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Relationships among indoor, outdoor, and personal airborne Japanese cedar pollen counts.

Yamamoto N, Matsuki Y, Yokoyama H, Matsuki H - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: We conducted a 4-year monitoring campaign to quantify indoor, outdoor, and personal airborne cedar pollen counts, where the personal passive settling sampler that has been previously validated against a volumetric sampler was used to count airborne pollen grains.Medians of the seasonally-integrated indoor-to-outdoor, personal-to-outdoor, and personal-to-indoor ratios of airborne pollen counts measured for 9 subjects were 0.08, 0.10, and 1.19, respectively.The personal pollen counts differed substantially among the human subjects (49% geometric coefficient of variation), in part due to the variability in the indoor counts that have been found as major determinants of the personal pollen counts.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Seoul National University, 1 Gwanak-ro, Gwanak-gu, Seoul, Korea.

ABSTRACT
Japanese cedar pollinosis (JCP) is an important illness caused by the inhalation of airborne allergenic cedar pollens, which are dispersed in the early spring throughout the Japanese islands. However, associations between pollen exposures and the prevalence or severity of allergic symptoms are largely unknown, due to a lack of understanding regarding personal pollen exposures in relation to indoor and outdoor concentrations. This study aims to examine the relationships among indoor, outdoor, and personal airborne Japanese cedar pollen counts. We conducted a 4-year monitoring campaign to quantify indoor, outdoor, and personal airborne cedar pollen counts, where the personal passive settling sampler that has been previously validated against a volumetric sampler was used to count airborne pollen grains. A total of 256 sets of indoor, outdoor, and personal samples (768 samples) were collected from 9 subjects. Medians of the seasonally-integrated indoor-to-outdoor, personal-to-outdoor, and personal-to-indoor ratios of airborne pollen counts measured for 9 subjects were 0.08, 0.10, and 1.19, respectively. A greater correlation was observed between the personal and indoor counts (r = 0.89) than between the personal and outdoor counts (r = 0.71), suggesting a potential inaccuracy in the use of outdoor counts as a basis for estimating personal exposures. The personal pollen counts differed substantially among the human subjects (49% geometric coefficient of variation), in part due to the variability in the indoor counts that have been found as major determinants of the personal pollen counts. The findings of this study highlight the need for pollen monitoring in proximity to human subjects to better understand the relationships between pollen exposures and the prevalence or severity of pollen allergy.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Airborne pollen concentrations and counts during the study periods.Ambient pollen concentrations (pollens m-3) were monitored at the three stationary monitoring stations of the Japanese government (a). Outdoor (b), indoor (c), and personal (d) pollen counts (pollens cm-2 day-1) were measured for each subject in Isehara. Each black line represents data for each subject.
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pone.0131710.g003: Airborne pollen concentrations and counts during the study periods.Ambient pollen concentrations (pollens m-3) were monitored at the three stationary monitoring stations of the Japanese government (a). Outdoor (b), indoor (c), and personal (d) pollen counts (pollens cm-2 day-1) were measured for each subject in Isehara. Each black line represents data for each subject.

Mentions: A total of 768 indoor, outdoor, and personal pollen samples were collected from 9 subjects over the 4-year monitoring campaign. Fig 3 shows the time-course of the ambient concentrations, and indoor, outdoor, and personal counts of airborne cedar pollens observed during the 4-year study period. The time-course tendencies in the pollen concentrations and counts differed in each year. At the Atsugi station, the highest outdoor concentration in 2010 was observed on February 8, whereas the highest concentrations in 2012 and 2013 were found in March (Fig 3a). In 2011, two distinct peaks were observed on February 24 and April 11. Similar tendencies were observed for the indoor, outdoor, and personal counts measured by the PAAS among the study subjects (Fig 3b–3d). We also observed the days with the peak indoor and personal pollen counts were preceded by the days with the peak outdoor pollen counts. This tendency was distinct in 2013, with the peak outdoor count observed on March 7 followed by the peak indoor and personal counts on March 11.


Relationships among indoor, outdoor, and personal airborne Japanese cedar pollen counts.

Yamamoto N, Matsuki Y, Yokoyama H, Matsuki H - PLoS ONE (2015)

Airborne pollen concentrations and counts during the study periods.Ambient pollen concentrations (pollens m-3) were monitored at the three stationary monitoring stations of the Japanese government (a). Outdoor (b), indoor (c), and personal (d) pollen counts (pollens cm-2 day-1) were measured for each subject in Isehara. Each black line represents data for each subject.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4481528&req=5

pone.0131710.g003: Airborne pollen concentrations and counts during the study periods.Ambient pollen concentrations (pollens m-3) were monitored at the three stationary monitoring stations of the Japanese government (a). Outdoor (b), indoor (c), and personal (d) pollen counts (pollens cm-2 day-1) were measured for each subject in Isehara. Each black line represents data for each subject.
Mentions: A total of 768 indoor, outdoor, and personal pollen samples were collected from 9 subjects over the 4-year monitoring campaign. Fig 3 shows the time-course of the ambient concentrations, and indoor, outdoor, and personal counts of airborne cedar pollens observed during the 4-year study period. The time-course tendencies in the pollen concentrations and counts differed in each year. At the Atsugi station, the highest outdoor concentration in 2010 was observed on February 8, whereas the highest concentrations in 2012 and 2013 were found in March (Fig 3a). In 2011, two distinct peaks were observed on February 24 and April 11. Similar tendencies were observed for the indoor, outdoor, and personal counts measured by the PAAS among the study subjects (Fig 3b–3d). We also observed the days with the peak indoor and personal pollen counts were preceded by the days with the peak outdoor pollen counts. This tendency was distinct in 2013, with the peak outdoor count observed on March 7 followed by the peak indoor and personal counts on March 11.

Bottom Line: We conducted a 4-year monitoring campaign to quantify indoor, outdoor, and personal airborne cedar pollen counts, where the personal passive settling sampler that has been previously validated against a volumetric sampler was used to count airborne pollen grains.Medians of the seasonally-integrated indoor-to-outdoor, personal-to-outdoor, and personal-to-indoor ratios of airborne pollen counts measured for 9 subjects were 0.08, 0.10, and 1.19, respectively.The personal pollen counts differed substantially among the human subjects (49% geometric coefficient of variation), in part due to the variability in the indoor counts that have been found as major determinants of the personal pollen counts.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Seoul National University, 1 Gwanak-ro, Gwanak-gu, Seoul, Korea.

ABSTRACT
Japanese cedar pollinosis (JCP) is an important illness caused by the inhalation of airborne allergenic cedar pollens, which are dispersed in the early spring throughout the Japanese islands. However, associations between pollen exposures and the prevalence or severity of allergic symptoms are largely unknown, due to a lack of understanding regarding personal pollen exposures in relation to indoor and outdoor concentrations. This study aims to examine the relationships among indoor, outdoor, and personal airborne Japanese cedar pollen counts. We conducted a 4-year monitoring campaign to quantify indoor, outdoor, and personal airborne cedar pollen counts, where the personal passive settling sampler that has been previously validated against a volumetric sampler was used to count airborne pollen grains. A total of 256 sets of indoor, outdoor, and personal samples (768 samples) were collected from 9 subjects. Medians of the seasonally-integrated indoor-to-outdoor, personal-to-outdoor, and personal-to-indoor ratios of airborne pollen counts measured for 9 subjects were 0.08, 0.10, and 1.19, respectively. A greater correlation was observed between the personal and indoor counts (r = 0.89) than between the personal and outdoor counts (r = 0.71), suggesting a potential inaccuracy in the use of outdoor counts as a basis for estimating personal exposures. The personal pollen counts differed substantially among the human subjects (49% geometric coefficient of variation), in part due to the variability in the indoor counts that have been found as major determinants of the personal pollen counts. The findings of this study highlight the need for pollen monitoring in proximity to human subjects to better understand the relationships between pollen exposures and the prevalence or severity of pollen allergy.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus