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A micro-computed tomography technique to study the quality of fibre optics embedded in composite materials.

Chiesura G, Luyckx G, Voet E, Lammens N, Van Paepegem W, Degrieck J, Dierick M, Van Hoorebeke L, Vanderniepen P, Sulejmani S, Sonnenfeld C, Geernaert T, Berghmans F - Sensors (Basel) (2015)

Bottom Line: Quality of embedment of optical fibre sensors in carbon fibre-reinforced polymers plays an important role in the resultant properties of the composite, as well as for the correct monitoring of the structure.Therefore, availability of a tool able to check the optical fibre sensor-composite interaction becomes essential.In this work the feasibility of inspecting the position, the orientation and, more generally, the quality of the embedment of an optical fibre sensor in a carbon fibre reinforced laminate at unit cell level have been proven.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Material Science and Engineering, Ghent University, Technologiepark 903, 9052 Gent-Zwijnaarde, Belgium. gachiesu.Chiesura@ugent.be.

ABSTRACT
Quality of embedment of optical fibre sensors in carbon fibre-reinforced polymers plays an important role in the resultant properties of the composite, as well as for the correct monitoring of the structure. Therefore, availability of a tool able to check the optical fibre sensor-composite interaction becomes essential. High-resolution 3D X-ray Micro-Computed Tomography, or Micro-CT, is a relatively new non-destructive inspection technique which enables investigations of the internal structure of a sample without actually compromising its integrity. In this work the feasibility of inspecting the position, the orientation and, more generally, the quality of the embedment of an optical fibre sensor in a carbon fibre reinforced laminate at unit cell level have been proven.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

(a) 2D cross section reconstruction taken from a micro-CT performed on a CFRP prepreg M18/M55J cross-ply laminate with a coated OFS embedded in the mid-plane and (b) enlargement of its surroundings; (c) 3D volume rendering of approximately 1 × 1 × 4 mm3, which allows arbitrary virtual cross sectioning.
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sensors-15-10852-f007: (a) 2D cross section reconstruction taken from a micro-CT performed on a CFRP prepreg M18/M55J cross-ply laminate with a coated OFS embedded in the mid-plane and (b) enlargement of its surroundings; (c) 3D volume rendering of approximately 1 × 1 × 4 mm3, which allows arbitrary virtual cross sectioning.

Mentions: In this section, the results are shown for a micro-CT scan of the area around an optical fibre Bragg grating sensor, which has been embedded in a CFRP prepreg M18/M55J cross-ply laminate. The fibre provided (from FBGS Technologies GmbH (Jena, Germany) [29] in the framework of collaboration within the FP7 SmartFiber European project [30]) was a Draw Tower grating® (DTG) sensor, coated with Ormocer® (i.e., Organig modified Ceramic) material and having a cladding diameter of 80 µm and a coating diameter of 190 µm. In Figure 7a a reconstructed and post-processed cross-section, referring to the above mentioned Micro-Computed Tomography, is presented along with its 3D rendering. The FBG sensor has been positioned in the laminate mid-plane, between two 0° layers (i.e., cross-ply [90,0]2s). The laminate has been manufactured by an autoclave cycle imposing a maximum curing temperature of 180 °C, an external pressure of 5 bars and a vacuum level of about −85 kPa. After production, several samples were cut with a diamond saw from the plate at a proper width, according to the requirements of the micro-CT setup. Ideally in order to obtain a voxel pitch of 2 µm and a good quality scan, the material thickness surrounding the OF should be homogeneous in all directions, allowing the X-rays to travel across the same path (i.e., same attenuation). On the other hand, technological limitations allowed us to reach a minimum cutting width of 10 mm. The resultant sample dimensions were of w × t × l = 10 × 2 × 250 mm. The final rendered volume was limited to about 3 × 2 × 4 mm3. The scan was repeated at different location on the sample, namely at the top, at the centre and at the bottom of its length. A reconstructed cross-section of the scan in the central region of the specimen is depicted in Figure 7a.


A micro-computed tomography technique to study the quality of fibre optics embedded in composite materials.

Chiesura G, Luyckx G, Voet E, Lammens N, Van Paepegem W, Degrieck J, Dierick M, Van Hoorebeke L, Vanderniepen P, Sulejmani S, Sonnenfeld C, Geernaert T, Berghmans F - Sensors (Basel) (2015)

(a) 2D cross section reconstruction taken from a micro-CT performed on a CFRP prepreg M18/M55J cross-ply laminate with a coated OFS embedded in the mid-plane and (b) enlargement of its surroundings; (c) 3D volume rendering of approximately 1 × 1 × 4 mm3, which allows arbitrary virtual cross sectioning.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4481895&req=5

sensors-15-10852-f007: (a) 2D cross section reconstruction taken from a micro-CT performed on a CFRP prepreg M18/M55J cross-ply laminate with a coated OFS embedded in the mid-plane and (b) enlargement of its surroundings; (c) 3D volume rendering of approximately 1 × 1 × 4 mm3, which allows arbitrary virtual cross sectioning.
Mentions: In this section, the results are shown for a micro-CT scan of the area around an optical fibre Bragg grating sensor, which has been embedded in a CFRP prepreg M18/M55J cross-ply laminate. The fibre provided (from FBGS Technologies GmbH (Jena, Germany) [29] in the framework of collaboration within the FP7 SmartFiber European project [30]) was a Draw Tower grating® (DTG) sensor, coated with Ormocer® (i.e., Organig modified Ceramic) material and having a cladding diameter of 80 µm and a coating diameter of 190 µm. In Figure 7a a reconstructed and post-processed cross-section, referring to the above mentioned Micro-Computed Tomography, is presented along with its 3D rendering. The FBG sensor has been positioned in the laminate mid-plane, between two 0° layers (i.e., cross-ply [90,0]2s). The laminate has been manufactured by an autoclave cycle imposing a maximum curing temperature of 180 °C, an external pressure of 5 bars and a vacuum level of about −85 kPa. After production, several samples were cut with a diamond saw from the plate at a proper width, according to the requirements of the micro-CT setup. Ideally in order to obtain a voxel pitch of 2 µm and a good quality scan, the material thickness surrounding the OF should be homogeneous in all directions, allowing the X-rays to travel across the same path (i.e., same attenuation). On the other hand, technological limitations allowed us to reach a minimum cutting width of 10 mm. The resultant sample dimensions were of w × t × l = 10 × 2 × 250 mm. The final rendered volume was limited to about 3 × 2 × 4 mm3. The scan was repeated at different location on the sample, namely at the top, at the centre and at the bottom of its length. A reconstructed cross-section of the scan in the central region of the specimen is depicted in Figure 7a.

Bottom Line: Quality of embedment of optical fibre sensors in carbon fibre-reinforced polymers plays an important role in the resultant properties of the composite, as well as for the correct monitoring of the structure.Therefore, availability of a tool able to check the optical fibre sensor-composite interaction becomes essential.In this work the feasibility of inspecting the position, the orientation and, more generally, the quality of the embedment of an optical fibre sensor in a carbon fibre reinforced laminate at unit cell level have been proven.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Material Science and Engineering, Ghent University, Technologiepark 903, 9052 Gent-Zwijnaarde, Belgium. gachiesu.Chiesura@ugent.be.

ABSTRACT
Quality of embedment of optical fibre sensors in carbon fibre-reinforced polymers plays an important role in the resultant properties of the composite, as well as for the correct monitoring of the structure. Therefore, availability of a tool able to check the optical fibre sensor-composite interaction becomes essential. High-resolution 3D X-ray Micro-Computed Tomography, or Micro-CT, is a relatively new non-destructive inspection technique which enables investigations of the internal structure of a sample without actually compromising its integrity. In this work the feasibility of inspecting the position, the orientation and, more generally, the quality of the embedment of an optical fibre sensor in a carbon fibre reinforced laminate at unit cell level have been proven.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus