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The use of routine outcome monitoring in child semi-residential psychiatry: predicting parents' completion rates.

Lamers A, van Nieuwenhuizen C, Siebelink B, Blaauw T, Vermeiren R - Child Adolesc Psychiatry Ment Health (2015)

Bottom Line: Logistic multilevel analyses revealed initial treatment factors associated with a low completion of questionnaires by parents during ROM: high comorbidity of the child on DSM Axis I, single parenthood, a higher parental educational level and having a weaker therapeutic alliance regarding goal setting.Strong administrative and electronic support undoubtedly contributed to this result.Clinicians are encouraged to motivate parents to mutually invest in ROM, and to take into account factors indicating a possible lower completion of questionnaires by parents.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Curium-LUMC, Centre of Child and Youth Psychiatry, Leiden University, Endegeesterstraatweg 27, Oegstgeest, 2342 AK The Netherlands.

ABSTRACT

Background: Parents' perspectives on their children's treatment process and outcomes are valuable to treatment development and improvement. Participants' engagement in Routine Outcome Monitoring (ROM) has, however, been difficult and may particularly be so in specialized settings, such as semi-residential psychiatry. In this paper, the use of a web-based ROM system implemented in a child semi-residential psychiatric setting is described and predictors associated with low completion rates of questionnaires by parents are identified.

Methods: Parents and the multidisciplinary team of 46 children admitted to semi-residential psychiatric treatment participated in this study and completed a battery of questionnaires in three month intervals.

Results: The overall completion rate of both parents during ROM assessment was 77 % compared to 83 % of all clinicians involved. Completion of questionnaires by parents was higher around first assessments and declined after a year treatment. For eight clients at least one of the parents stopped filling out questionnaires during ROM measuring. Logistic multilevel analyses revealed initial treatment factors associated with a low completion of questionnaires by parents during ROM: high comorbidity of the child on DSM Axis I, single parenthood, a higher parental educational level and having a weaker therapeutic alliance regarding goal setting.

Conclusions: The findings in this paper demonstrate relatively high completion of questionnaires by clinicians and parents when using ROM in child semi-residential psychiatry. Strong administrative and electronic support undoubtedly contributed to this result. Clinicians are encouraged to motivate parents to mutually invest in ROM, and to take into account factors indicating a possible lower completion of questionnaires by parents.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Flowchart of parents’ responsiveness regarding questionnaire completion during Routine Outcome Monitoring
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Fig1: Flowchart of parents’ responsiveness regarding questionnaire completion during Routine Outcome Monitoring

Mentions: To provide an opportunity to describe “high completion” and “low completion” of parents, a cut off point was chosen at an overall completion rate of 70 %. This completion rate is based on the overall completion rates of both mothers and fathers, for each child separately, on all the assessment times. The result is two groups of clients of who parents show “low” (n = 15) and “high” (n = 31) questionnaire-completion. Of the 15 clients in the low completion group, six were at treatment location 1 and nine were at treatment location 2. Figure 1 shows the participation of parents in ROM assessments at different stages of the study. There was approximately the same number of low completion parents in the alliance strengthening group as in the treatment as usual group. In both groups there was one client with parents from a non-Dutch background. The characteristics of both groups are shown in Table 3. The low completion group involved more single parents and more children with comorbidity on Axis I in the DSM-IV classification. Also, there was more stress related to physical health problems for mothers in the low completion group. Case managers tended to experience lower therapeutic alliance with respect to the agreement made with parents regarding tasks and goals in the low completion group.Fig. 1


The use of routine outcome monitoring in child semi-residential psychiatry: predicting parents' completion rates.

Lamers A, van Nieuwenhuizen C, Siebelink B, Blaauw T, Vermeiren R - Child Adolesc Psychiatry Ment Health (2015)

Flowchart of parents’ responsiveness regarding questionnaire completion during Routine Outcome Monitoring
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4482194&req=5

Fig1: Flowchart of parents’ responsiveness regarding questionnaire completion during Routine Outcome Monitoring
Mentions: To provide an opportunity to describe “high completion” and “low completion” of parents, a cut off point was chosen at an overall completion rate of 70 %. This completion rate is based on the overall completion rates of both mothers and fathers, for each child separately, on all the assessment times. The result is two groups of clients of who parents show “low” (n = 15) and “high” (n = 31) questionnaire-completion. Of the 15 clients in the low completion group, six were at treatment location 1 and nine were at treatment location 2. Figure 1 shows the participation of parents in ROM assessments at different stages of the study. There was approximately the same number of low completion parents in the alliance strengthening group as in the treatment as usual group. In both groups there was one client with parents from a non-Dutch background. The characteristics of both groups are shown in Table 3. The low completion group involved more single parents and more children with comorbidity on Axis I in the DSM-IV classification. Also, there was more stress related to physical health problems for mothers in the low completion group. Case managers tended to experience lower therapeutic alliance with respect to the agreement made with parents regarding tasks and goals in the low completion group.Fig. 1

Bottom Line: Logistic multilevel analyses revealed initial treatment factors associated with a low completion of questionnaires by parents during ROM: high comorbidity of the child on DSM Axis I, single parenthood, a higher parental educational level and having a weaker therapeutic alliance regarding goal setting.Strong administrative and electronic support undoubtedly contributed to this result.Clinicians are encouraged to motivate parents to mutually invest in ROM, and to take into account factors indicating a possible lower completion of questionnaires by parents.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Curium-LUMC, Centre of Child and Youth Psychiatry, Leiden University, Endegeesterstraatweg 27, Oegstgeest, 2342 AK The Netherlands.

ABSTRACT

Background: Parents' perspectives on their children's treatment process and outcomes are valuable to treatment development and improvement. Participants' engagement in Routine Outcome Monitoring (ROM) has, however, been difficult and may particularly be so in specialized settings, such as semi-residential psychiatry. In this paper, the use of a web-based ROM system implemented in a child semi-residential psychiatric setting is described and predictors associated with low completion rates of questionnaires by parents are identified.

Methods: Parents and the multidisciplinary team of 46 children admitted to semi-residential psychiatric treatment participated in this study and completed a battery of questionnaires in three month intervals.

Results: The overall completion rate of both parents during ROM assessment was 77 % compared to 83 % of all clinicians involved. Completion of questionnaires by parents was higher around first assessments and declined after a year treatment. For eight clients at least one of the parents stopped filling out questionnaires during ROM measuring. Logistic multilevel analyses revealed initial treatment factors associated with a low completion of questionnaires by parents during ROM: high comorbidity of the child on DSM Axis I, single parenthood, a higher parental educational level and having a weaker therapeutic alliance regarding goal setting.

Conclusions: The findings in this paper demonstrate relatively high completion of questionnaires by clinicians and parents when using ROM in child semi-residential psychiatry. Strong administrative and electronic support undoubtedly contributed to this result. Clinicians are encouraged to motivate parents to mutually invest in ROM, and to take into account factors indicating a possible lower completion of questionnaires by parents.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus