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Potential risk of residual cancer cells in the surgical treatment of initially unresectable pancreatic carcinoma after chemoradiotherapy.

Takano H, Tsuchikawa T, Nakamura T, Okamura K, Shichinohe T, Hirano S - World J Surg Oncol (2015)

Bottom Line: Overall survival from initial treatment was much better for patients with R0 resection than for patients with R1/2 resection.It was shown that tumors did not shrink continuously from the tumor front, but parts remained discontinuously at the distal portion in the process of tumor regression by chemo(radio)therapy.Achieving R0 resection will lead to an improved prognosis, and it is necessary to consider how well the extent of resection is after a favorable response to chemoradiotherapy.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Gastroenterological Surgery II, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, N-15 W-7, Sapporo, Hokkaido, 060-8638, Japan. htakano1231@yahoo.co.jp.

ABSTRACT

Background: With development of chemoradiotherapy for pancreatic carcinoma, borderline resectable or initially unresectable cases sometimes become operable after long-term intensive chemoradiotherapy. However, there is no established strategy for adjuvant surgery with respect to whether the surgical resection should be extensive or downsized accordingly with diminished disease areas following response to chemoradiotherapy.

Methods: The clinical and pathological aspects of 18 patients with initially unresectable pancreatic cancer who underwent adjuvant surgery after chemo(radio)therapy in our department from 2007 were evaluated.

Results: Overall survival from initial treatment was much better for patients with R0 resection than for patients with R1/2 resection. In two of three patients who had complete improvement of plexus (PL) invasion after chemo(radio)therapy, there had still remained pathological plexus invasion. It was shown that tumors did not shrink continuously from the tumor front, but parts remained discontinuously at the distal portion in the process of tumor regression by chemo(radio)therapy.

Conclusions: In adjuvant surgery for patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer, the potential risk of residual cancer in the regression area following chemoradiotherapy should be considered. Achieving R0 resection will lead to an improved prognosis, and it is necessary to consider how well the extent of resection is after a favorable response to chemoradiotherapy.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Overall survival from initial treatment of all patients. The 5-year survival rate is 60.3 %. The median follow-up time from initial treatment is 39 months (range: 11–92 months)
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Fig3: Overall survival from initial treatment of all patients. The 5-year survival rate is 60.3 %. The median follow-up time from initial treatment is 39 months (range: 11–92 months)

Mentions: Overall survival of all patients is shown in Fig. 3. The median follow-up time from initial treatment in all 18 patients was 39 months, and the 5-year survival rate was 60.3 %. The survival from initial treatment was significantly worse for patients with metastatic disease than for patients with locally advanced disease (P = 0.006) (Fig. 4).Fig. 3


Potential risk of residual cancer cells in the surgical treatment of initially unresectable pancreatic carcinoma after chemoradiotherapy.

Takano H, Tsuchikawa T, Nakamura T, Okamura K, Shichinohe T, Hirano S - World J Surg Oncol (2015)

Overall survival from initial treatment of all patients. The 5-year survival rate is 60.3 %. The median follow-up time from initial treatment is 39 months (range: 11–92 months)
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4482054&req=5

Fig3: Overall survival from initial treatment of all patients. The 5-year survival rate is 60.3 %. The median follow-up time from initial treatment is 39 months (range: 11–92 months)
Mentions: Overall survival of all patients is shown in Fig. 3. The median follow-up time from initial treatment in all 18 patients was 39 months, and the 5-year survival rate was 60.3 %. The survival from initial treatment was significantly worse for patients with metastatic disease than for patients with locally advanced disease (P = 0.006) (Fig. 4).Fig. 3

Bottom Line: Overall survival from initial treatment was much better for patients with R0 resection than for patients with R1/2 resection.It was shown that tumors did not shrink continuously from the tumor front, but parts remained discontinuously at the distal portion in the process of tumor regression by chemo(radio)therapy.Achieving R0 resection will lead to an improved prognosis, and it is necessary to consider how well the extent of resection is after a favorable response to chemoradiotherapy.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Gastroenterological Surgery II, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, N-15 W-7, Sapporo, Hokkaido, 060-8638, Japan. htakano1231@yahoo.co.jp.

ABSTRACT

Background: With development of chemoradiotherapy for pancreatic carcinoma, borderline resectable or initially unresectable cases sometimes become operable after long-term intensive chemoradiotherapy. However, there is no established strategy for adjuvant surgery with respect to whether the surgical resection should be extensive or downsized accordingly with diminished disease areas following response to chemoradiotherapy.

Methods: The clinical and pathological aspects of 18 patients with initially unresectable pancreatic cancer who underwent adjuvant surgery after chemo(radio)therapy in our department from 2007 were evaluated.

Results: Overall survival from initial treatment was much better for patients with R0 resection than for patients with R1/2 resection. In two of three patients who had complete improvement of plexus (PL) invasion after chemo(radio)therapy, there had still remained pathological plexus invasion. It was shown that tumors did not shrink continuously from the tumor front, but parts remained discontinuously at the distal portion in the process of tumor regression by chemo(radio)therapy.

Conclusions: In adjuvant surgery for patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer, the potential risk of residual cancer in the regression area following chemoradiotherapy should be considered. Achieving R0 resection will lead to an improved prognosis, and it is necessary to consider how well the extent of resection is after a favorable response to chemoradiotherapy.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus