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Long-term monitoring of feral genetically modified herbicide-tolerant Brassica napus populations around unloading Japanese ports.

Katsuta K, Matsuo K, Yoshimura Y, Ohsawa R - Breed. Sci. (2015)

Bottom Line: Genetically modified, herbicide-tolerant (GMHT) Brassica napus plants originating from seed spill have recently been found along roadsides leading from Japanese ports that unload oilseed rape.GMHT B. napus was found around 10 of 12 ports, but its proportion in the populations varied greatly by year and location.Furthermore, we found no herbicide tolerant B. juncea and B. rapa plants derived from crosses with GMHT B. napus.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Food Safety and Consumer Affairs Bureau, Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries of Japan , Kasumigaseki, Tokyo 100-8950 , Japan.

ABSTRACT
Genetically modified, herbicide-tolerant (GMHT) Brassica napus plants originating from seed spill have recently been found along roadsides leading from Japanese ports that unload oilseed rape. Such introductions have potential biodiversity effects (as defined by the Cartagena Protocol): these include replacement of native elements in the biota through competitive suppression or hybridization. We conducted surveys in the period 2006-2011 to assess such threats. We examined shifts in the population distribution and occurrence of GMHT plants in 1,029 volunteer introduced assemblages of B. napus, 1,169 of B. juncea, and 184 of B. rapa around 12 ports. GMHT B. napus was found around 10 of 12 ports, but its proportion in the populations varied greatly by year and location. Over the survey period, the distributions of a pure non-GMHT population around Tobata and a pure GMHT population around Hakata increased significantly. However, there was no common trend of population expansion or contraction around the 12 ports. Furthermore, we found no herbicide tolerant B. juncea and B. rapa plants derived from crosses with GMHT B. napus. Therefore, GMHT B. napus is not invading native vegetation surrounding its populations and not likely to cross with congeners in Japanese environment.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Time series analyses of the numbers of Brassica napus populations containing genetically modified, herbicide-tolerant (GMHT) individuals around 12 unloading Japanese ports. Temporal trends are represented by fitted regression lines (with 95% confidence envelopes). Regression fits are not provided for Tobata, Uno, Mizushima and Osaka because GMHT individuals were either absent or found only once.
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f3-65_265: Time series analyses of the numbers of Brassica napus populations containing genetically modified, herbicide-tolerant (GMHT) individuals around 12 unloading Japanese ports. Temporal trends are represented by fitted regression lines (with 95% confidence envelopes). Regression fits are not provided for Tobata, Uno, Mizushima and Osaka because GMHT individuals were either absent or found only once.

Mentions: Generalized linear model regression analyses of temporal trends in populations containing GMHT individuals are depicted in Fig. 3. Four populations (Tobata, Uno, Mizushima and Osaka) are excluded from these trend analyses because GMHT plants were either absent or occurred in only a single year. A significant positive trend was detected only in the fit for the GMHT population in Hakata; the slope gradient was gradual in this case. Overall, GMHT populations appeared not to be increasing in frequency over time.


Long-term monitoring of feral genetically modified herbicide-tolerant Brassica napus populations around unloading Japanese ports.

Katsuta K, Matsuo K, Yoshimura Y, Ohsawa R - Breed. Sci. (2015)

Time series analyses of the numbers of Brassica napus populations containing genetically modified, herbicide-tolerant (GMHT) individuals around 12 unloading Japanese ports. Temporal trends are represented by fitted regression lines (with 95% confidence envelopes). Regression fits are not provided for Tobata, Uno, Mizushima and Osaka because GMHT individuals were either absent or found only once.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4482177&req=5

f3-65_265: Time series analyses of the numbers of Brassica napus populations containing genetically modified, herbicide-tolerant (GMHT) individuals around 12 unloading Japanese ports. Temporal trends are represented by fitted regression lines (with 95% confidence envelopes). Regression fits are not provided for Tobata, Uno, Mizushima and Osaka because GMHT individuals were either absent or found only once.
Mentions: Generalized linear model regression analyses of temporal trends in populations containing GMHT individuals are depicted in Fig. 3. Four populations (Tobata, Uno, Mizushima and Osaka) are excluded from these trend analyses because GMHT plants were either absent or occurred in only a single year. A significant positive trend was detected only in the fit for the GMHT population in Hakata; the slope gradient was gradual in this case. Overall, GMHT populations appeared not to be increasing in frequency over time.

Bottom Line: Genetically modified, herbicide-tolerant (GMHT) Brassica napus plants originating from seed spill have recently been found along roadsides leading from Japanese ports that unload oilseed rape.GMHT B. napus was found around 10 of 12 ports, but its proportion in the populations varied greatly by year and location.Furthermore, we found no herbicide tolerant B. juncea and B. rapa plants derived from crosses with GMHT B. napus.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Food Safety and Consumer Affairs Bureau, Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries of Japan , Kasumigaseki, Tokyo 100-8950 , Japan.

ABSTRACT
Genetically modified, herbicide-tolerant (GMHT) Brassica napus plants originating from seed spill have recently been found along roadsides leading from Japanese ports that unload oilseed rape. Such introductions have potential biodiversity effects (as defined by the Cartagena Protocol): these include replacement of native elements in the biota through competitive suppression or hybridization. We conducted surveys in the period 2006-2011 to assess such threats. We examined shifts in the population distribution and occurrence of GMHT plants in 1,029 volunteer introduced assemblages of B. napus, 1,169 of B. juncea, and 184 of B. rapa around 12 ports. GMHT B. napus was found around 10 of 12 ports, but its proportion in the populations varied greatly by year and location. Over the survey period, the distributions of a pure non-GMHT population around Tobata and a pure GMHT population around Hakata increased significantly. However, there was no common trend of population expansion or contraction around the 12 ports. Furthermore, we found no herbicide tolerant B. juncea and B. rapa plants derived from crosses with GMHT B. napus. Therefore, GMHT B. napus is not invading native vegetation surrounding its populations and not likely to cross with congeners in Japanese environment.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus