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Reversible NO2 Optical Fiber Chemical Sensor Based on LuPc2 Using Simultaneous Transmission of UV and Visible Light.

Bueno A, Lahem D, Caucheteur C, Debliquy M - Sensors (Basel) (2015)

Bottom Line: In this paper, an NO2 optical fiber sensor is presented for pollution monitoring in road traffic applications.Coatings of different thicknesses were deposited on the optical fiber tips and the best performance was obtained for a 15 nm deposited thickness, with a sensitivity of 5.02 mV/ppm and a resolution of 0.2 ppb in the range 0-5 ppm.The response and recovery times are not dependent on thickness, meaning that NO2 does not diffuse completely in the films.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Service d'Electromagnétisme et de Télécommunications, Université de Mons, Boulevard Dolez 31, 7000 Mons, Belgium. antonio.buenomartinez@umons.ac.be.

ABSTRACT
In this paper, an NO2 optical fiber sensor is presented for pollution monitoring in road traffic applications. This sensor exploits the simultaneous transmission of visible light, as a measurement signal, and UV light, for the recovery of the NO2 sensitive materials. The sensor is based on a multimode fiber tip coated with a thin film of lutetium bisphthalocyanine (LuPc2). The simultaneous injection of UV light through the fiber is an improvement on the previously developed NO2 sensors and allows the simplification of the sensor head, rendering the external UV illumination of the film unnecessary. Coatings of different thicknesses were deposited on the optical fiber tips and the best performance was obtained for a 15 nm deposited thickness, with a sensitivity of 5.02 mV/ppm and a resolution of 0.2 ppb in the range 0-5 ppm. The response and recovery times are not dependent on thickness, meaning that NO2 does not diffuse completely in the films.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Absorbance spectra of pure LuPc2 thin films (a) whole spectra; (b) zoom on 660 nm.
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sensors-15-09870-f002: Absorbance spectra of pure LuPc2 thin films (a) whole spectra; (b) zoom on 660 nm.

Mentions: Figure 2a,b show the absorbance spectra for 15 nm and 30 nm thicknesses of LuPc2 films on glass substrate, before and after contact with NO2. The film is originally green and fades to a reddish color after NO2 exposure. The spectrum is affected in the wavelength range between 400 nm and 1600 nm. Several absorption bands can be chosen to monitor optical changes. The most intense absorption band (Q band) at around 660 mm was chosen for this study. It can be seen that the strong absorption peak intensity decreases after only 1 min of NO2 exposure at a concentration of 100 ppm. This effect is reversible, but more than 24 h are needed at room temperature to recover the original spectrum. This is due to the high stability of the (LuPc2 + NO2−) complex formed between NO2 and LuPc2, which induces a slow desorption of NO2.


Reversible NO2 Optical Fiber Chemical Sensor Based on LuPc2 Using Simultaneous Transmission of UV and Visible Light.

Bueno A, Lahem D, Caucheteur C, Debliquy M - Sensors (Basel) (2015)

Absorbance spectra of pure LuPc2 thin films (a) whole spectra; (b) zoom on 660 nm.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4481967&req=5

sensors-15-09870-f002: Absorbance spectra of pure LuPc2 thin films (a) whole spectra; (b) zoom on 660 nm.
Mentions: Figure 2a,b show the absorbance spectra for 15 nm and 30 nm thicknesses of LuPc2 films on glass substrate, before and after contact with NO2. The film is originally green and fades to a reddish color after NO2 exposure. The spectrum is affected in the wavelength range between 400 nm and 1600 nm. Several absorption bands can be chosen to monitor optical changes. The most intense absorption band (Q band) at around 660 mm was chosen for this study. It can be seen that the strong absorption peak intensity decreases after only 1 min of NO2 exposure at a concentration of 100 ppm. This effect is reversible, but more than 24 h are needed at room temperature to recover the original spectrum. This is due to the high stability of the (LuPc2 + NO2−) complex formed between NO2 and LuPc2, which induces a slow desorption of NO2.

Bottom Line: In this paper, an NO2 optical fiber sensor is presented for pollution monitoring in road traffic applications.Coatings of different thicknesses were deposited on the optical fiber tips and the best performance was obtained for a 15 nm deposited thickness, with a sensitivity of 5.02 mV/ppm and a resolution of 0.2 ppb in the range 0-5 ppm.The response and recovery times are not dependent on thickness, meaning that NO2 does not diffuse completely in the films.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Service d'Electromagnétisme et de Télécommunications, Université de Mons, Boulevard Dolez 31, 7000 Mons, Belgium. antonio.buenomartinez@umons.ac.be.

ABSTRACT
In this paper, an NO2 optical fiber sensor is presented for pollution monitoring in road traffic applications. This sensor exploits the simultaneous transmission of visible light, as a measurement signal, and UV light, for the recovery of the NO2 sensitive materials. The sensor is based on a multimode fiber tip coated with a thin film of lutetium bisphthalocyanine (LuPc2). The simultaneous injection of UV light through the fiber is an improvement on the previously developed NO2 sensors and allows the simplification of the sensor head, rendering the external UV illumination of the film unnecessary. Coatings of different thicknesses were deposited on the optical fiber tips and the best performance was obtained for a 15 nm deposited thickness, with a sensitivity of 5.02 mV/ppm and a resolution of 0.2 ppb in the range 0-5 ppm. The response and recovery times are not dependent on thickness, meaning that NO2 does not diffuse completely in the films.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus