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Characterization of mandibular molar root and canal morphology using cone beam computed tomography and its variability in Belgian and Chilean population samples.

Torres A, Jacobs R, Lambrechts P, Brizuela C, Cabrera C, Concha G, Pedemonte ME - Imaging Sci Dent (2015)

Bottom Line: We analyzed the CBCT images of 515 mandibular molars (257 from Belgium and 258 from Chile).The most common configurations in the mesial root of both molars were type V and type III.Curvature in the cross-sectional image was found in 25% of the distal canals of the mandibular first molars in the Belgian population, compared to 11% in the Chilean population.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Imaging and Pathology, OMFS-IMPATH Research Group, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Leuven, Belgium.

ABSTRACT

Purpose: This study used cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) to characterize mandibular molar root and canal morphology and its variability in Belgian and Chilean population samples.

Materials and methods: We analyzed the CBCT images of 515 mandibular molars (257 from Belgium and 258 from Chile). Molars meeting the inclusion criteria were analyzed to determine (1) the number of roots; (2) the root canal configuration; (3) the presence of a curved canal in the cross-sectional image of the distal root in the mandibular first molar and (4) the presence of a C-shaped canal in the second mandibular molar. A descriptive analysis was performed. The association between national origin and the presence of a curved or C-shaped canal was evaluated using the chi-squared test.

Results: The most common configurations in the mesial root of both molars were type V and type III. In the distal root, type I canal configuration was the most common. Curvature in the cross-sectional image was found in 25% of the distal canals of the mandibular first molars in the Belgian population, compared to 11% in the Chilean population. The prevalence of C-shaped canals was 10% or less in both populations.

Conclusion: In cases of unclear or complex root and canal morphology in the mandibular molars, CBCT imaging might assist endodontic specialists in making an accurate diagnosis and in treatment planning.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Curved canal in the cross-sectional image of the distal root in the mandibular first molar. A. Left: a mandibular first molar with (M) mesial and (D) distal roots. Right: cross-sectional image of a mandibular first molar as seen in an axial-plane CBCT view. (M) mesial root, (D) distal root, (*), cortical and trabecular bone structure. When a straight line is drawn in the distal ribbon-shaped canal, it only comes in contact with the (a) buccal and (b) lingual ends of the canal. B. Cone-beam computed tomography cross-sectional images. 1a-c: curved distal canals in cross-sectional images, 1d: an oval canal, 2a and b: curved distal canals in cross-sectional images, 2c: a canal starting to divide, 2d: a fully divided canal, 3a-d: the absence of a curved distal canal in cross-sectional images.
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Figure 2: Curved canal in the cross-sectional image of the distal root in the mandibular first molar. A. Left: a mandibular first molar with (M) mesial and (D) distal roots. Right: cross-sectional image of a mandibular first molar as seen in an axial-plane CBCT view. (M) mesial root, (D) distal root, (*), cortical and trabecular bone structure. When a straight line is drawn in the distal ribbon-shaped canal, it only comes in contact with the (a) buccal and (b) lingual ends of the canal. B. Cone-beam computed tomography cross-sectional images. 1a-c: curved distal canals in cross-sectional images, 1d: an oval canal, 2a and b: curved distal canals in cross-sectional images, 2c: a canal starting to divide, 2d: a fully divided canal, 3a-d: the absence of a curved distal canal in cross-sectional images.

Mentions: In the mandibular first molars, a curved distal canal was only recorded in the distal root when the canal exhibited the following features in a cross-sectional image (Fig. 2): (1) the presence of a ribbon-shaped canal with (2) a curved shape, as verified by the ability to draw a straight line intersecting only the ends of the buccal and lingual sides of the canal.


Characterization of mandibular molar root and canal morphology using cone beam computed tomography and its variability in Belgian and Chilean population samples.

Torres A, Jacobs R, Lambrechts P, Brizuela C, Cabrera C, Concha G, Pedemonte ME - Imaging Sci Dent (2015)

Curved canal in the cross-sectional image of the distal root in the mandibular first molar. A. Left: a mandibular first molar with (M) mesial and (D) distal roots. Right: cross-sectional image of a mandibular first molar as seen in an axial-plane CBCT view. (M) mesial root, (D) distal root, (*), cortical and trabecular bone structure. When a straight line is drawn in the distal ribbon-shaped canal, it only comes in contact with the (a) buccal and (b) lingual ends of the canal. B. Cone-beam computed tomography cross-sectional images. 1a-c: curved distal canals in cross-sectional images, 1d: an oval canal, 2a and b: curved distal canals in cross-sectional images, 2c: a canal starting to divide, 2d: a fully divided canal, 3a-d: the absence of a curved distal canal in cross-sectional images.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4483626&req=5

Figure 2: Curved canal in the cross-sectional image of the distal root in the mandibular first molar. A. Left: a mandibular first molar with (M) mesial and (D) distal roots. Right: cross-sectional image of a mandibular first molar as seen in an axial-plane CBCT view. (M) mesial root, (D) distal root, (*), cortical and trabecular bone structure. When a straight line is drawn in the distal ribbon-shaped canal, it only comes in contact with the (a) buccal and (b) lingual ends of the canal. B. Cone-beam computed tomography cross-sectional images. 1a-c: curved distal canals in cross-sectional images, 1d: an oval canal, 2a and b: curved distal canals in cross-sectional images, 2c: a canal starting to divide, 2d: a fully divided canal, 3a-d: the absence of a curved distal canal in cross-sectional images.
Mentions: In the mandibular first molars, a curved distal canal was only recorded in the distal root when the canal exhibited the following features in a cross-sectional image (Fig. 2): (1) the presence of a ribbon-shaped canal with (2) a curved shape, as verified by the ability to draw a straight line intersecting only the ends of the buccal and lingual sides of the canal.

Bottom Line: We analyzed the CBCT images of 515 mandibular molars (257 from Belgium and 258 from Chile).The most common configurations in the mesial root of both molars were type V and type III.Curvature in the cross-sectional image was found in 25% of the distal canals of the mandibular first molars in the Belgian population, compared to 11% in the Chilean population.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Imaging and Pathology, OMFS-IMPATH Research Group, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Leuven, Belgium.

ABSTRACT

Purpose: This study used cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) to characterize mandibular molar root and canal morphology and its variability in Belgian and Chilean population samples.

Materials and methods: We analyzed the CBCT images of 515 mandibular molars (257 from Belgium and 258 from Chile). Molars meeting the inclusion criteria were analyzed to determine (1) the number of roots; (2) the root canal configuration; (3) the presence of a curved canal in the cross-sectional image of the distal root in the mandibular first molar and (4) the presence of a C-shaped canal in the second mandibular molar. A descriptive analysis was performed. The association between national origin and the presence of a curved or C-shaped canal was evaluated using the chi-squared test.

Results: The most common configurations in the mesial root of both molars were type V and type III. In the distal root, type I canal configuration was the most common. Curvature in the cross-sectional image was found in 25% of the distal canals of the mandibular first molars in the Belgian population, compared to 11% in the Chilean population. The prevalence of C-shaped canals was 10% or less in both populations.

Conclusion: In cases of unclear or complex root and canal morphology in the mandibular molars, CBCT imaging might assist endodontic specialists in making an accurate diagnosis and in treatment planning.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus