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Association of Gestational Age at Birth with Reasons for Subsequent Hospitalisation: 18 Years of Follow-Up in a Western Australian Population Study.

Srinivasjois R, Slimings C, Einarsdóttir K, Burgner D, Leonard H - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: Risks of rehospitalisation following birth discharge by principal diagnoses were compared for gestational age categories (<32, 32-33, 34-36, 37-38 weeks) and term births (39-41 weeks).The highest risks of rehospitalisation were for infection related causes for most GA categories.Compared with full term born infants, those born at shorter GA remain vulnerable to subsequent hospitalisation for a variety of causes up until 18 years of age.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Paediatrics, Joondalup Health Campus, The University of Western Australia, Perth, Western Australia, 6027, Australia.

ABSTRACT

Background: Preterm infants are at a higher risk of hospitalisation following discharge from the hospital after birth. The reasons for rehospitalisation and the association with gestational age are not well understood.

Methods: This was a retrospective birth cohort study of all live, singleton infants born in Western Australia between 1st January 1980 and 31st December 2010, followed to 18 years of age. Risks of rehospitalisation following birth discharge by principal diagnoses were compared for gestational age categories (<32, 32-33, 34-36, 37-38 weeks) and term births (39-41 weeks). Causes of hospitalisations at various gestational age categories were identified using ICD-based discharge diagnostic codes.

Results: Risk of rehospitalisation was inversely correlated with gestational age. Growth-related concerns were the main causes for rehospitalisation in the neonatal period (<1 month of age) for all gestational ages. Infection was the most common reason for hospitalisation from 29 days to 1 year of age, and up to 5 years of age. Injury-related hospitalisations increased in prevalence from 5 years to 18 years of age. Risk of rehospitalisation was higher for all preterm infants for most causes.

Conclusions: The highest risks of rehospitalisation were for infection related causes for most GA categories. Compared with full term born infants, those born at shorter GA remain vulnerable to subsequent hospitalisation for a variety of causes up until 18 years of age.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Most common diagnoses associated with perinatal admissions 0–28 days.
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pone.0130535.g002: Most common diagnoses associated with perinatal admissions 0–28 days.

Mentions: Hospitalisation 0–28 days of life: The risk of rehospitalisation in the first 28 days of life was inversely related to gestational age (S2 Table, S2 Appendix). The risk was highest for infants born at <32 weeks compared with those born at >39 weeks. The predominant reason for rehospitalisation during the first 28 days was for conditions arising in the perinatal period, for which 11% of infants were hospitalised. For perinatal conditions a graded relationship between shorter gestational age and increased risk of hospital admission was observed (S2 Table). The most common perinatal condition was growth related (Fig 1) across all the GA categories with > 90% of infants born at less than 32 weeks of gestation requiring rehospitalisation on this account (Figs 2 and 3). In contrast to the pattern for perinatal conditions, the increased risk of rehospitalisation for infection, gastrointestinal and respiratory problems was seen for the early term and late preterm gestational ages (S2 Table, Figs 2 and 3).


Association of Gestational Age at Birth with Reasons for Subsequent Hospitalisation: 18 Years of Follow-Up in a Western Australian Population Study.

Srinivasjois R, Slimings C, Einarsdóttir K, Burgner D, Leonard H - PLoS ONE (2015)

Most common diagnoses associated with perinatal admissions 0–28 days.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4482718&req=5

pone.0130535.g002: Most common diagnoses associated with perinatal admissions 0–28 days.
Mentions: Hospitalisation 0–28 days of life: The risk of rehospitalisation in the first 28 days of life was inversely related to gestational age (S2 Table, S2 Appendix). The risk was highest for infants born at <32 weeks compared with those born at >39 weeks. The predominant reason for rehospitalisation during the first 28 days was for conditions arising in the perinatal period, for which 11% of infants were hospitalised. For perinatal conditions a graded relationship between shorter gestational age and increased risk of hospital admission was observed (S2 Table). The most common perinatal condition was growth related (Fig 1) across all the GA categories with > 90% of infants born at less than 32 weeks of gestation requiring rehospitalisation on this account (Figs 2 and 3). In contrast to the pattern for perinatal conditions, the increased risk of rehospitalisation for infection, gastrointestinal and respiratory problems was seen for the early term and late preterm gestational ages (S2 Table, Figs 2 and 3).

Bottom Line: Risks of rehospitalisation following birth discharge by principal diagnoses were compared for gestational age categories (<32, 32-33, 34-36, 37-38 weeks) and term births (39-41 weeks).The highest risks of rehospitalisation were for infection related causes for most GA categories.Compared with full term born infants, those born at shorter GA remain vulnerable to subsequent hospitalisation for a variety of causes up until 18 years of age.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Paediatrics, Joondalup Health Campus, The University of Western Australia, Perth, Western Australia, 6027, Australia.

ABSTRACT

Background: Preterm infants are at a higher risk of hospitalisation following discharge from the hospital after birth. The reasons for rehospitalisation and the association with gestational age are not well understood.

Methods: This was a retrospective birth cohort study of all live, singleton infants born in Western Australia between 1st January 1980 and 31st December 2010, followed to 18 years of age. Risks of rehospitalisation following birth discharge by principal diagnoses were compared for gestational age categories (<32, 32-33, 34-36, 37-38 weeks) and term births (39-41 weeks). Causes of hospitalisations at various gestational age categories were identified using ICD-based discharge diagnostic codes.

Results: Risk of rehospitalisation was inversely correlated with gestational age. Growth-related concerns were the main causes for rehospitalisation in the neonatal period (<1 month of age) for all gestational ages. Infection was the most common reason for hospitalisation from 29 days to 1 year of age, and up to 5 years of age. Injury-related hospitalisations increased in prevalence from 5 years to 18 years of age. Risk of rehospitalisation was higher for all preterm infants for most causes.

Conclusions: The highest risks of rehospitalisation were for infection related causes for most GA categories. Compared with full term born infants, those born at shorter GA remain vulnerable to subsequent hospitalisation for a variety of causes up until 18 years of age.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus