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Field effect sensors for nucleic Acid detection: recent advances and future perspectives.

Veigas B, Fortunato E, Baptista PV - Sensors (Basel) (2015)

Bottom Line: In the last decade the use of field-effect-based devices has become a basic structural element in a new generation of biosensors that allow label-free DNA analysis.In particular, ion sensitive field effect transistors (FET) are the basis for the development of radical new approaches for the specific detection and characterization of DNA due to FETs' greater signal-to-noise ratio, fast measurement capabilities, and possibility to be included in portable instrumentation.This limitation is sometimes considered to be fundamental for FET devices and considerable efforts have been made to develop better architectures.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Nanomedicine@FCT, UCIBIO, Departamento de Ciências da Vida, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Campus de Caparica, Caparica 2829-516, Portugal. emf@fct.unl.pt.

ABSTRACT
In the last decade the use of field-effect-based devices has become a basic structural element in a new generation of biosensors that allow label-free DNA analysis. In particular, ion sensitive field effect transistors (FET) are the basis for the development of radical new approaches for the specific detection and characterization of DNA due to FETs' greater signal-to-noise ratio, fast measurement capabilities, and possibility to be included in portable instrumentation. Reliable molecular characterization of DNA and/or RNA is vital for disease diagnostics and to follow up alterations in gene expression profiles. FET biosensors may become a relevant tool for molecular diagnostics and at point-of-care. The development of these devices and strategies should be carefully designed, as biomolecular recognition and detection events must occur within the Debye length. This limitation is sometimes considered to be fundamental for FET devices and considerable efforts have been made to develop better architectures. Herein we review the use of field effect sensors for nucleic acid detection strategies-from production and functionalization to integration in molecular diagnostics platforms, with special focus on those that have made their way into the diagnostics lab.

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Schematic structure of a DNA modified thin film field effect device and the principle of DNA-hybridization detection. The change in DNA content, due to hybridization, yields a local charge variation and a rearrangement of ionic species near the sensor surface that modulate the sensor's response.
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sensors-15-10380-f004: Schematic structure of a DNA modified thin film field effect device and the principle of DNA-hybridization detection. The change in DNA content, due to hybridization, yields a local charge variation and a rearrangement of ionic species near the sensor surface that modulate the sensor's response.

Mentions: Most DNA detection techniques are based on a DNA hybridization process, where a specific single stranded DNA (ssDNA) molecules—probe—recognizes the complementary strand mediated by mostly Watson and Crick base pairing events. Detection of hybridization is usually achieved by DNA modified FED via immobilizing probes onto the sensor’s surface. Because DNA is an intrinsically charged molecule due to the phosphate backbone, the charge density increases near the sensor’s surface yielding a response (Figure 4) [3].


Field effect sensors for nucleic Acid detection: recent advances and future perspectives.

Veigas B, Fortunato E, Baptista PV - Sensors (Basel) (2015)

Schematic structure of a DNA modified thin film field effect device and the principle of DNA-hybridization detection. The change in DNA content, due to hybridization, yields a local charge variation and a rearrangement of ionic species near the sensor surface that modulate the sensor's response.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4481962&req=5

sensors-15-10380-f004: Schematic structure of a DNA modified thin film field effect device and the principle of DNA-hybridization detection. The change in DNA content, due to hybridization, yields a local charge variation and a rearrangement of ionic species near the sensor surface that modulate the sensor's response.
Mentions: Most DNA detection techniques are based on a DNA hybridization process, where a specific single stranded DNA (ssDNA) molecules—probe—recognizes the complementary strand mediated by mostly Watson and Crick base pairing events. Detection of hybridization is usually achieved by DNA modified FED via immobilizing probes onto the sensor’s surface. Because DNA is an intrinsically charged molecule due to the phosphate backbone, the charge density increases near the sensor’s surface yielding a response (Figure 4) [3].

Bottom Line: In the last decade the use of field-effect-based devices has become a basic structural element in a new generation of biosensors that allow label-free DNA analysis.In particular, ion sensitive field effect transistors (FET) are the basis for the development of radical new approaches for the specific detection and characterization of DNA due to FETs' greater signal-to-noise ratio, fast measurement capabilities, and possibility to be included in portable instrumentation.This limitation is sometimes considered to be fundamental for FET devices and considerable efforts have been made to develop better architectures.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Nanomedicine@FCT, UCIBIO, Departamento de Ciências da Vida, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Campus de Caparica, Caparica 2829-516, Portugal. emf@fct.unl.pt.

ABSTRACT
In the last decade the use of field-effect-based devices has become a basic structural element in a new generation of biosensors that allow label-free DNA analysis. In particular, ion sensitive field effect transistors (FET) are the basis for the development of radical new approaches for the specific detection and characterization of DNA due to FETs' greater signal-to-noise ratio, fast measurement capabilities, and possibility to be included in portable instrumentation. Reliable molecular characterization of DNA and/or RNA is vital for disease diagnostics and to follow up alterations in gene expression profiles. FET biosensors may become a relevant tool for molecular diagnostics and at point-of-care. The development of these devices and strategies should be carefully designed, as biomolecular recognition and detection events must occur within the Debye length. This limitation is sometimes considered to be fundamental for FET devices and considerable efforts have been made to develop better architectures. Herein we review the use of field effect sensors for nucleic acid detection strategies-from production and functionalization to integration in molecular diagnostics platforms, with special focus on those that have made their way into the diagnostics lab.

Show MeSH