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Mobile Robot Positioning with 433-MHz Wireless Motes with Varying Transmission Powers and a Particle Filter.

Canedo-Rodriguez A, Rodriguez JM, Alvarez-Santos V, Iglesias R, Regueiro CV - Sensors (Basel) (2015)

Bottom Line: To this extent, we have designed a robot positioning system based on wireless motes.Our motes use an inexpensive, low-power sub-1-GHz system-on-chip (CC1110) working in the 433-MHz ISM band.This opens the door for applications where the robot can localize itself actively by requesting the transmitters to change their power in real time.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: CITIUS, University of Santiago de Compostela, R/ Jenaro de la Fuente Dominguez s/n, 15782 Santiago de Compostela, Spain. adrian.canedo@situm.es.

ABSTRACT
In wireless positioning systems, the transmitter's power is usually fixed. In this paper, we explore the use of varying transmission powers to increase the performance of a wireless localization system. To this extent, we have designed a robot positioning system based on wireless motes. Our motes use an inexpensive, low-power sub-1-GHz system-on-chip (CC1110) working in the 433-MHz ISM band. Our localization algorithm is based on a particle filter and infers the robot position by: (1) comparing the power received with the expected one; and (2) integrating the robot displacement. We demonstrate that the use of transmitters that vary their transmission power over time improves the performance of the wireless positioning system significantly, with respect to a system that uses fixed power transmitters. This opens the door for applications where the robot can localize itself actively by requesting the transmitters to change their power in real time.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Comparison of the performance of the algorithm using the motes (blue) and each WiFi card (yellow, green, red). (a) exy; (b) eθ; (c) %tloc.
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f9-sensors-15-10194: Comparison of the performance of the algorithm using the motes (blue) and each WiFi card (yellow, green, red). (a) exy; (b) eθ; (c) %tloc.

Mentions: Figure 9 shows the performance results of the localization with motes and WiFi. The experiments were performed using different values of the parameter λ. This parameter scales the typical deviation estimated by the GP regression (Equation (27)). Therefore, it modifies the confidence that we have in the sensor model (the greater the λ, the lower the confidence and the higher the tolerance towards noise). We can draw the following conclusions:


Mobile Robot Positioning with 433-MHz Wireless Motes with Varying Transmission Powers and a Particle Filter.

Canedo-Rodriguez A, Rodriguez JM, Alvarez-Santos V, Iglesias R, Regueiro CV - Sensors (Basel) (2015)

Comparison of the performance of the algorithm using the motes (blue) and each WiFi card (yellow, green, red). (a) exy; (b) eθ; (c) %tloc.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4481977&req=5

f9-sensors-15-10194: Comparison of the performance of the algorithm using the motes (blue) and each WiFi card (yellow, green, red). (a) exy; (b) eθ; (c) %tloc.
Mentions: Figure 9 shows the performance results of the localization with motes and WiFi. The experiments were performed using different values of the parameter λ. This parameter scales the typical deviation estimated by the GP regression (Equation (27)). Therefore, it modifies the confidence that we have in the sensor model (the greater the λ, the lower the confidence and the higher the tolerance towards noise). We can draw the following conclusions:

Bottom Line: To this extent, we have designed a robot positioning system based on wireless motes.Our motes use an inexpensive, low-power sub-1-GHz system-on-chip (CC1110) working in the 433-MHz ISM band.This opens the door for applications where the robot can localize itself actively by requesting the transmitters to change their power in real time.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: CITIUS, University of Santiago de Compostela, R/ Jenaro de la Fuente Dominguez s/n, 15782 Santiago de Compostela, Spain. adrian.canedo@situm.es.

ABSTRACT
In wireless positioning systems, the transmitter's power is usually fixed. In this paper, we explore the use of varying transmission powers to increase the performance of a wireless localization system. To this extent, we have designed a robot positioning system based on wireless motes. Our motes use an inexpensive, low-power sub-1-GHz system-on-chip (CC1110) working in the 433-MHz ISM band. Our localization algorithm is based on a particle filter and infers the robot position by: (1) comparing the power received with the expected one; and (2) integrating the robot displacement. We demonstrate that the use of transmitters that vary their transmission power over time improves the performance of the wireless positioning system significantly, with respect to a system that uses fixed power transmitters. This opens the door for applications where the robot can localize itself actively by requesting the transmitters to change their power in real time.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus