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The current approach to the diagnosis of vascular anomalies of the head and neck: A pictorial essay.

Goel S, Gupta S, Singh A, Prakash A, Ghosh S, Narang P, Gupta S - Imaging Sci Dent (2015)

Bottom Line: Because all hemangiomas were previously considered to involute, if a lesion with imaging and clinical characteristics of hemangioma does not involute, then there is no subclass in which to classify such a lesion, as reported in one of our cases.The recent classification proposed by the International Society for the Study of Vascular Anomalies (ISSVA, 2014) has solved this problem by including non-involuting and partially involuting hemangioma in the classification.We present here five cases of vascular anomalies and discuss their diagnosis in accordance with the ISSVA (2014) classification.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Oral Medicine and Radiology, Maulana Azad Institute of Dental Sciences, Delhi, India.

ABSTRACT
Throughout the years, various classifications have evolved for the diagnosis of vascular anomalies. However, it remains difficult to classify a number of such lesions. Because all hemangiomas were previously considered to involute, if a lesion with imaging and clinical characteristics of hemangioma does not involute, then there is no subclass in which to classify such a lesion, as reported in one of our cases. The recent classification proposed by the International Society for the Study of Vascular Anomalies (ISSVA, 2014) has solved this problem by including non-involuting and partially involuting hemangioma in the classification. We present here five cases of vascular anomalies and discuss their diagnosis in accordance with the ISSVA (2014) classification. A non-involuting lesion should not always be diagnosed as a vascular malformation. A non-involuting lesion can be either a hemangioma or a vascular malformation depending upon its clinicopathologic and imaging characteristics.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

A. A frontal contrast-enhanced computed tomographic (CECT) image of high-flow vascular malformation shows unusual presence of two separate lesions on the same side of the face. A tangle of serpiginous vessels are present in relation to the anterior belly of the digastric muscle and submandibular space on the left side. B. A coronal CECT image shows the lesion in the relation to the left sternocleidomastoid muscle. C. An axial CECT image shows the lesion in the relation to the posterior aspect of the superficial lobe of the left parotid gland. D and E. Doppler ultrasonography images show tortuous dilated vessels in the substance of the anterior belly of the digastric muscle with color flow within showing the arterial pattern. F. A Doppler ultrasonography image shows tortuous vessels in relation to the parotid gland, showing color flow within and the arterial pattern of flow.
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Figure 5: A. A frontal contrast-enhanced computed tomographic (CECT) image of high-flow vascular malformation shows unusual presence of two separate lesions on the same side of the face. A tangle of serpiginous vessels are present in relation to the anterior belly of the digastric muscle and submandibular space on the left side. B. A coronal CECT image shows the lesion in the relation to the left sternocleidomastoid muscle. C. An axial CECT image shows the lesion in the relation to the posterior aspect of the superficial lobe of the left parotid gland. D and E. Doppler ultrasonography images show tortuous dilated vessels in the substance of the anterior belly of the digastric muscle with color flow within showing the arterial pattern. F. A Doppler ultrasonography image shows tortuous vessels in relation to the parotid gland, showing color flow within and the arterial pattern of flow.

Mentions: A 35-year-old male patient reported with a swelling in the left submandibular and parotid region that had been present since birth and was firm on palpation with a higher surface temperature than the surrounding region. CECT images revealed multiple serpentine dilated channels in the left submandibular and parotid regions with extension into the post-auricular region suggestive of the unusual presence of two separate vascular lesions (Figs. 5A-C). Doppler USG was suggestive of high-flow arteriovenous malformation (Figs. 5D-F).


The current approach to the diagnosis of vascular anomalies of the head and neck: A pictorial essay.

Goel S, Gupta S, Singh A, Prakash A, Ghosh S, Narang P, Gupta S - Imaging Sci Dent (2015)

A. A frontal contrast-enhanced computed tomographic (CECT) image of high-flow vascular malformation shows unusual presence of two separate lesions on the same side of the face. A tangle of serpiginous vessels are present in relation to the anterior belly of the digastric muscle and submandibular space on the left side. B. A coronal CECT image shows the lesion in the relation to the left sternocleidomastoid muscle. C. An axial CECT image shows the lesion in the relation to the posterior aspect of the superficial lobe of the left parotid gland. D and E. Doppler ultrasonography images show tortuous dilated vessels in the substance of the anterior belly of the digastric muscle with color flow within showing the arterial pattern. F. A Doppler ultrasonography image shows tortuous vessels in relation to the parotid gland, showing color flow within and the arterial pattern of flow.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4483619&req=5

Figure 5: A. A frontal contrast-enhanced computed tomographic (CECT) image of high-flow vascular malformation shows unusual presence of two separate lesions on the same side of the face. A tangle of serpiginous vessels are present in relation to the anterior belly of the digastric muscle and submandibular space on the left side. B. A coronal CECT image shows the lesion in the relation to the left sternocleidomastoid muscle. C. An axial CECT image shows the lesion in the relation to the posterior aspect of the superficial lobe of the left parotid gland. D and E. Doppler ultrasonography images show tortuous dilated vessels in the substance of the anterior belly of the digastric muscle with color flow within showing the arterial pattern. F. A Doppler ultrasonography image shows tortuous vessels in relation to the parotid gland, showing color flow within and the arterial pattern of flow.
Mentions: A 35-year-old male patient reported with a swelling in the left submandibular and parotid region that had been present since birth and was firm on palpation with a higher surface temperature than the surrounding region. CECT images revealed multiple serpentine dilated channels in the left submandibular and parotid regions with extension into the post-auricular region suggestive of the unusual presence of two separate vascular lesions (Figs. 5A-C). Doppler USG was suggestive of high-flow arteriovenous malformation (Figs. 5D-F).

Bottom Line: Because all hemangiomas were previously considered to involute, if a lesion with imaging and clinical characteristics of hemangioma does not involute, then there is no subclass in which to classify such a lesion, as reported in one of our cases.The recent classification proposed by the International Society for the Study of Vascular Anomalies (ISSVA, 2014) has solved this problem by including non-involuting and partially involuting hemangioma in the classification.We present here five cases of vascular anomalies and discuss their diagnosis in accordance with the ISSVA (2014) classification.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Oral Medicine and Radiology, Maulana Azad Institute of Dental Sciences, Delhi, India.

ABSTRACT
Throughout the years, various classifications have evolved for the diagnosis of vascular anomalies. However, it remains difficult to classify a number of such lesions. Because all hemangiomas were previously considered to involute, if a lesion with imaging and clinical characteristics of hemangioma does not involute, then there is no subclass in which to classify such a lesion, as reported in one of our cases. The recent classification proposed by the International Society for the Study of Vascular Anomalies (ISSVA, 2014) has solved this problem by including non-involuting and partially involuting hemangioma in the classification. We present here five cases of vascular anomalies and discuss their diagnosis in accordance with the ISSVA (2014) classification. A non-involuting lesion should not always be diagnosed as a vascular malformation. A non-involuting lesion can be either a hemangioma or a vascular malformation depending upon its clinicopathologic and imaging characteristics.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus