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Infant Cancer in Taiwan: Incidence and Trends (1995-2009).

Hung GY, Horng JL, Yen HJ, Lee CY - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: Compared with other countries, the rate of hepatoblastoma in Taiwan was second to that from Beijing (China) and 2 to 5 times greater compared with the US, France, the North of England and Osaka (Japan).The rates of germ cell neoplasms were 2 to 4 times greater in Taiwan.The factors associated with higher rates of hepatoblastoma and germ cell neoplasms warrant further investigation on similar ethnic groups of different areas to elucidate the potential environmental impacts while controlling for race.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Pediatric Hematology and Oncology, Department of Pediatrics, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan; Department of Pediatrics, National Yang-Ming University School of Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan.

ABSTRACT

Background: Current information about cancer incidence patterns among infants in East Asia is rare. The objective of this study was to report the first population-based cancer surveillance of infants in Taiwan.

Methods: Cancer frequencies and incidence rates among subjects aged <1 year for the period 1995-2009 were obtained from the Taiwan Cancer Registry. Types of cancers were grouped according to the International Classification of Childhood Cancer. Rates and trends were analyzed by sex and disease groups and further compared with that of other countries.

Results: A total of 900 infants were diagnosed with cancers, giving an incidence rate of 250.7 per million person-years from 1995 to 2009. The male-to-female incidence rate ratio was 1.22. Overall, leukemias (56.3 per million) were the most common cancer, followed by germ cell neoplasms (43.2) and neuroblastomas (41.8). The incidence increased by 2.5% annually during the 15-year study period and was predominantly contributed by male infants (3.5%). Compared with other countries, the rate of hepatoblastoma in Taiwan was second to that from Beijing (China) and 2 to 5 times greater compared with the US, France, the North of England and Osaka (Japan). The rates of germ cell neoplasms were 2 to 4 times greater in Taiwan.

Conclusions: The current data suggests that cancer incidence rate among male infants was rising in Taiwan. The factors associated with higher rates of hepatoblastoma and germ cell neoplasms warrant further investigation on similar ethnic groups of different areas to elucidate the potential environmental impacts while controlling for race.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Gender-specific cancer incidence rates for children aged 0–14 years by single year of age: Taiwan, 1995–2009.
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pone.0130444.g001: Gender-specific cancer incidence rates for children aged 0–14 years by single year of age: Taiwan, 1995–2009.

Mentions: Table 1 summarizes differences in cancer incidence by sex for all infants for the years 1995 to 2009 in Taiwan. A total of 900 infants were diagnosed with cancers, giving an average of 60 cases annually. The overall incidence rate was 250.71 per million person-years. The infants represented 11% (900/8193) of all childhood cancers (aged 0–14 years) (Fig 1). Overall, leukemias (56.27 per million person-years) were the most common cancer type, followed by germ cell neoplasms (43.18 per million) and neuroblastomas (41.79 per million). The three largest groups accounted for more than half (56%) of all cancers among infants. In terms of data quality indicators defined by IARC, the DCO% for all infant cancers combined fell from 6.8% in 1995 to 0% in 2009. The MV% for all cancers combined during the 15-year study period was 95.7%. In terms of MV% according to cancer type, it varied from 86.8% (retinoblastoma) to 100% (both soft tissue sarcomas and malignant bone tumors) for most of the main groups of ICCC-3, except group XII (other and unspecified neoplasms) with a MV% of only 75% (Table 2).


Infant Cancer in Taiwan: Incidence and Trends (1995-2009).

Hung GY, Horng JL, Yen HJ, Lee CY - PLoS ONE (2015)

Gender-specific cancer incidence rates for children aged 0–14 years by single year of age: Taiwan, 1995–2009.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4482260&req=5

pone.0130444.g001: Gender-specific cancer incidence rates for children aged 0–14 years by single year of age: Taiwan, 1995–2009.
Mentions: Table 1 summarizes differences in cancer incidence by sex for all infants for the years 1995 to 2009 in Taiwan. A total of 900 infants were diagnosed with cancers, giving an average of 60 cases annually. The overall incidence rate was 250.71 per million person-years. The infants represented 11% (900/8193) of all childhood cancers (aged 0–14 years) (Fig 1). Overall, leukemias (56.27 per million person-years) were the most common cancer type, followed by germ cell neoplasms (43.18 per million) and neuroblastomas (41.79 per million). The three largest groups accounted for more than half (56%) of all cancers among infants. In terms of data quality indicators defined by IARC, the DCO% for all infant cancers combined fell from 6.8% in 1995 to 0% in 2009. The MV% for all cancers combined during the 15-year study period was 95.7%. In terms of MV% according to cancer type, it varied from 86.8% (retinoblastoma) to 100% (both soft tissue sarcomas and malignant bone tumors) for most of the main groups of ICCC-3, except group XII (other and unspecified neoplasms) with a MV% of only 75% (Table 2).

Bottom Line: Compared with other countries, the rate of hepatoblastoma in Taiwan was second to that from Beijing (China) and 2 to 5 times greater compared with the US, France, the North of England and Osaka (Japan).The rates of germ cell neoplasms were 2 to 4 times greater in Taiwan.The factors associated with higher rates of hepatoblastoma and germ cell neoplasms warrant further investigation on similar ethnic groups of different areas to elucidate the potential environmental impacts while controlling for race.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Pediatric Hematology and Oncology, Department of Pediatrics, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan; Department of Pediatrics, National Yang-Ming University School of Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan.

ABSTRACT

Background: Current information about cancer incidence patterns among infants in East Asia is rare. The objective of this study was to report the first population-based cancer surveillance of infants in Taiwan.

Methods: Cancer frequencies and incidence rates among subjects aged <1 year for the period 1995-2009 were obtained from the Taiwan Cancer Registry. Types of cancers were grouped according to the International Classification of Childhood Cancer. Rates and trends were analyzed by sex and disease groups and further compared with that of other countries.

Results: A total of 900 infants were diagnosed with cancers, giving an incidence rate of 250.7 per million person-years from 1995 to 2009. The male-to-female incidence rate ratio was 1.22. Overall, leukemias (56.3 per million) were the most common cancer, followed by germ cell neoplasms (43.2) and neuroblastomas (41.8). The incidence increased by 2.5% annually during the 15-year study period and was predominantly contributed by male infants (3.5%). Compared with other countries, the rate of hepatoblastoma in Taiwan was second to that from Beijing (China) and 2 to 5 times greater compared with the US, France, the North of England and Osaka (Japan). The rates of germ cell neoplasms were 2 to 4 times greater in Taiwan.

Conclusions: The current data suggests that cancer incidence rate among male infants was rising in Taiwan. The factors associated with higher rates of hepatoblastoma and germ cell neoplasms warrant further investigation on similar ethnic groups of different areas to elucidate the potential environmental impacts while controlling for race.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus