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A Land-Use Perspective for Birdstrike Risk Assessment: The Attraction Risk Index.

Coccon F, Zucchetta M, Bossi G, Borrotti M, Torricelli P, Franzoi P - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: Collisions between aircraft and birds, birdstrikes, pose a serious threat to aviation safety.These GLMs predictions were combined to the flight altitude of birds within the 13-km buffer, the airport traffic pattern and the severity indices associated with impacts.Information on the contribution of habitats in attracting birds, depending on season, can be used by airport managers and local authorities to plan specific interventions in the study area in order to lower the risk.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Environmental Sciences, Informatics and Statistics, University Ca' Foscari of Venice, Venice, Italy.

ABSTRACT
Collisions between aircraft and birds, birdstrikes, pose a serious threat to aviation safety. The occurrence of these events is influenced by land-uses in the surroundings of airports. Airports located in the same region might have different trends for birdstrike risk, due to differences in the surrounding habitats. Here we developed a quantitative tool that assesses the risk of birdstrike based on the habitats within a 13-km buffer from the airport. For this purpose, we developed Generalized Linear Models (GLMs) with binomial distribution to estimate the contribution of habitats to wildlife use of the study area, depending on season. These GLMs predictions were combined to the flight altitude of birds within the 13-km buffer, the airport traffic pattern and the severity indices associated with impacts. Our approach was developed at Venice Marco Polo International airport (VCE), located in northeast Italy and then tested at Treviso Antonio Canova International airport (TSF), which is 20 km inland. Results from the two airports revealed that both the surrounding habitats and the season had a significant influence to the pattern of risk. With regard to VCE, agricultural fields, wetlands and urban areas contributed most to the presence of birds in the study area. Furthermore, the key role of distance of land-uses from the airport on the probability of presence of birds was highlighted. The reliability of developed risk index was demonstrated since at VCE it was significantly correlated with bird strike rate. This study emphasizes the importance of the territory near airports and the wildlife use of its habitats, as factors in need of consideration for birdstrike risk assessment procedures. Information on the contribution of habitats in attracting birds, depending on season, can be used by airport managers and local authorities to plan specific interventions in the study area in order to lower the risk.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Area within 13-km buffer from Venice Marco Polo airport (VCE) divided in 1-km2 cells grid and habitat categories present in it.Land uses were identified using CORINE Land Cover, CLC, classification and mapped using a Geographical Information System, GIS.
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pone.0128363.g002: Area within 13-km buffer from Venice Marco Polo airport (VCE) divided in 1-km2 cells grid and habitat categories present in it.Land uses were identified using CORINE Land Cover, CLC, classification and mapped using a Geographical Information System, GIS.

Mentions: Blackwell et al. (2009) [9] encouraged the inclusion of land-use data around airports, as well as wildlife use in these habitats, into wildlife strike risk assessment. In this perspective, we used avian survey data reported in the ornithological atlas of Venice municipality [32], that presents results of bird censuses conducted in the municipality of Venice in the period 2006–2011. For bird atlas data collection, the study area was divided in a regular grid of 1-km cells and, in order to georeference them, entries were assigned to the code of detection unit in which these were recorded. To simplify data management, we classified the recorded bird species according to the group composition proposed by Soldatini et al.(2011) [27]. Furthermore, based on date of surveys, we divided data into four periods, approximately corresponding to the four phases of birds’ biological cycle: wintering (from November to January), spring migration (from February to April), breeding (from May to July) and fall migration (from August to October), to take into account the seasonal variations associated with the ecological needs of birds. For this study, we assumed atlas data as reflective of current conditions in the airport surroundings. Finally, data reorganized as explained above, were analysed in relation to the proportional coverage of the six habitat categories and to distance of cells from the runway (Fig 2 and S1 Dataset). This to estimate the probability of presence per 1-km cell, by groups of species and period of the year, in function of habitat types and position of cell relative to airport. The percentage of habitat categories and distance from the runway were calculated for each cell of the reference grid falling within a 13-km buffer from the airport, using a Geographical Information System, GIS.


A Land-Use Perspective for Birdstrike Risk Assessment: The Attraction Risk Index.

Coccon F, Zucchetta M, Bossi G, Borrotti M, Torricelli P, Franzoi P - PLoS ONE (2015)

Area within 13-km buffer from Venice Marco Polo airport (VCE) divided in 1-km2 cells grid and habitat categories present in it.Land uses were identified using CORINE Land Cover, CLC, classification and mapped using a Geographical Information System, GIS.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4482575&req=5

pone.0128363.g002: Area within 13-km buffer from Venice Marco Polo airport (VCE) divided in 1-km2 cells grid and habitat categories present in it.Land uses were identified using CORINE Land Cover, CLC, classification and mapped using a Geographical Information System, GIS.
Mentions: Blackwell et al. (2009) [9] encouraged the inclusion of land-use data around airports, as well as wildlife use in these habitats, into wildlife strike risk assessment. In this perspective, we used avian survey data reported in the ornithological atlas of Venice municipality [32], that presents results of bird censuses conducted in the municipality of Venice in the period 2006–2011. For bird atlas data collection, the study area was divided in a regular grid of 1-km cells and, in order to georeference them, entries were assigned to the code of detection unit in which these were recorded. To simplify data management, we classified the recorded bird species according to the group composition proposed by Soldatini et al.(2011) [27]. Furthermore, based on date of surveys, we divided data into four periods, approximately corresponding to the four phases of birds’ biological cycle: wintering (from November to January), spring migration (from February to April), breeding (from May to July) and fall migration (from August to October), to take into account the seasonal variations associated with the ecological needs of birds. For this study, we assumed atlas data as reflective of current conditions in the airport surroundings. Finally, data reorganized as explained above, were analysed in relation to the proportional coverage of the six habitat categories and to distance of cells from the runway (Fig 2 and S1 Dataset). This to estimate the probability of presence per 1-km cell, by groups of species and period of the year, in function of habitat types and position of cell relative to airport. The percentage of habitat categories and distance from the runway were calculated for each cell of the reference grid falling within a 13-km buffer from the airport, using a Geographical Information System, GIS.

Bottom Line: Collisions between aircraft and birds, birdstrikes, pose a serious threat to aviation safety.These GLMs predictions were combined to the flight altitude of birds within the 13-km buffer, the airport traffic pattern and the severity indices associated with impacts.Information on the contribution of habitats in attracting birds, depending on season, can be used by airport managers and local authorities to plan specific interventions in the study area in order to lower the risk.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Environmental Sciences, Informatics and Statistics, University Ca' Foscari of Venice, Venice, Italy.

ABSTRACT
Collisions between aircraft and birds, birdstrikes, pose a serious threat to aviation safety. The occurrence of these events is influenced by land-uses in the surroundings of airports. Airports located in the same region might have different trends for birdstrike risk, due to differences in the surrounding habitats. Here we developed a quantitative tool that assesses the risk of birdstrike based on the habitats within a 13-km buffer from the airport. For this purpose, we developed Generalized Linear Models (GLMs) with binomial distribution to estimate the contribution of habitats to wildlife use of the study area, depending on season. These GLMs predictions were combined to the flight altitude of birds within the 13-km buffer, the airport traffic pattern and the severity indices associated with impacts. Our approach was developed at Venice Marco Polo International airport (VCE), located in northeast Italy and then tested at Treviso Antonio Canova International airport (TSF), which is 20 km inland. Results from the two airports revealed that both the surrounding habitats and the season had a significant influence to the pattern of risk. With regard to VCE, agricultural fields, wetlands and urban areas contributed most to the presence of birds in the study area. Furthermore, the key role of distance of land-uses from the airport on the probability of presence of birds was highlighted. The reliability of developed risk index was demonstrated since at VCE it was significantly correlated with bird strike rate. This study emphasizes the importance of the territory near airports and the wildlife use of its habitats, as factors in need of consideration for birdstrike risk assessment procedures. Information on the contribution of habitats in attracting birds, depending on season, can be used by airport managers and local authorities to plan specific interventions in the study area in order to lower the risk.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus