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Clinical outcomes and efficacy of transforaminal lumbar endoscopic discectomy.

Türk CÇ, Kara NN, Biliciler B, Karasoy M - J Neurosci Rural Pract (2015 Jul-Sep)

Bottom Line: This study concentrated on our experience regarding the outcomes and efficacy of TLED.There were significant decreases between the preoperative VAS scores collected postoperatively at 6 months (2.3) and those collected after 1-year (2.5).Transforaminal lumbar endoscopic discectomy is a safe and effective alternative to microdiscectomy that is associated with minor tissue trauma.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neurosurgery Clinic, Ministry of Health Antalya Education and Research Hospital, Antalya, Turkey.

ABSTRACT

Background: Transforaminal lumbar endoscopic discectomy (TLED) is a minimally invasive procedure for removing lumbar disc herniations. This technique was initially reserved for herniations in the foraminal or extraforaminal region. This study concentrated on our experience regarding the outcomes and efficacy of TLED.

Materials and methods: A total of 105 patients were included in the study. The patients were retrospectively evaluated for demographic features, lesion levels, numbers of affected levels, visual analog scores (VASs), Oswestry disability questionnaire scale scores and MacNab pain relief scores.

Results: A total of 48 female and 57 male patients aged between 25 and 64 years (mean: 41.8 years) underwent TLED procedures. The majority (83%) of the cases were operated on at the levels of L4-5 and L5-S1. Five patients had herniations at two levels. There were significant decreases between the preoperative VAS scores collected postoperatively at 6 months (2.3) and those collected after 1-year (2.5). Two patients were referred for microdiscectomy after TLED due to unsatisfactory pain relief on the 1(st) postoperative day. The overall success rate with respect to pain relief was 90.4% (95/105). Seven patients with previous histories of open discectomy at the same level reported fair pain relief after TLED.

Conclusions: Transforaminal lumbar endoscopic discectomy is a safe and effective alternative to microdiscectomy that is associated with minor tissue trauma. Herniations that involved single levels and foraminal/extraforaminal localizations were associated with better responses to TLED.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Preoperative sagittal (a) and axial T2-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) images (b) showing a right L4-5 lumbar disc herniation. Postoperative 1-year follow-up sagittal (c) and axial T2-weighted MR images (d)
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Figure 2: Preoperative sagittal (a) and axial T2-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) images (b) showing a right L4-5 lumbar disc herniation. Postoperative 1-year follow-up sagittal (c) and axial T2-weighted MR images (d)

Mentions: All of the TLED procedures were performed with the Joimax TESSYS™ endoscopic system [Figures 1 and 2]. The surgical technique has been discussed and described in various previous articles.[89] For the technical details specific to the L5-S1 level, the reader should see the Yeung and Tsou article.[3]


Clinical outcomes and efficacy of transforaminal lumbar endoscopic discectomy.

Türk CÇ, Kara NN, Biliciler B, Karasoy M - J Neurosci Rural Pract (2015 Jul-Sep)

Preoperative sagittal (a) and axial T2-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) images (b) showing a right L4-5 lumbar disc herniation. Postoperative 1-year follow-up sagittal (c) and axial T2-weighted MR images (d)
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4481788&req=5

Figure 2: Preoperative sagittal (a) and axial T2-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) images (b) showing a right L4-5 lumbar disc herniation. Postoperative 1-year follow-up sagittal (c) and axial T2-weighted MR images (d)
Mentions: All of the TLED procedures were performed with the Joimax TESSYS™ endoscopic system [Figures 1 and 2]. The surgical technique has been discussed and described in various previous articles.[89] For the technical details specific to the L5-S1 level, the reader should see the Yeung and Tsou article.[3]

Bottom Line: This study concentrated on our experience regarding the outcomes and efficacy of TLED.There were significant decreases between the preoperative VAS scores collected postoperatively at 6 months (2.3) and those collected after 1-year (2.5).Transforaminal lumbar endoscopic discectomy is a safe and effective alternative to microdiscectomy that is associated with minor tissue trauma.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neurosurgery Clinic, Ministry of Health Antalya Education and Research Hospital, Antalya, Turkey.

ABSTRACT

Background: Transforaminal lumbar endoscopic discectomy (TLED) is a minimally invasive procedure for removing lumbar disc herniations. This technique was initially reserved for herniations in the foraminal or extraforaminal region. This study concentrated on our experience regarding the outcomes and efficacy of TLED.

Materials and methods: A total of 105 patients were included in the study. The patients were retrospectively evaluated for demographic features, lesion levels, numbers of affected levels, visual analog scores (VASs), Oswestry disability questionnaire scale scores and MacNab pain relief scores.

Results: A total of 48 female and 57 male patients aged between 25 and 64 years (mean: 41.8 years) underwent TLED procedures. The majority (83%) of the cases were operated on at the levels of L4-5 and L5-S1. Five patients had herniations at two levels. There were significant decreases between the preoperative VAS scores collected postoperatively at 6 months (2.3) and those collected after 1-year (2.5). Two patients were referred for microdiscectomy after TLED due to unsatisfactory pain relief on the 1(st) postoperative day. The overall success rate with respect to pain relief was 90.4% (95/105). Seven patients with previous histories of open discectomy at the same level reported fair pain relief after TLED.

Conclusions: Transforaminal lumbar endoscopic discectomy is a safe and effective alternative to microdiscectomy that is associated with minor tissue trauma. Herniations that involved single levels and foraminal/extraforaminal localizations were associated with better responses to TLED.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus