Limits...
Degradation of Bunker C Fuel Oil by White-Rot Fungi in Sawdust Cultures Suggests Potential Applications in Bioremediation.

Young D, Rice J, Martin R, Lindquist E, Lipzen A, Grigoriev I, Hibbett D - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: Six genes were significantly upregulated in media containing oil; these genes included three enzymes with potential roles in xenobiotic biotransformation.Carbohydrate metabolism genes showing differential expression significantly accumulated transcripts on aspen vs. pine substrates, perhaps reflecting white-rot adaptations to growth on hardwood substrates.The mechanisms by which P. strigosozonata may degrade complex oil compounds remain obscure, but degradation results of the 180-day cultures suggest that diverse white-rot fungi have promise for bioremediation of petroleum fuels.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Biology Department, Clark University, Worcester, MA, United States of America.

ABSTRACT
Fungal lignocellulolytic enzymes are promising agents for oxidizing pollutants. This study investigated degradation of Number 6 "Bunker C" fuel oil compounds by the white-rot fungi Irpex lacteus, Trichaptum biforme, Phlebia radiata, Trametes versicolor, and Pleurotus ostreatus (Basidiomycota, Agaricomycetes). Averaging across all studied species, 98.1%, 48.6%, and 76.4% of the initial Bunker C C10 alkane, C14 alkane, and phenanthrene, respectively were degraded after 180 days of fungal growth on pine media. This study also investigated whether Bunker C oil induces changes in gene expression in the white-rot fungus Punctularia strigosozonata, for which a complete reference genome is available. After 20 days of growth, a monokaryon P. strigosozonata strain degraded 99% of the initial C10 alkane in both pine and aspen media but did not affect the amounts of the C14 alkane or phenanthrene. Differential gene expression analysis identified 119 genes with ≥ log2(2-fold) greater expression in one or more treatment comparisons. Six genes were significantly upregulated in media containing oil; these genes included three enzymes with potential roles in xenobiotic biotransformation. Carbohydrate metabolism genes showing differential expression significantly accumulated transcripts on aspen vs. pine substrates, perhaps reflecting white-rot adaptations to growth on hardwood substrates. The mechanisms by which P. strigosozonata may degrade complex oil compounds remain obscure, but degradation results of the 180-day cultures suggest that diverse white-rot fungi have promise for bioremediation of petroleum fuels.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Biplot of principal components (PC) axes PC1 and PC2 derived from a Principal Components Analysis (PCA) of mapped paired-end Illumina RNA-Seq reads from 20 day-old Punctularia strigosozonata cultures in media treatments (aspen, aspen with Bunker C oil, pine, and pine with Bunker C oil).Ordination was completed in the R package DESeq.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4482389&req=5

pone.0130381.g002: Biplot of principal components (PC) axes PC1 and PC2 derived from a Principal Components Analysis (PCA) of mapped paired-end Illumina RNA-Seq reads from 20 day-old Punctularia strigosozonata cultures in media treatments (aspen, aspen with Bunker C oil, pine, and pine with Bunker C oil).Ordination was completed in the R package DESeq.

Mentions: Oil compound degradation was assessed by comparing peak intensities in GC-MS signals between samples and autoclaved oil (example chromatograms of T. versicolor sample A and Bunker C oil in Figs 1A and 2B). Hopane (retention time = 38.3 m) and a C10 alkane (retention time = 10 m) in Bunker C oil were not present in noteworthy amounts in spawn controls (S1 and S3 Figs). The phenanthrene (retention time = 19.9 m) and C14 alkane (retention time = 20.2 min) peaks in the oil were detected in small amounts in uninoculated media controls (S2 and S3 Figs). The phenanthrene/hopane, C14 alkane/hopane, and C10 alkane/hopane compound peak area ratios in the autoclaved Bunker C oil were used to normalize the compound/hopane ratios in the experimental cultures so that the percentages of compound degradation could be compared among samples (Eq 1; Table 1).


Degradation of Bunker C Fuel Oil by White-Rot Fungi in Sawdust Cultures Suggests Potential Applications in Bioremediation.

Young D, Rice J, Martin R, Lindquist E, Lipzen A, Grigoriev I, Hibbett D - PLoS ONE (2015)

Biplot of principal components (PC) axes PC1 and PC2 derived from a Principal Components Analysis (PCA) of mapped paired-end Illumina RNA-Seq reads from 20 day-old Punctularia strigosozonata cultures in media treatments (aspen, aspen with Bunker C oil, pine, and pine with Bunker C oil).Ordination was completed in the R package DESeq.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4482389&req=5

pone.0130381.g002: Biplot of principal components (PC) axes PC1 and PC2 derived from a Principal Components Analysis (PCA) of mapped paired-end Illumina RNA-Seq reads from 20 day-old Punctularia strigosozonata cultures in media treatments (aspen, aspen with Bunker C oil, pine, and pine with Bunker C oil).Ordination was completed in the R package DESeq.
Mentions: Oil compound degradation was assessed by comparing peak intensities in GC-MS signals between samples and autoclaved oil (example chromatograms of T. versicolor sample A and Bunker C oil in Figs 1A and 2B). Hopane (retention time = 38.3 m) and a C10 alkane (retention time = 10 m) in Bunker C oil were not present in noteworthy amounts in spawn controls (S1 and S3 Figs). The phenanthrene (retention time = 19.9 m) and C14 alkane (retention time = 20.2 min) peaks in the oil were detected in small amounts in uninoculated media controls (S2 and S3 Figs). The phenanthrene/hopane, C14 alkane/hopane, and C10 alkane/hopane compound peak area ratios in the autoclaved Bunker C oil were used to normalize the compound/hopane ratios in the experimental cultures so that the percentages of compound degradation could be compared among samples (Eq 1; Table 1).

Bottom Line: Six genes were significantly upregulated in media containing oil; these genes included three enzymes with potential roles in xenobiotic biotransformation.Carbohydrate metabolism genes showing differential expression significantly accumulated transcripts on aspen vs. pine substrates, perhaps reflecting white-rot adaptations to growth on hardwood substrates.The mechanisms by which P. strigosozonata may degrade complex oil compounds remain obscure, but degradation results of the 180-day cultures suggest that diverse white-rot fungi have promise for bioremediation of petroleum fuels.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Biology Department, Clark University, Worcester, MA, United States of America.

ABSTRACT
Fungal lignocellulolytic enzymes are promising agents for oxidizing pollutants. This study investigated degradation of Number 6 "Bunker C" fuel oil compounds by the white-rot fungi Irpex lacteus, Trichaptum biforme, Phlebia radiata, Trametes versicolor, and Pleurotus ostreatus (Basidiomycota, Agaricomycetes). Averaging across all studied species, 98.1%, 48.6%, and 76.4% of the initial Bunker C C10 alkane, C14 alkane, and phenanthrene, respectively were degraded after 180 days of fungal growth on pine media. This study also investigated whether Bunker C oil induces changes in gene expression in the white-rot fungus Punctularia strigosozonata, for which a complete reference genome is available. After 20 days of growth, a monokaryon P. strigosozonata strain degraded 99% of the initial C10 alkane in both pine and aspen media but did not affect the amounts of the C14 alkane or phenanthrene. Differential gene expression analysis identified 119 genes with ≥ log2(2-fold) greater expression in one or more treatment comparisons. Six genes were significantly upregulated in media containing oil; these genes included three enzymes with potential roles in xenobiotic biotransformation. Carbohydrate metabolism genes showing differential expression significantly accumulated transcripts on aspen vs. pine substrates, perhaps reflecting white-rot adaptations to growth on hardwood substrates. The mechanisms by which P. strigosozonata may degrade complex oil compounds remain obscure, but degradation results of the 180-day cultures suggest that diverse white-rot fungi have promise for bioremediation of petroleum fuels.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus