanol mix extracts exhibited better antimicrobial activities than those obtained by other means.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Food Science and Technology, Pukyong National University, 45 Yongso-ro, Nam-gu, Busan 608-737, Korea. saravana_ps@pknu.ac.kr.

ABSTRACT
The bioactive materials in brown seaweeds hold great interest for developing new drugs and healthy foods. The oil content in brown seaweeds (Saccharina japonica and Sargassum horneri) was extracted by using environmentally friendly supercritical CO2 (SC-CO2) with ethanol as a co-solvent in a semi-batch flow extraction process and compared the results with a conventional extraction process using hexane, ethanol, and acetone mixed with methanol (1:1, v/v). The SC-CO2 method was used at a temperature of 45 °C and pressure of 250 bar. The flow rate of CO2 (27 g/min) was constant for the entire extraction period of 2 h. The obtained oil from the brown seaweeds was analyzed to determine their valuable compounds such as fatty acids, phenolic compounds, fucoxanthin and biological properties including antioxidant, antimicrobial, and antihypertension effects. The amounts of fucoxanthin extracted from the SC-CO2 oils of S. japonica and S. horneri were 0.41 ± 0.05 and 0.77 ± 0.07 mg/g, respectively. High antihypertensive activity was detected when using mixed acetone and methanol, whereas the phenolic content and antioxidant property were higher in the oil extracted by SC-CO2. The acetone-methanol mix extracts exhibited better antimicrobial activities than those obtained by other means. Thus, the SC-CO2 extraction process appears to be a good method for obtaining valuable compounds from both brown seaweeds, and showed stronger biological activity than that obtained by the conventional extraction process.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

HPLC chromatogram of fucoxanthin content in S. japonica (SC-CO2 + ethanol) and S. horneri (SC-CO2 + ethanol) extracts.
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marinedrugs-13-03422-f001: HPLC chromatogram of fucoxanthin content in S. japonica (SC-CO2 + ethanol) and S. horneri (SC-CO2 + ethanol) extracts.

Mentions: The fucoxanthin contents in the brown seaweeds extracted by the various methods are shown in Table 1. The extracted oil from S. horneri by using SC-CO2 showed the highest content 0.77 ± 0.07 mg/g, followed by 0.71 ± 0.05 mg/g in the acetone–methanol extract. Moreover, the fucoxanthin in the S. japonica oil extracted by acetone–methanol, 0.48 ± 0.10 mg/g, was higher than that by SC-CO2 at 0.41 ± 0.05 mg/g. These results show that the SC-CO2 process can extract a similar content of fucoxanthin as when a solvent is used (Figure 1 and Supplementary Figure S1). A previous report on the fucoxanthin content in S. horneri noted 11.24 mg/g in methanol extract [21], and another reported 3.7 ± 1.6 mg/g DW in seaweed by using the same process [16]. In a third report, the fucoxanthin content in S. japonica by using ethanol was reported as 18.7 mg/100 g fresh weight [22]. Conde et al. [15] reported that 12 mg/100 g in S. muticum (SC-CO2 with 10% ethanol). The content of fucoxanthin was reported to vary significantly with season and life cycle of the algae, peaking between the winter and spring (mature phase of sporophyte) and lowest during summer (senescence phase) [16].


Biological Properties of Fucoxanthin in Oil Recovered from Two Brown Seaweeds Using Supercritical CO2 Extraction.

Sivagnanam SP, Yin S, Choi JH, Park YB, Woo HC, Chun BS - Mar Drugs (2015)

HPLC chromatogram of fucoxanthin content in S. japonica (SC-CO2 + ethanol) and S. horneri (SC-CO2 + ethanol) extracts.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4483637&req=5

marinedrugs-13-03422-f001: HPLC chromatogram of fucoxanthin content in S. japonica (SC-CO2 + ethanol) and S. horneri (SC-CO2 + ethanol) extracts.
Mentions: The fucoxanthin contents in the brown seaweeds extracted by the various methods are shown in Table 1. The extracted oil from S. horneri by using SC-CO2 showed the highest content 0.77 ± 0.07 mg/g, followed by 0.71 ± 0.05 mg/g in the acetone–methanol extract. Moreover, the fucoxanthin in the S. japonica oil extracted by acetone–methanol, 0.48 ± 0.10 mg/g, was higher than that by SC-CO2 at 0.41 ± 0.05 mg/g. These results show that the SC-CO2 process can extract a similar content of fucoxanthin as when a solvent is used (Figure 1 and Supplementary Figure S1). A previous report on the fucoxanthin content in S. horneri noted 11.24 mg/g in methanol extract [21], and another reported 3.7 ± 1.6 mg/g DW in seaweed by using the same process [16]. In a third report, the fucoxanthin content in S. japonica by using ethanol was reported as 18.7 mg/100 g fresh weight [22]. Conde et al. [15] reported that 12 mg/100 g in S. muticum (SC-CO2 with 10% ethanol). The content of fucoxanthin was reported to vary significantly with season and life cycle of the algae, peaking between the winter and spring (mature phase of sporophyte) and lowest during summer (senescence phase) [16].

Bottom Line: The obtained oil from the brown seaweeds was analyzed to determine their valuable compounds such as fatty acids, phenolic compounds, fucoxanthin and biological properties including antioxidant, antimicrobial, and antihypertension effects.The amounts of fucoxanthin extracted from the SC-CO2 oils of S. japonica and S. horneri were 0.41 ± 0.05 and 0.77 ± 0.07 mg/g, respectively.The acetone-methanol mix extracts exhibited better antimicrobial activities than those obtained by other means.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Food Science and Technology, Pukyong National University, 45 Yongso-ro, Nam-gu, Busan 608-737, Korea. saravana_ps@pknu.ac.kr.

ABSTRACT
The bioactive materials in brown seaweeds hold great interest for developing new drugs and healthy foods. The oil content in brown seaweeds (Saccharina japonica and Sargassum horneri) was extracted by using environmentally friendly supercritical CO2 (SC-CO2) with ethanol as a co-solvent in a semi-batch flow extraction process and compared the results with a conventional extraction process using hexane, ethanol, and acetone mixed with methanol (1:1, v/v). The SC-CO2 method was used at a temperature of 45 °C and pressure of 250 bar. The flow rate of CO2 (27 g/min) was constant for the entire extraction period of 2 h. The obtained oil from the brown seaweeds was analyzed to determine their valuable compounds such as fatty acids, phenolic compounds, fucoxanthin and biological properties including antioxidant, antimicrobial, and antihypertension effects. The amounts of fucoxanthin extracted from the SC-CO2 oils of S. japonica and S. horneri were 0.41 ± 0.05 and 0.77 ± 0.07 mg/g, respectively. High antihypertensive activity was detected when using mixed acetone and methanol, whereas the phenolic content and antioxidant property were higher in the oil extracted by SC-CO2. The acetone-methanol mix extracts exhibited better antimicrobial activities than those obtained by other means. Thus, the SC-CO2 extraction process appears to be a good method for obtaining valuable compounds from both brown seaweeds, and showed stronger biological activity than that obtained by the conventional extraction process.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus