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Surface plasmon resonance: a versatile technique for biosensor applications.

Nguyen HH, Park J, Kang S, Kim M - Sensors (Basel) (2015)

Bottom Line: Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) is a label-free detection method which has emerged during the last two decades as a suitable and reliable platform in clinical analysis for biomolecular interactions.Here we summarize the principles, provide examples, and illustrate the utility of SPR and SPRI through example applications from the biomedical, proteomics, genomics and bioengineering fields.In addition, SPR signal amplification strategies and surface functionalization are covered in the review.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: BioNanotechnology Research Center, Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology (KRIBB), Daejeon 305-806, Korea. hhiep86@kribb.re.kr.

ABSTRACT
Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) is a label-free detection method which has emerged during the last two decades as a suitable and reliable platform in clinical analysis for biomolecular interactions. The technique makes it possible to measure interactions in real-time with high sensitivity and without the need of labels. This review article discusses a wide range of applications in optical-based sensors using either surface plasmon resonance (SPR) or surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPRI). Here we summarize the principles, provide examples, and illustrate the utility of SPR and SPRI through example applications from the biomedical, proteomics, genomics and bioengineering fields. In addition, SPR signal amplification strategies and surface functionalization are covered in the review.

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Schematic diagram of an immunochemical molecular recognition to illustrate the utility of Au colloid-enhanced biosensing. Two strategies for particle-enhanced SPR immunosensing are described: (A) Direct binding of the antigen-Au complex to an antibody-modified surface; (B) Antibody-modified surface followed by binding of a free antigen and then a secondary antibody-Au conjugate. Adapted from [112].
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sensors-15-10481-f007: Schematic diagram of an immunochemical molecular recognition to illustrate the utility of Au colloid-enhanced biosensing. Two strategies for particle-enhanced SPR immunosensing are described: (A) Direct binding of the antigen-Au complex to an antibody-modified surface; (B) Antibody-modified surface followed by binding of a free antigen and then a secondary antibody-Au conjugate. Adapted from [112].

Mentions: Metallic nanoparticles, especially gold nanoparticles (Au NPs), have been widely used to improve SPR-based sensing performance over the last decade. They are employed both in sensing surface enhancement and as amplification tags. Nanoparticle amplification tags are based on the fact that, upon addition of linked Au NPs, a pseudo mass increase of analyte is induced. This mass change finally produces higher refractive index changes on the SPR surface. In the first such work by Lyon and colleagues [111], colloidal gold particles of various sizes (30–59 nm in diameter) were used to coat a 47 nm-thick Au film. The results demonstrated that with increasing particle size, the limit of detection (LOD) and the maximum level of quantitation both decreased. In another work [112], Lyon et al. conjugated anti-human immunoglobulin (h-IgG) to Au NPs for a sandwich immunoassay to detect h-IgG. It was observed that as antibody-Au colloid conjugate was added, the signal was significantly amplified by as much as 25 times. A 6.7 pM detection limit of h-IgG was achieved using this method (Figure 7). In addition to Au NPs, other metal nanoparticles including Ag NPs, SiO2 NPs [113], Pd NPs [114], and Pt NPs [17] have also been applied to increase SPR sensitivity in various biomolecular detection applications.


Surface plasmon resonance: a versatile technique for biosensor applications.

Nguyen HH, Park J, Kang S, Kim M - Sensors (Basel) (2015)

Schematic diagram of an immunochemical molecular recognition to illustrate the utility of Au colloid-enhanced biosensing. Two strategies for particle-enhanced SPR immunosensing are described: (A) Direct binding of the antigen-Au complex to an antibody-modified surface; (B) Antibody-modified surface followed by binding of a free antigen and then a secondary antibody-Au conjugate. Adapted from [112].
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4481982&req=5

sensors-15-10481-f007: Schematic diagram of an immunochemical molecular recognition to illustrate the utility of Au colloid-enhanced biosensing. Two strategies for particle-enhanced SPR immunosensing are described: (A) Direct binding of the antigen-Au complex to an antibody-modified surface; (B) Antibody-modified surface followed by binding of a free antigen and then a secondary antibody-Au conjugate. Adapted from [112].
Mentions: Metallic nanoparticles, especially gold nanoparticles (Au NPs), have been widely used to improve SPR-based sensing performance over the last decade. They are employed both in sensing surface enhancement and as amplification tags. Nanoparticle amplification tags are based on the fact that, upon addition of linked Au NPs, a pseudo mass increase of analyte is induced. This mass change finally produces higher refractive index changes on the SPR surface. In the first such work by Lyon and colleagues [111], colloidal gold particles of various sizes (30–59 nm in diameter) were used to coat a 47 nm-thick Au film. The results demonstrated that with increasing particle size, the limit of detection (LOD) and the maximum level of quantitation both decreased. In another work [112], Lyon et al. conjugated anti-human immunoglobulin (h-IgG) to Au NPs for a sandwich immunoassay to detect h-IgG. It was observed that as antibody-Au colloid conjugate was added, the signal was significantly amplified by as much as 25 times. A 6.7 pM detection limit of h-IgG was achieved using this method (Figure 7). In addition to Au NPs, other metal nanoparticles including Ag NPs, SiO2 NPs [113], Pd NPs [114], and Pt NPs [17] have also been applied to increase SPR sensitivity in various biomolecular detection applications.

Bottom Line: Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) is a label-free detection method which has emerged during the last two decades as a suitable and reliable platform in clinical analysis for biomolecular interactions.Here we summarize the principles, provide examples, and illustrate the utility of SPR and SPRI through example applications from the biomedical, proteomics, genomics and bioengineering fields.In addition, SPR signal amplification strategies and surface functionalization are covered in the review.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: BioNanotechnology Research Center, Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology (KRIBB), Daejeon 305-806, Korea. hhiep86@kribb.re.kr.

ABSTRACT
Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) is a label-free detection method which has emerged during the last two decades as a suitable and reliable platform in clinical analysis for biomolecular interactions. The technique makes it possible to measure interactions in real-time with high sensitivity and without the need of labels. This review article discusses a wide range of applications in optical-based sensors using either surface plasmon resonance (SPR) or surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPRI). Here we summarize the principles, provide examples, and illustrate the utility of SPR and SPRI through example applications from the biomedical, proteomics, genomics and bioengineering fields. In addition, SPR signal amplification strategies and surface functionalization are covered in the review.

Show MeSH