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Economic Assessment of FMDv Releases from the National Bio and Agro Defense Facility.

Pendell DL, Marsh TL, Coble KH, Lusk JL, Szmania SC - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: This study evaluates the economic consequences of hypothetical foot-and-mouth disease releases from the future National Bio and Agro Defense Facility in Manhattan, Kansas.Using an economic framework that estimates the impacts to agricultural firms and consumers, quantifies costs to non-agricultural activities in the epidemiologically impacted region, and assesses costs of response to the government, we find the distribution of economic impacts to be very significant.Furthermore, agricultural firms and consumers bear most of the impacts followed by the government and the regional non-agricultural firms.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Agricultural Economics, Kansas State University, Manhattan, Kansas, United States of America.

ABSTRACT
This study evaluates the economic consequences of hypothetical foot-and-mouth disease releases from the future National Bio and Agro Defense Facility in Manhattan, Kansas. Using an economic framework that estimates the impacts to agricultural firms and consumers, quantifies costs to non-agricultural activities in the epidemiologically impacted region, and assesses costs of response to the government, we find the distribution of economic impacts to be very significant. Furthermore, agricultural firms and consumers bear most of the impacts followed by the government and the regional non-agricultural firms.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Changes in Producers Returns to Capital and Management for Liquid Waste Event, P50/P50 Scenario.
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pone.0129134.g001: Changes in Producers Returns to Capital and Management for Liquid Waste Event, P50/P50 Scenario.

Mentions: Table 6 summarizes the distributional cumulative economic impact across the entire study period for the liquid waste release (beginning in 2009 and ending in 2018). However, consequences of disease outbreaks are inherently dynamic in nature with benefits and costs accruing differently to producers and consumers across time, and this interplay has important policy implications [5]. Fig 1 illustrates the changes in producer returns to capital and management by agricultural sector across time for the P50/P50 Liquid Waste scenario. After an outbreak is announced there is an immediate negative effect on the swine and beef cattle sectors of about $2,400 million. This is due to the loss of livestock, meat, and dairy export markets, reduced demand for red meat and dairy products by domestic consumers, and culled animals. When the outbreak is officially declared over (the 5th quarter), the beef cattle sector’s producers returns to capital and management has rebounded to the pre-outbreak levels while the swine sector’s recovery to pre-disease outbreak levels occurs approximately four quarters later (the 9th quarter). This result is mostly due to the amount of exports lost by both sectors; approximately 7% and 17% of U.S. beef and swine production in 2009 was exported, respectively. After the 5th quarter, beef producers experience positive returns, and do so for the next 17 quarters, primarily a result of lower grain and forage prices, consumer demand fully recovering, and the gradual recovery of export markets. Swine producers also have positive gains, but not as large of gains as the beef cattle producers.


Economic Assessment of FMDv Releases from the National Bio and Agro Defense Facility.

Pendell DL, Marsh TL, Coble KH, Lusk JL, Szmania SC - PLoS ONE (2015)

Changes in Producers Returns to Capital and Management for Liquid Waste Event, P50/P50 Scenario.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4482686&req=5

pone.0129134.g001: Changes in Producers Returns to Capital and Management for Liquid Waste Event, P50/P50 Scenario.
Mentions: Table 6 summarizes the distributional cumulative economic impact across the entire study period for the liquid waste release (beginning in 2009 and ending in 2018). However, consequences of disease outbreaks are inherently dynamic in nature with benefits and costs accruing differently to producers and consumers across time, and this interplay has important policy implications [5]. Fig 1 illustrates the changes in producer returns to capital and management by agricultural sector across time for the P50/P50 Liquid Waste scenario. After an outbreak is announced there is an immediate negative effect on the swine and beef cattle sectors of about $2,400 million. This is due to the loss of livestock, meat, and dairy export markets, reduced demand for red meat and dairy products by domestic consumers, and culled animals. When the outbreak is officially declared over (the 5th quarter), the beef cattle sector’s producers returns to capital and management has rebounded to the pre-outbreak levels while the swine sector’s recovery to pre-disease outbreak levels occurs approximately four quarters later (the 9th quarter). This result is mostly due to the amount of exports lost by both sectors; approximately 7% and 17% of U.S. beef and swine production in 2009 was exported, respectively. After the 5th quarter, beef producers experience positive returns, and do so for the next 17 quarters, primarily a result of lower grain and forage prices, consumer demand fully recovering, and the gradual recovery of export markets. Swine producers also have positive gains, but not as large of gains as the beef cattle producers.

Bottom Line: This study evaluates the economic consequences of hypothetical foot-and-mouth disease releases from the future National Bio and Agro Defense Facility in Manhattan, Kansas.Using an economic framework that estimates the impacts to agricultural firms and consumers, quantifies costs to non-agricultural activities in the epidemiologically impacted region, and assesses costs of response to the government, we find the distribution of economic impacts to be very significant.Furthermore, agricultural firms and consumers bear most of the impacts followed by the government and the regional non-agricultural firms.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Agricultural Economics, Kansas State University, Manhattan, Kansas, United States of America.

ABSTRACT
This study evaluates the economic consequences of hypothetical foot-and-mouth disease releases from the future National Bio and Agro Defense Facility in Manhattan, Kansas. Using an economic framework that estimates the impacts to agricultural firms and consumers, quantifies costs to non-agricultural activities in the epidemiologically impacted region, and assesses costs of response to the government, we find the distribution of economic impacts to be very significant. Furthermore, agricultural firms and consumers bear most of the impacts followed by the government and the regional non-agricultural firms.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus