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Smartphone applications with sensors used in a tertiary hospital-current status and future challenges.

Park YR, Lee Y, Lee G, Lee JH, Shin SY - Sensors (Basel) (2015)

Bottom Line: In addition, several healthcare apps have received FDA clearance.However, in spite of their potential, healthcare apps with smartphone-based sensors are mostly used outside of hospitals and have not been widely adopted for patient care in hospitals until recently.By analyzing the usage patterns of these apps for data entry with sensors, the current limitations of smartphone-based sensors in a clinical setting, hurdles against adoption in the medical center, benefits of smartphone-based sensors and potential future research directions could be evaluated.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Clinical Research Center, Asan Medical Center, Seoul 138-736, Korea. yurang.park@amc.seoul.kr.

ABSTRACT
Smartphones have been widely used recently to monitor heart rate and activity, since they have the necessary processing power, non-invasive and cost-effective sensors, and wireless communication capabilities. Consequently, healthcare applications (apps) using smartphone-based sensors have been highlighted for non-invasive physiological monitoring. In addition, several healthcare apps have received FDA clearance. However, in spite of their potential, healthcare apps with smartphone-based sensors are mostly used outside of hospitals and have not been widely adopted for patient care in hospitals until recently. In this paper, we describe the experience of using smartphone apps with sensors in a large medical center in Korea. Among >20 apps developed in our medical center, four were extensively analyzed ("My Cancer Diary", "Point-of-Care HIV Check", "Blood Culture" and "mAMIS"), since they use smartphone-based sensors such as the camera and barcode reader to enter data into the electronic health record system. By analyzing the usage patterns of these apps for data entry with sensors, the current limitations of smartphone-based sensors in a clinical setting, hurdles against adoption in the medical center, benefits of smartphone-based sensors and potential future research directions could be evaluated.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Usage pattern of Point-of-Care HIV check app by month.
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sensors-15-09854-f007: Usage pattern of Point-of-Care HIV check app by month.

Mentions: The “Point-of-Care HIV Check” app identifies the patient’s ID by a barcode and takes a photo of the test results using the smartphone camera. This app was released to 10 clinical nurse specialists in the emergency room [20]. This app was used 1565 times over 14 months. During this period, six HIV-infected patients were detected. Although this app demonstrated its benefits, the overall trend of usage declined slightly (refer Figure 7). The app was actively used during first six months; however, usage rapidly declined in April, 2014 when the charger of devices in the emergency room was out-of-order. This hardware problem was immediately resolved, but the app usage did not subsequently recover. Even though this app can provide a clear benefit to users, users regard the use of this app as an additional burden to their routine jobs.


Smartphone applications with sensors used in a tertiary hospital-current status and future challenges.

Park YR, Lee Y, Lee G, Lee JH, Shin SY - Sensors (Basel) (2015)

Usage pattern of Point-of-Care HIV check app by month.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4481990&req=5

sensors-15-09854-f007: Usage pattern of Point-of-Care HIV check app by month.
Mentions: The “Point-of-Care HIV Check” app identifies the patient’s ID by a barcode and takes a photo of the test results using the smartphone camera. This app was released to 10 clinical nurse specialists in the emergency room [20]. This app was used 1565 times over 14 months. During this period, six HIV-infected patients were detected. Although this app demonstrated its benefits, the overall trend of usage declined slightly (refer Figure 7). The app was actively used during first six months; however, usage rapidly declined in April, 2014 when the charger of devices in the emergency room was out-of-order. This hardware problem was immediately resolved, but the app usage did not subsequently recover. Even though this app can provide a clear benefit to users, users regard the use of this app as an additional burden to their routine jobs.

Bottom Line: In addition, several healthcare apps have received FDA clearance.However, in spite of their potential, healthcare apps with smartphone-based sensors are mostly used outside of hospitals and have not been widely adopted for patient care in hospitals until recently.By analyzing the usage patterns of these apps for data entry with sensors, the current limitations of smartphone-based sensors in a clinical setting, hurdles against adoption in the medical center, benefits of smartphone-based sensors and potential future research directions could be evaluated.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Clinical Research Center, Asan Medical Center, Seoul 138-736, Korea. yurang.park@amc.seoul.kr.

ABSTRACT
Smartphones have been widely used recently to monitor heart rate and activity, since they have the necessary processing power, non-invasive and cost-effective sensors, and wireless communication capabilities. Consequently, healthcare applications (apps) using smartphone-based sensors have been highlighted for non-invasive physiological monitoring. In addition, several healthcare apps have received FDA clearance. However, in spite of their potential, healthcare apps with smartphone-based sensors are mostly used outside of hospitals and have not been widely adopted for patient care in hospitals until recently. In this paper, we describe the experience of using smartphone apps with sensors in a large medical center in Korea. Among >20 apps developed in our medical center, four were extensively analyzed ("My Cancer Diary", "Point-of-Care HIV Check", "Blood Culture" and "mAMIS"), since they use smartphone-based sensors such as the camera and barcode reader to enter data into the electronic health record system. By analyzing the usage patterns of these apps for data entry with sensors, the current limitations of smartphone-based sensors in a clinical setting, hurdles against adoption in the medical center, benefits of smartphone-based sensors and potential future research directions could be evaluated.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus