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Period Prevalence of Ketamine-Propofol Admixture "Ketofol" in the Operating Room among Anesthesia Providers at an Academic Medical Center.

Olson AN, Rao WR, Marienau ME, Smischney NJ - Med. Sci. Monit. (2015)

Bottom Line: The period prevalence of "ketofol" was greater for sedation than induction.There was a significant reduction in barriers following education, with oral presentations being more effective than electronic only.Period prevalence was increasing following education; however, allowing more time may have shown a significant practice change.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Anesthesiology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA.

ABSTRACT

Background: The primary aim of this study was to determine the period prevalence of the single-syringe ketamine-propofol admixture used for sedation and induction among anesthesia providers during a 5-year period before and after educational sessions addressing barriers to its use. Secondary aims were to determine barriers to its use and address the most prevalent concerns through educational sessions.

Material and methods: Surveys were administered to certified and student registered nurse anesthetists, anesthesia residents, and anesthesiologists at Mayo Clinic Rochester, MN before and after educational sessions addressing common barriers. Identified barriers were addressed by oral and/or electronic presentations with identical content.

Results: Pre-education period prevalence for sedation was 110 (43%) and 64 (25%) for induction. Identified barriers were uncertainty of benefit in 62 respondents (23%), mixed controlled substance disposal in 48 (18%), regulatory/institutional policies in 20 (7%), and compatibility in 9 (3%). Post-education period prevalence for sedation was 102 (44%), and induction 63 (27%). No concerns were noted in 72% of the post-education group verses 42% in the pre-education group (p<0.01). No concerns were reported in 51% of the electronic only education group verses 64% in the oral education group (p<0.01).

Conclusions: The period prevalence of "ketofol" was greater for sedation than induction. The period prevalence following education showed a slight increase in both sedation and induction use. There was a significant reduction in barriers following education, with oral presentations being more effective than electronic only. Period prevalence was increasing following education; however, allowing more time may have shown a significant practice change.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Demographic representation of anesthesia providers at an academic medical center by title and years of anesthesia experience.
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f1-medscimonit-21-1737: Demographic representation of anesthesia providers at an academic medical center by title and years of anesthesia experience.

Mentions: There were a total of 275 respondents out of 442 potential participants (62%). Twenty-two surveys had incomplete data, leaving 253 completed surveys (57%). The study population consisted of 157 (62%) CRNAs, 34 (13%) SRNAs, 33 (13%) anesthesiologists, and 31 (12%) anesthesia residents. Out of a total 253 responses, 127 (50%) indicated they had 0–5 years of anesthetic experience, 56 (22%) had 6–10 years, 70 (28%) had greater than 10 years of experience, excluding 22 due to missing years of anesthesia training. Out of a total of 265 respondents, 99 (37%) indicated they had previous education on current knowledge or practice of the admixture (Figure 1).


Period Prevalence of Ketamine-Propofol Admixture "Ketofol" in the Operating Room among Anesthesia Providers at an Academic Medical Center.

Olson AN, Rao WR, Marienau ME, Smischney NJ - Med. Sci. Monit. (2015)

Demographic representation of anesthesia providers at an academic medical center by title and years of anesthesia experience.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4482185&req=5

f1-medscimonit-21-1737: Demographic representation of anesthesia providers at an academic medical center by title and years of anesthesia experience.
Mentions: There were a total of 275 respondents out of 442 potential participants (62%). Twenty-two surveys had incomplete data, leaving 253 completed surveys (57%). The study population consisted of 157 (62%) CRNAs, 34 (13%) SRNAs, 33 (13%) anesthesiologists, and 31 (12%) anesthesia residents. Out of a total 253 responses, 127 (50%) indicated they had 0–5 years of anesthetic experience, 56 (22%) had 6–10 years, 70 (28%) had greater than 10 years of experience, excluding 22 due to missing years of anesthesia training. Out of a total of 265 respondents, 99 (37%) indicated they had previous education on current knowledge or practice of the admixture (Figure 1).

Bottom Line: The period prevalence of "ketofol" was greater for sedation than induction.There was a significant reduction in barriers following education, with oral presentations being more effective than electronic only.Period prevalence was increasing following education; however, allowing more time may have shown a significant practice change.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Anesthesiology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA.

ABSTRACT

Background: The primary aim of this study was to determine the period prevalence of the single-syringe ketamine-propofol admixture used for sedation and induction among anesthesia providers during a 5-year period before and after educational sessions addressing barriers to its use. Secondary aims were to determine barriers to its use and address the most prevalent concerns through educational sessions.

Material and methods: Surveys were administered to certified and student registered nurse anesthetists, anesthesia residents, and anesthesiologists at Mayo Clinic Rochester, MN before and after educational sessions addressing common barriers. Identified barriers were addressed by oral and/or electronic presentations with identical content.

Results: Pre-education period prevalence for sedation was 110 (43%) and 64 (25%) for induction. Identified barriers were uncertainty of benefit in 62 respondents (23%), mixed controlled substance disposal in 48 (18%), regulatory/institutional policies in 20 (7%), and compatibility in 9 (3%). Post-education period prevalence for sedation was 102 (44%), and induction 63 (27%). No concerns were noted in 72% of the post-education group verses 42% in the pre-education group (p<0.01). No concerns were reported in 51% of the electronic only education group verses 64% in the oral education group (p<0.01).

Conclusions: The period prevalence of "ketofol" was greater for sedation than induction. The period prevalence following education showed a slight increase in both sedation and induction use. There was a significant reduction in barriers following education, with oral presentations being more effective than electronic only. Period prevalence was increasing following education; however, allowing more time may have shown a significant practice change.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus