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Retropupillary Fixation of Iris-Claw Intraocular Lens for Aphakic Eyes in Children.

Brandner M, Thaler-Saliba S, Plainer S, Vidic B, El-Shabrawi Y, Ardjomand N - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: Median final best-corrected visual acuity improved by 0.12 logMAR from preoperative baseline.Mean postoperative spherical equivalent was -0.05 ± 1.76 D.No serious complications were observed intra- or postoperatively during the entire follow-up period of up to 40 months.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Ophthalmology, Medical University Graz, Graz, Austria.

ABSTRACT

Purpose: To report outcome, complications and safety of retropupillary fixated iris-claw intraocular lenses in a pediatric population.

Design: Retrospective study.

Patients and methods: Ten consecutive pediatric patients (15 eyes) underwent placement of retropupillary fixated iris-claw intraocular lenses between October 2007 and July 2013 at the Department of Ophthalmology, Medical University Graz and General Hospital Klagenfurt, Austria. Postoperative visual acuity and complications were analyzed.

Results: Median final best-corrected visual acuity improved by 0.12 logMAR from preoperative baseline. Mean postoperative spherical equivalent was -0.05 ± 1.76 D. No serious complications were observed intra- or postoperatively during the entire follow-up period of up to 40 months. One patient experienced a haptic disenclavation with IOL subluxation immediately after a car accident.

Conclusion: Our study demonstrates that iris-claw intraocular lens implantation behind the iris is safe in children with lack of capsular support and yields excellent visual outcome with low complication rate.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Postoperative photograph of IOL decentration.The picture shows mild downward decentration of the retropupillary IOL (patient 2, right eye, arrow).
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pone.0126614.g001: Postoperative photograph of IOL decentration.The picture shows mild downward decentration of the retropupillary IOL (patient 2, right eye, arrow).

Mentions: Postoperatively, one eye (Fig 1) showed minimal IOL decentration requiring no repositioning since the patient had excellent visual acuity and did not complain about halos (patient 2). In two eyes of one patient intraocular pressure increased to 31 mmHg and 30 mmHg in the right and in the left eye, respectively, at the first postoperative day due to retained viscoelastic. Intraocular pressure decreased to 10 mmHg on both sides on the second postoperative day and stayed stable over the entire follow up period. One patient (patient 1) experienced a partial luxation of the IOL two years after implantation due to a car accident. The IOL was lifted from the vitreous through a sclerotomy with a 23G MVR blade and re-enclavated to the iris.


Retropupillary Fixation of Iris-Claw Intraocular Lens for Aphakic Eyes in Children.

Brandner M, Thaler-Saliba S, Plainer S, Vidic B, El-Shabrawi Y, Ardjomand N - PLoS ONE (2015)

Postoperative photograph of IOL decentration.The picture shows mild downward decentration of the retropupillary IOL (patient 2, right eye, arrow).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4482151&req=5

pone.0126614.g001: Postoperative photograph of IOL decentration.The picture shows mild downward decentration of the retropupillary IOL (patient 2, right eye, arrow).
Mentions: Postoperatively, one eye (Fig 1) showed minimal IOL decentration requiring no repositioning since the patient had excellent visual acuity and did not complain about halos (patient 2). In two eyes of one patient intraocular pressure increased to 31 mmHg and 30 mmHg in the right and in the left eye, respectively, at the first postoperative day due to retained viscoelastic. Intraocular pressure decreased to 10 mmHg on both sides on the second postoperative day and stayed stable over the entire follow up period. One patient (patient 1) experienced a partial luxation of the IOL two years after implantation due to a car accident. The IOL was lifted from the vitreous through a sclerotomy with a 23G MVR blade and re-enclavated to the iris.

Bottom Line: Median final best-corrected visual acuity improved by 0.12 logMAR from preoperative baseline.Mean postoperative spherical equivalent was -0.05 ± 1.76 D.No serious complications were observed intra- or postoperatively during the entire follow-up period of up to 40 months.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Ophthalmology, Medical University Graz, Graz, Austria.

ABSTRACT

Purpose: To report outcome, complications and safety of retropupillary fixated iris-claw intraocular lenses in a pediatric population.

Design: Retrospective study.

Patients and methods: Ten consecutive pediatric patients (15 eyes) underwent placement of retropupillary fixated iris-claw intraocular lenses between October 2007 and July 2013 at the Department of Ophthalmology, Medical University Graz and General Hospital Klagenfurt, Austria. Postoperative visual acuity and complications were analyzed.

Results: Median final best-corrected visual acuity improved by 0.12 logMAR from preoperative baseline. Mean postoperative spherical equivalent was -0.05 ± 1.76 D. No serious complications were observed intra- or postoperatively during the entire follow-up period of up to 40 months. One patient experienced a haptic disenclavation with IOL subluxation immediately after a car accident.

Conclusion: Our study demonstrates that iris-claw intraocular lens implantation behind the iris is safe in children with lack of capsular support and yields excellent visual outcome with low complication rate.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus