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A non-contact pulse automatic positioning measurement system for traditional Chinese medicine.

Chen YY, Chang RS, Jwo KW, Hsu CC, Tsao CP - Sensors (Basel) (2015)

Bottom Line: It returns the positions of cun, guan and chi pulses automatically in terms of the amplitudes and the signals are then transformed from the time domain (time-amplitude) into the frequency domain (frequency-amplitude) via FFT to obtain the waveforms and frequencies of the cun, guan and chi pulses.It successfully extracts the data from the TCM pulse reading and can be a medical aid system for TCM.Combining the advantages of optical measurement and computer automation, this system provides a non-contact, easy to operate, fast in detection and low-cost equipment design.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Optics and Photonics of National Central University, No.300, Jhongda Rd, Taoyuan 32001, Taiwan. s102286007@dop.ncu.edu.tw.

ABSTRACT
This study is to construct a non-contact pulse automatic positioning measurement system for Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) using optical triangulation measurements. The system consists of a linear laser, a CMOS image sensor and image analysis software. The linear laser is projected on the pulse beat location on the wrists; the CMOS image sensor records the process and the software analyzes the images. The program mainly uses the optical centroid and fast Fourier transform (FFT) principles to calculate centroid changes (pulse amplitude changes) from the images taken by the CMOS image sensor. It returns the positions of cun, guan and chi pulses automatically in terms of the amplitudes and the signals are then transformed from the time domain (time-amplitude) into the frequency domain (frequency-amplitude) via FFT to obtain the waveforms and frequencies of the cun, guan and chi pulses. It successfully extracts the data from the TCM pulse reading and can be a medical aid system for TCM. Combining the advantages of optical measurement and computer automation, this system provides a non-contact, easy to operate, fast in detection and low-cost equipment design.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Band-pass filtering graph for the cun, guan and chi pulses. (a) Band-pass filtering graph for cun pulse; (b) Band-pass filtering graph for guan pulse; (c) Band-pass filtering graph for chi pulse.
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sensors-15-09899-f017: Band-pass filtering graph for the cun, guan and chi pulses. (a) Band-pass filtering graph for cun pulse; (b) Band-pass filtering graph for guan pulse; (c) Band-pass filtering graph for chi pulse.

Mentions: This study mainly applies the concept of TCM pulse reading to pulse measurement using optical triangulation. To maintain a consistent laser projection on the cun, guan and chi pulses, this system proposes a two-step aiming method: we first find the radius bone position, and then we use it as a reference in search of pulses. This originates from the description listed in Traditional Chinese Medicine, “The part slightly below the styloid process of radius bone is the guan pulse; the part anterior the guan pulse is the cun pulse, and the part posterior the guan pulse is the chi pulse [7].” Hence, we use the coordinates of the image to locate the positions of the cun, guan and chi pulses. For each measurement, we use a traditional Chinese physician’s finger to reconfirm the position of cun, guan and chi pulses, as shown in Figure 15. The actual images are captured and then analyzed by software. The locations with the three largest amplitudes changes, representing the cun, guan and chi pulses, are found and the waveforms are analyzed in the time domain (time–amplitude) which are later converted to the frequency domain (frequency–amplitude), or heartbeat rate (BPM), using a Fast Fourier Transform (FFT). As the pulse of a normal person ranges from 60 to 100 beats per minute, we set the band-pass filter at 0.7 Hz to 2.0 Hz. The program filters out signals with a frequency less than 0.7 Hz or larger than 2.0 Hz and records the main frequency and amplitude. Figure 16 shows the waveforms of different pulses detected at the cun, guan and chi locations. Figure 17 is the band-pass filtering process for the three pulses. Figure 18 is the frequency graph showing the three pulses (frequency-amplitude).


A non-contact pulse automatic positioning measurement system for traditional Chinese medicine.

Chen YY, Chang RS, Jwo KW, Hsu CC, Tsao CP - Sensors (Basel) (2015)

Band-pass filtering graph for the cun, guan and chi pulses. (a) Band-pass filtering graph for cun pulse; (b) Band-pass filtering graph for guan pulse; (c) Band-pass filtering graph for chi pulse.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4481997&req=5

sensors-15-09899-f017: Band-pass filtering graph for the cun, guan and chi pulses. (a) Band-pass filtering graph for cun pulse; (b) Band-pass filtering graph for guan pulse; (c) Band-pass filtering graph for chi pulse.
Mentions: This study mainly applies the concept of TCM pulse reading to pulse measurement using optical triangulation. To maintain a consistent laser projection on the cun, guan and chi pulses, this system proposes a two-step aiming method: we first find the radius bone position, and then we use it as a reference in search of pulses. This originates from the description listed in Traditional Chinese Medicine, “The part slightly below the styloid process of radius bone is the guan pulse; the part anterior the guan pulse is the cun pulse, and the part posterior the guan pulse is the chi pulse [7].” Hence, we use the coordinates of the image to locate the positions of the cun, guan and chi pulses. For each measurement, we use a traditional Chinese physician’s finger to reconfirm the position of cun, guan and chi pulses, as shown in Figure 15. The actual images are captured and then analyzed by software. The locations with the three largest amplitudes changes, representing the cun, guan and chi pulses, are found and the waveforms are analyzed in the time domain (time–amplitude) which are later converted to the frequency domain (frequency–amplitude), or heartbeat rate (BPM), using a Fast Fourier Transform (FFT). As the pulse of a normal person ranges from 60 to 100 beats per minute, we set the band-pass filter at 0.7 Hz to 2.0 Hz. The program filters out signals with a frequency less than 0.7 Hz or larger than 2.0 Hz and records the main frequency and amplitude. Figure 16 shows the waveforms of different pulses detected at the cun, guan and chi locations. Figure 17 is the band-pass filtering process for the three pulses. Figure 18 is the frequency graph showing the three pulses (frequency-amplitude).

Bottom Line: It returns the positions of cun, guan and chi pulses automatically in terms of the amplitudes and the signals are then transformed from the time domain (time-amplitude) into the frequency domain (frequency-amplitude) via FFT to obtain the waveforms and frequencies of the cun, guan and chi pulses.It successfully extracts the data from the TCM pulse reading and can be a medical aid system for TCM.Combining the advantages of optical measurement and computer automation, this system provides a non-contact, easy to operate, fast in detection and low-cost equipment design.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Optics and Photonics of National Central University, No.300, Jhongda Rd, Taoyuan 32001, Taiwan. s102286007@dop.ncu.edu.tw.

ABSTRACT
This study is to construct a non-contact pulse automatic positioning measurement system for Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) using optical triangulation measurements. The system consists of a linear laser, a CMOS image sensor and image analysis software. The linear laser is projected on the pulse beat location on the wrists; the CMOS image sensor records the process and the software analyzes the images. The program mainly uses the optical centroid and fast Fourier transform (FFT) principles to calculate centroid changes (pulse amplitude changes) from the images taken by the CMOS image sensor. It returns the positions of cun, guan and chi pulses automatically in terms of the amplitudes and the signals are then transformed from the time domain (time-amplitude) into the frequency domain (frequency-amplitude) via FFT to obtain the waveforms and frequencies of the cun, guan and chi pulses. It successfully extracts the data from the TCM pulse reading and can be a medical aid system for TCM. Combining the advantages of optical measurement and computer automation, this system provides a non-contact, easy to operate, fast in detection and low-cost equipment design.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus