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"Attacks" or "Whistling": Impact of Questionnaire Wording on Wheeze Prevalence Estimates.

Pescatore AM, Spycher BD, Beardsmore CS, Kuehni CE - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: Prevalence of other respiratory symptoms did not differ between groups.The strength of association with risk factors was comparable in the two groups.Question wording is a potential source of between-study-heterogeneity in meta-analyses.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Social and Preventive Medicine, University Bern, Bern, Switzerland.

ABSTRACT

Background: Estimates of prevalence of wheeze depend on questionnaires. However, wording of questions may vary between studies. We investigated effects of alternative wording on estimates of prevalence and severity of wheeze, and associations with risk factors.

Methods: White and South Asian children from a population-based cohort (UK) were randomly assigned to two groups and followed up at one, four and six years (1998, 2001, 2003). Parents were asked either if their child ever had "attacks of wheeze" (attack group, N=535), or "wheezing or whistling in the chest" (whistling group, N=2859). All other study aspects were identical, including questions about other respiratory symptoms.

Results: Prevalence of wheeze ever was lower in the attack group than in the whistling group for all surveys (32 vs. 40% in white children aged one year, p<0.001). Prevalence of other respiratory symptoms did not differ between groups. Wheeze tended to be more severe in the attack group. The strength of association with risk factors was comparable in the two groups.

Conclusions: The wording of questions on wheeze can affect estimates of prevalence, but has less impact on measured associations with risk factors. Question wording is a potential source of between-study-heterogeneity in meta-analyses.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Crude and adjusted odds ratios for respiratory symptoms in white children.The odds ratios compare the whistling group to the attack group (adjusted for sex, exact age, breast feeding, nursery care, number of siblings, pre- and postnatal exposure to environmental tobacco smoke (ETS), parental asthma and parental hay fever, Townsend score (an area-based deprivation measure) and parental education). The error bars denote 95% confidence intervals.
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pone.0131618.g001: Crude and adjusted odds ratios for respiratory symptoms in white children.The odds ratios compare the whistling group to the attack group (adjusted for sex, exact age, breast feeding, nursery care, number of siblings, pre- and postnatal exposure to environmental tobacco smoke (ETS), parental asthma and parental hay fever, Townsend score (an area-based deprivation measure) and parental education). The error bars denote 95% confidence intervals.

Mentions: Adjusting for risk factors for wheeze did not affect our findings at any age (Fig 1). At the age of one year, when we compared white children in the whistling group and the attack group, unadjusted OR for wheeze ever was 1.41 (95% CI 1.16, 1.72) and adjusted OR was 1.42 (1.12, 1.78). For current wheeze, unadjusted OR was 1.18 (0.97, 1.43) and adjusted OR was 1.22 (0.97, 1.54). Other respiratory questions were also similar between groups, with adjusted OR of 1.07 (0.82, 1.38) for night cough, 1.02 (0.81, 1.29) for chronic rhinitis, and 0.98 (0.79, 1.22) for any ear infection.


"Attacks" or "Whistling": Impact of Questionnaire Wording on Wheeze Prevalence Estimates.

Pescatore AM, Spycher BD, Beardsmore CS, Kuehni CE - PLoS ONE (2015)

Crude and adjusted odds ratios for respiratory symptoms in white children.The odds ratios compare the whistling group to the attack group (adjusted for sex, exact age, breast feeding, nursery care, number of siblings, pre- and postnatal exposure to environmental tobacco smoke (ETS), parental asthma and parental hay fever, Townsend score (an area-based deprivation measure) and parental education). The error bars denote 95% confidence intervals.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4482591&req=5

pone.0131618.g001: Crude and adjusted odds ratios for respiratory symptoms in white children.The odds ratios compare the whistling group to the attack group (adjusted for sex, exact age, breast feeding, nursery care, number of siblings, pre- and postnatal exposure to environmental tobacco smoke (ETS), parental asthma and parental hay fever, Townsend score (an area-based deprivation measure) and parental education). The error bars denote 95% confidence intervals.
Mentions: Adjusting for risk factors for wheeze did not affect our findings at any age (Fig 1). At the age of one year, when we compared white children in the whistling group and the attack group, unadjusted OR for wheeze ever was 1.41 (95% CI 1.16, 1.72) and adjusted OR was 1.42 (1.12, 1.78). For current wheeze, unadjusted OR was 1.18 (0.97, 1.43) and adjusted OR was 1.22 (0.97, 1.54). Other respiratory questions were also similar between groups, with adjusted OR of 1.07 (0.82, 1.38) for night cough, 1.02 (0.81, 1.29) for chronic rhinitis, and 0.98 (0.79, 1.22) for any ear infection.

Bottom Line: Prevalence of other respiratory symptoms did not differ between groups.The strength of association with risk factors was comparable in the two groups.Question wording is a potential source of between-study-heterogeneity in meta-analyses.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Social and Preventive Medicine, University Bern, Bern, Switzerland.

ABSTRACT

Background: Estimates of prevalence of wheeze depend on questionnaires. However, wording of questions may vary between studies. We investigated effects of alternative wording on estimates of prevalence and severity of wheeze, and associations with risk factors.

Methods: White and South Asian children from a population-based cohort (UK) were randomly assigned to two groups and followed up at one, four and six years (1998, 2001, 2003). Parents were asked either if their child ever had "attacks of wheeze" (attack group, N=535), or "wheezing or whistling in the chest" (whistling group, N=2859). All other study aspects were identical, including questions about other respiratory symptoms.

Results: Prevalence of wheeze ever was lower in the attack group than in the whistling group for all surveys (32 vs. 40% in white children aged one year, p<0.001). Prevalence of other respiratory symptoms did not differ between groups. Wheeze tended to be more severe in the attack group. The strength of association with risk factors was comparable in the two groups.

Conclusions: The wording of questions on wheeze can affect estimates of prevalence, but has less impact on measured associations with risk factors. Question wording is a potential source of between-study-heterogeneity in meta-analyses.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus