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Reward-Induced Phasic Dopamine Release in the Monkey Ventral Striatum and Putamen.

Yoshimi K, Kumada S, Weitemier A, Jo T, Inoue M - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: The response to the liquid reward after conditioned stimuli was enhanced after switching the prediction cue.These characteristics were generally similar between the ventral striatum and the putamen.Overall, the technical application of FSCV recording in multiple locations was successful in behaving primates, and further voltammetric recordings in multiple locations will expand our knowledge of dopamine reward responses.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neurophysiology, Juntendo University School of Medicine, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, Japan.

ABSTRACT
In-vivo voltammetry has successfully been used to detect dopamine release in rodent brains, but its application to monkeys has been limited. We have previously detected dopamine release in the caudate of behaving Japanese monkeys using diamond microelectrodes (Yoshimi 2011); however it is not known whether the release pattern is the same in various areas of the forebrain. Recent studies have suggested variations in the dopaminergic projections to forebrain areas. In the present study, we attempted simultaneous recording at two locations in the striatum, using fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) on carbon fibers, which has been widely used in rodents. Responses to unpredicted food and liquid rewards were detected repeatedly. The response to the liquid reward after conditioned stimuli was enhanced after switching the prediction cue. These characteristics were generally similar between the ventral striatum and the putamen. Overall, the technical application of FSCV recording in multiple locations was successful in behaving primates, and further voltammetric recordings in multiple locations will expand our knowledge of dopamine reward responses.

No MeSH data available.


Examples of handed food reward responses in two monkeys (S and C).Simultaneous recording in ventral striatum (top) and putamen (bottom). The recorded positions are indicated on the MRI images. A small soft biscuit (Tamago-boro) was manually delivered by the examiner. The motion of the examiner turning back and picking up a biscuit from a table and putting it to the mouth of the monkey, occurred within 2 s. The data were aligned to the moment the biscuit touched the mouth. Note there is no physical/ingestional event before time 0, but only social observation. Vertical lines indicate s.e.m. S6 n = 24–25, C4 n = 46
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pone.0130443.g007: Examples of handed food reward responses in two monkeys (S and C).Simultaneous recording in ventral striatum (top) and putamen (bottom). The recorded positions are indicated on the MRI images. A small soft biscuit (Tamago-boro) was manually delivered by the examiner. The motion of the examiner turning back and picking up a biscuit from a table and putting it to the mouth of the monkey, occurred within 2 s. The data were aligned to the moment the biscuit touched the mouth. Note there is no physical/ingestional event before time 0, but only social observation. Vertical lines indicate s.e.m. S6 n = 24–25, C4 n = 46

Mentions: A clear increase in the dopamine-like component was observed just before receiving the biscuit and a sharp drop after the retrievals (Fig 7). This result seems to reflect dopamine release associated with the expectation of food delivery. This reward-prediction response prior to the delivery was significant in 5/11 successful recordings (Table 2). In experiment S7, only a sharp drop after the acquisition of the food was observed (Table 2).


Reward-Induced Phasic Dopamine Release in the Monkey Ventral Striatum and Putamen.

Yoshimi K, Kumada S, Weitemier A, Jo T, Inoue M - PLoS ONE (2015)

Examples of handed food reward responses in two monkeys (S and C).Simultaneous recording in ventral striatum (top) and putamen (bottom). The recorded positions are indicated on the MRI images. A small soft biscuit (Tamago-boro) was manually delivered by the examiner. The motion of the examiner turning back and picking up a biscuit from a table and putting it to the mouth of the monkey, occurred within 2 s. The data were aligned to the moment the biscuit touched the mouth. Note there is no physical/ingestional event before time 0, but only social observation. Vertical lines indicate s.e.m. S6 n = 24–25, C4 n = 46
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

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getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4482386&req=5

pone.0130443.g007: Examples of handed food reward responses in two monkeys (S and C).Simultaneous recording in ventral striatum (top) and putamen (bottom). The recorded positions are indicated on the MRI images. A small soft biscuit (Tamago-boro) was manually delivered by the examiner. The motion of the examiner turning back and picking up a biscuit from a table and putting it to the mouth of the monkey, occurred within 2 s. The data were aligned to the moment the biscuit touched the mouth. Note there is no physical/ingestional event before time 0, but only social observation. Vertical lines indicate s.e.m. S6 n = 24–25, C4 n = 46
Mentions: A clear increase in the dopamine-like component was observed just before receiving the biscuit and a sharp drop after the retrievals (Fig 7). This result seems to reflect dopamine release associated with the expectation of food delivery. This reward-prediction response prior to the delivery was significant in 5/11 successful recordings (Table 2). In experiment S7, only a sharp drop after the acquisition of the food was observed (Table 2).

Bottom Line: The response to the liquid reward after conditioned stimuli was enhanced after switching the prediction cue.These characteristics were generally similar between the ventral striatum and the putamen.Overall, the technical application of FSCV recording in multiple locations was successful in behaving primates, and further voltammetric recordings in multiple locations will expand our knowledge of dopamine reward responses.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neurophysiology, Juntendo University School of Medicine, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, Japan.

ABSTRACT
In-vivo voltammetry has successfully been used to detect dopamine release in rodent brains, but its application to monkeys has been limited. We have previously detected dopamine release in the caudate of behaving Japanese monkeys using diamond microelectrodes (Yoshimi 2011); however it is not known whether the release pattern is the same in various areas of the forebrain. Recent studies have suggested variations in the dopaminergic projections to forebrain areas. In the present study, we attempted simultaneous recording at two locations in the striatum, using fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) on carbon fibers, which has been widely used in rodents. Responses to unpredicted food and liquid rewards were detected repeatedly. The response to the liquid reward after conditioned stimuli was enhanced after switching the prediction cue. These characteristics were generally similar between the ventral striatum and the putamen. Overall, the technical application of FSCV recording in multiple locations was successful in behaving primates, and further voltammetric recordings in multiple locations will expand our knowledge of dopamine reward responses.

No MeSH data available.