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MamA as a Model Protein for Structure-Based Insight into the Evolutionary Origins of Magnetotactic Bacteria.

Zeytuni N, Cronin S, Lefèvre CT, Arnoux P, Baran D, Shtein Z, Davidov G, Zarivach R - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: As such, this allows us to perform structural- and phylogenetic-based analyses using a variety of previously determined MamA from a diverse range of MTB species across various phylogenetic groups.We found that MamA has remained remarkably constant throughout evolution with minimal change between different taxa despite sequence variations.These findings, coupled with the generation of phylogenetic trees using both amino acid sequences and 16S rRNA, indicate that magnetotaxis likely did not spread via horizontal gene transfer and instead has a significantly earlier, primordial origin.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Life Sciences and The National Institute for Biotechnology in the Negev, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer Sheva, Israel.

ABSTRACT
MamA is a highly conserved protein found in magnetotactic bacteria (MTB), a diverse group of prokaryotes capable of navigating according to magnetic fields - an ability known as magnetotaxis. Questions surround the acquisition of this magnetic navigation ability; namely, whether it arose through horizontal or vertical gene transfer. Though its exact function is unknown, MamA surrounds the magnetosome, the magnetic organelle embedding a biomineralised nanoparticle and responsible for magnetotaxis. Several structures for MamA from a variety of species have been determined and show a high degree of structural similarity. By determining the structure of MamA from Desulfovibrio magneticus RS-1 using X-ray crystallography, we have opened up the structure-sequence landscape. As such, this allows us to perform structural- and phylogenetic-based analyses using a variety of previously determined MamA from a diverse range of MTB species across various phylogenetic groups. We found that MamA has remained remarkably constant throughout evolution with minimal change between different taxa despite sequence variations. These findings, coupled with the generation of phylogenetic trees using both amino acid sequences and 16S rRNA, indicate that magnetotaxis likely did not spread via horizontal gene transfer and instead has a significantly earlier, primordial origin.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Congruency of the phylogenetic trees based on (A) MamA protein sequences and on (B) 16S rRNA gene sequences that reflect the evolution of MTB.Scale bars represent the percentage sequence divergence. Bootstrap values at nodes are percentages of 100 replicates. The MTB from Alphaproteobacteria class used in the analyses are: Magnetospirillum magnetotacticum (strain MS-1), Ms. magneticum (AMB-1), Ms. gryphiswaldense (MSR-1), strain SO-1, strain LM-1, Magnetovibrio blakemorei (MV-1), Magnetospira sp. QH-2, strain MO-1, Magnetofaba australis (IT-1) and Magnetococcus marinus (MC-1). Strain SS-5 from the Gammaproteobacteria class is also used. From the Deltaproteobacteria class MTB used include the magnetotactic multicellular prokaryotes Ca. Magnetoglobus multicellularis (MMP) and strain HK-1, Ca. Desulfamplus magnetomortis (BW-1), Desulfovibrio magneticus (RS-1 and FH-1), and strain ML-1. Ca. Magnetobacterium bavaricum (Mbav) and strain MYR-1 of the Nitrospirae phylum was also used. Accession numbers are shown in parenthesis.
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pone.0130394.g001: Congruency of the phylogenetic trees based on (A) MamA protein sequences and on (B) 16S rRNA gene sequences that reflect the evolution of MTB.Scale bars represent the percentage sequence divergence. Bootstrap values at nodes are percentages of 100 replicates. The MTB from Alphaproteobacteria class used in the analyses are: Magnetospirillum magnetotacticum (strain MS-1), Ms. magneticum (AMB-1), Ms. gryphiswaldense (MSR-1), strain SO-1, strain LM-1, Magnetovibrio blakemorei (MV-1), Magnetospira sp. QH-2, strain MO-1, Magnetofaba australis (IT-1) and Magnetococcus marinus (MC-1). Strain SS-5 from the Gammaproteobacteria class is also used. From the Deltaproteobacteria class MTB used include the magnetotactic multicellular prokaryotes Ca. Magnetoglobus multicellularis (MMP) and strain HK-1, Ca. Desulfamplus magnetomortis (BW-1), Desulfovibrio magneticus (RS-1 and FH-1), and strain ML-1. Ca. Magnetobacterium bavaricum (Mbav) and strain MYR-1 of the Nitrospirae phylum was also used. Accession numbers are shown in parenthesis.

Mentions: We aligned the MamA amino acid sequences from the 21 complete MamA proteins (S2 Fig). Phylogenetic trees based on MamA amino acid sequences and 16S rRNA gene sequences show a congruency and a conservation of the different groups that contain MTB (Fig 1). This indicates that mamA evolved monophyletically, like the others magnetosome genes, from a common ancestor of all MTB.


MamA as a Model Protein for Structure-Based Insight into the Evolutionary Origins of Magnetotactic Bacteria.

Zeytuni N, Cronin S, Lefèvre CT, Arnoux P, Baran D, Shtein Z, Davidov G, Zarivach R - PLoS ONE (2015)

Congruency of the phylogenetic trees based on (A) MamA protein sequences and on (B) 16S rRNA gene sequences that reflect the evolution of MTB.Scale bars represent the percentage sequence divergence. Bootstrap values at nodes are percentages of 100 replicates. The MTB from Alphaproteobacteria class used in the analyses are: Magnetospirillum magnetotacticum (strain MS-1), Ms. magneticum (AMB-1), Ms. gryphiswaldense (MSR-1), strain SO-1, strain LM-1, Magnetovibrio blakemorei (MV-1), Magnetospira sp. QH-2, strain MO-1, Magnetofaba australis (IT-1) and Magnetococcus marinus (MC-1). Strain SS-5 from the Gammaproteobacteria class is also used. From the Deltaproteobacteria class MTB used include the magnetotactic multicellular prokaryotes Ca. Magnetoglobus multicellularis (MMP) and strain HK-1, Ca. Desulfamplus magnetomortis (BW-1), Desulfovibrio magneticus (RS-1 and FH-1), and strain ML-1. Ca. Magnetobacterium bavaricum (Mbav) and strain MYR-1 of the Nitrospirae phylum was also used. Accession numbers are shown in parenthesis.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4482739&req=5

pone.0130394.g001: Congruency of the phylogenetic trees based on (A) MamA protein sequences and on (B) 16S rRNA gene sequences that reflect the evolution of MTB.Scale bars represent the percentage sequence divergence. Bootstrap values at nodes are percentages of 100 replicates. The MTB from Alphaproteobacteria class used in the analyses are: Magnetospirillum magnetotacticum (strain MS-1), Ms. magneticum (AMB-1), Ms. gryphiswaldense (MSR-1), strain SO-1, strain LM-1, Magnetovibrio blakemorei (MV-1), Magnetospira sp. QH-2, strain MO-1, Magnetofaba australis (IT-1) and Magnetococcus marinus (MC-1). Strain SS-5 from the Gammaproteobacteria class is also used. From the Deltaproteobacteria class MTB used include the magnetotactic multicellular prokaryotes Ca. Magnetoglobus multicellularis (MMP) and strain HK-1, Ca. Desulfamplus magnetomortis (BW-1), Desulfovibrio magneticus (RS-1 and FH-1), and strain ML-1. Ca. Magnetobacterium bavaricum (Mbav) and strain MYR-1 of the Nitrospirae phylum was also used. Accession numbers are shown in parenthesis.
Mentions: We aligned the MamA amino acid sequences from the 21 complete MamA proteins (S2 Fig). Phylogenetic trees based on MamA amino acid sequences and 16S rRNA gene sequences show a congruency and a conservation of the different groups that contain MTB (Fig 1). This indicates that mamA evolved monophyletically, like the others magnetosome genes, from a common ancestor of all MTB.

Bottom Line: As such, this allows us to perform structural- and phylogenetic-based analyses using a variety of previously determined MamA from a diverse range of MTB species across various phylogenetic groups.We found that MamA has remained remarkably constant throughout evolution with minimal change between different taxa despite sequence variations.These findings, coupled with the generation of phylogenetic trees using both amino acid sequences and 16S rRNA, indicate that magnetotaxis likely did not spread via horizontal gene transfer and instead has a significantly earlier, primordial origin.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Life Sciences and The National Institute for Biotechnology in the Negev, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer Sheva, Israel.

ABSTRACT
MamA is a highly conserved protein found in magnetotactic bacteria (MTB), a diverse group of prokaryotes capable of navigating according to magnetic fields - an ability known as magnetotaxis. Questions surround the acquisition of this magnetic navigation ability; namely, whether it arose through horizontal or vertical gene transfer. Though its exact function is unknown, MamA surrounds the magnetosome, the magnetic organelle embedding a biomineralised nanoparticle and responsible for magnetotaxis. Several structures for MamA from a variety of species have been determined and show a high degree of structural similarity. By determining the structure of MamA from Desulfovibrio magneticus RS-1 using X-ray crystallography, we have opened up the structure-sequence landscape. As such, this allows us to perform structural- and phylogenetic-based analyses using a variety of previously determined MamA from a diverse range of MTB species across various phylogenetic groups. We found that MamA has remained remarkably constant throughout evolution with minimal change between different taxa despite sequence variations. These findings, coupled with the generation of phylogenetic trees using both amino acid sequences and 16S rRNA, indicate that magnetotaxis likely did not spread via horizontal gene transfer and instead has a significantly earlier, primordial origin.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus