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Differences in the Faecal Microbiome in Schistosoma haematobium Infected Children vs. Uninfected Children.

Kay GL, Millard A, Sergeant MJ, Midzi N, Gwisai R, Mduluza T, Ivens A, Nausch N, Mutapi F, Pallen M - PLoS Negl Trop Dis (2015)

Bottom Line: Some OTUs including Veillonella, Streptococcus, Bacteroides and Helicobacter were more abundant in children ≤ 1 year old compared to older children.PZQ treatment did not alter the microbiome structure in infected or uninfected children from that observed at baseline.There are significant differences in the gut microbiome structure of infected vs. uninfected children and the differences were refractory to PZQ treatment.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Microbiology and Infection Unit, Division of Translational and Systems Medicine, Warwick Medical School, University of Warwick, Gibbet Hill Campus, Coventry, West Midlands, United Kingdom.

ABSTRACT

Background: Several infectious diseases and therapeutic interventions cause gut microbe dysbiosis and associated pathology. We characterised the gut microbiome of children exposed to the helminth Schistosoma haematobium pre- and post-treatment with the drug praziquantel (PZQ), with the aim to compare the gut microbiome structure (abundance and diversity) in schistosome infected vs. uninfected children.

Methods: Stool DNA from 139 children aged six months to 13 years old; with S. haematobium infection prevalence of 27.34% was extracted at baseline. 12 weeks following antihelminthic treatment with praziqunatel, stool DNA was collected from 62 of the 139 children. The 16S rRNA genes were sequenced from the baseline and post-treatment samples and the sequence data, clustered into operational taxonomic units (OTUs). The OTU data were analysed using multivariate analyses and paired T-test.

Results: Pre-treatment, the most abundant phyla were Bacteroidetes, followed by Firmicutes and Proteobacteria respectively. The relative abundance of taxa among bacterial classes showed limited variation by age group or sex and the bacterial communities had similar overall compositions. Although there were no overall differences in the microbiome structure across the whole age range, the abundance of 21 OTUs varied significantly with age (FDR<0.05). Some OTUs including Veillonella, Streptococcus, Bacteroides and Helicobacter were more abundant in children ≤ 1 year old compared to older children. Furthermore, the gut microbiome differed in schistosome infected vs. uninfected children with 27 OTU occurring in infected but not uninfected children, for 5 of these all Prevotella, the difference was statistically significant (p <0.05) with FDR <0.05. PZQ treatment did not alter the microbiome structure in infected or uninfected children from that observed at baseline.

Conclusions: There are significant differences in the gut microbiome structure of infected vs. uninfected children and the differences were refractory to PZQ treatment.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The relative abundance of bacterial classes within the human gut microbiome separated into A) age range, B) sex, C) infection status.
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Related In: Results  -  Collection

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getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4482744&req=5

pntd.0003861.g001: The relative abundance of bacterial classes within the human gut microbiome separated into A) age range, B) sex, C) infection status.

Mentions: Pre-treatment samples were analysed as a separate data set. After filtering and denoising10,722,905 sequences underwent additional analysis (77,143 mean sequences/sample). The data were analysed to determined differences with age group and sex. The relative abundance of taxa among bacterial classes showed limited variation by age group or sex (Fig 1A and 1B). Across all age groups and both sexes, the most abundant phyla observed was Bacteroidetes, followed by Firmicutes, with the least abundant being the Proteobacteria (Table 1). Plots of the first and third principal coordinates showed minimal variation between sex and the first two principal coordinates showed minimal variation between age groups suggesting the presence of communities with similar overall compositions (Fig 2A and 2B). Nonetheless, the abundance of 21 OTUs did differ significantly between age groups (S2 Table). OTU703 (Prevotella copri) was present in all age ranges except up to one year. A number of assigned OTUs had a higher abundance before one year compared to all other age ranges, including Veillonella, Streptococcus, Bacteroides and Helicobacter.


Differences in the Faecal Microbiome in Schistosoma haematobium Infected Children vs. Uninfected Children.

Kay GL, Millard A, Sergeant MJ, Midzi N, Gwisai R, Mduluza T, Ivens A, Nausch N, Mutapi F, Pallen M - PLoS Negl Trop Dis (2015)

The relative abundance of bacterial classes within the human gut microbiome separated into A) age range, B) sex, C) infection status.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4482744&req=5

pntd.0003861.g001: The relative abundance of bacterial classes within the human gut microbiome separated into A) age range, B) sex, C) infection status.
Mentions: Pre-treatment samples were analysed as a separate data set. After filtering and denoising10,722,905 sequences underwent additional analysis (77,143 mean sequences/sample). The data were analysed to determined differences with age group and sex. The relative abundance of taxa among bacterial classes showed limited variation by age group or sex (Fig 1A and 1B). Across all age groups and both sexes, the most abundant phyla observed was Bacteroidetes, followed by Firmicutes, with the least abundant being the Proteobacteria (Table 1). Plots of the first and third principal coordinates showed minimal variation between sex and the first two principal coordinates showed minimal variation between age groups suggesting the presence of communities with similar overall compositions (Fig 2A and 2B). Nonetheless, the abundance of 21 OTUs did differ significantly between age groups (S2 Table). OTU703 (Prevotella copri) was present in all age ranges except up to one year. A number of assigned OTUs had a higher abundance before one year compared to all other age ranges, including Veillonella, Streptococcus, Bacteroides and Helicobacter.

Bottom Line: Some OTUs including Veillonella, Streptococcus, Bacteroides and Helicobacter were more abundant in children ≤ 1 year old compared to older children.PZQ treatment did not alter the microbiome structure in infected or uninfected children from that observed at baseline.There are significant differences in the gut microbiome structure of infected vs. uninfected children and the differences were refractory to PZQ treatment.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Microbiology and Infection Unit, Division of Translational and Systems Medicine, Warwick Medical School, University of Warwick, Gibbet Hill Campus, Coventry, West Midlands, United Kingdom.

ABSTRACT

Background: Several infectious diseases and therapeutic interventions cause gut microbe dysbiosis and associated pathology. We characterised the gut microbiome of children exposed to the helminth Schistosoma haematobium pre- and post-treatment with the drug praziquantel (PZQ), with the aim to compare the gut microbiome structure (abundance and diversity) in schistosome infected vs. uninfected children.

Methods: Stool DNA from 139 children aged six months to 13 years old; with S. haematobium infection prevalence of 27.34% was extracted at baseline. 12 weeks following antihelminthic treatment with praziqunatel, stool DNA was collected from 62 of the 139 children. The 16S rRNA genes were sequenced from the baseline and post-treatment samples and the sequence data, clustered into operational taxonomic units (OTUs). The OTU data were analysed using multivariate analyses and paired T-test.

Results: Pre-treatment, the most abundant phyla were Bacteroidetes, followed by Firmicutes and Proteobacteria respectively. The relative abundance of taxa among bacterial classes showed limited variation by age group or sex and the bacterial communities had similar overall compositions. Although there were no overall differences in the microbiome structure across the whole age range, the abundance of 21 OTUs varied significantly with age (FDR<0.05). Some OTUs including Veillonella, Streptococcus, Bacteroides and Helicobacter were more abundant in children ≤ 1 year old compared to older children. Furthermore, the gut microbiome differed in schistosome infected vs. uninfected children with 27 OTU occurring in infected but not uninfected children, for 5 of these all Prevotella, the difference was statistically significant (p <0.05) with FDR <0.05. PZQ treatment did not alter the microbiome structure in infected or uninfected children from that observed at baseline.

Conclusions: There are significant differences in the gut microbiome structure of infected vs. uninfected children and the differences were refractory to PZQ treatment.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus