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Saturated, Monounsaturated and Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids Intake and Risk of Pancreatic Cancer: Evidence from Observational Studies.

Yao X, Tian Z - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: Random- or fixed-effects models were used to estimate the relative risks (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs).We found no evidence of publication bias.Further large prospective studies are warranted to report the results stratified by the subtypes of MUFA and PUFA and adjust for other potential risk factors to eliminate residual confounding.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of General Surgery, Shengjing Hospital, China Medical University, Shenyang, P. R. China.

ABSTRACT

Background: Although the relationship between dietary monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFAs), polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), and saturated fatty acids (SFAs) intake and pancreatic cancer risk has been reported by several studies, the evidence is controversial. We firstly conducted this comprehensive meta-analysis to summarize the aforementioned evidence from observational studies.

Methods: The MEDLINE (PubMed), Embase, and ISI Web of Science databases were used to search for epidemiological studies of dietary SFA, MUFA, and PUFA and pancreatic cancer risk that were published until the end of June 2014. Random- or fixed-effects models were used to estimate the relative risks (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). We also carried out subgroup, sensitivity, and publication bias analyses.

Results: We identified 13 case-control studies and 7 prospective studies which including 6270 pancreatic cancer cases in the meta-analysis of SFA, MUFA, and PUFA and risk of pancreatic cancer. The summary RR was 1.13 (95%CI = 0.94-1.35, I2 = 70.7%) for SFA, 1.00 (95%CI = 0.87-1.14, I2 = 43.4%) for MUFA, and 0.87 (95%CI = 0.75-1.00, I2 = 55.3%) for PUFA for high versus low intake categories. We found no evidence of publication bias.

Conclusion: In summary, findings of this study supports an inverse association between diets high in PUFA and pancreatic cancer risk. Further large prospective studies are warranted to report the results stratified by the subtypes of MUFA and PUFA and adjust for other potential risk factors to eliminate residual confounding.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Flow-chart of study selection.
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pone.0130870.g001: Flow-chart of study selection.

Mentions: Two investigators (XY and ZT) independently evaluated the titles and abstracts of potentially studies using the following inclusion criteria: (1) the study had a cohort/case-cohort/nested case-control/case-control study design; (2) the exposure was dietary SFA, MUFA, or PUFA intake; (3) the outcome was the incidence of pancreatic cancer; and (4) provided relative risks (RRs), odds ratios (ORs), and hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). If multiple articles were based on the same study population, the one with more informative data was selected. We identified 20 potentially relevant studies [12,15,17,19–35] from 5062 articles (Fig 1).


Saturated, Monounsaturated and Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids Intake and Risk of Pancreatic Cancer: Evidence from Observational Studies.

Yao X, Tian Z - PLoS ONE (2015)

Flow-chart of study selection.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4481405&req=5

pone.0130870.g001: Flow-chart of study selection.
Mentions: Two investigators (XY and ZT) independently evaluated the titles and abstracts of potentially studies using the following inclusion criteria: (1) the study had a cohort/case-cohort/nested case-control/case-control study design; (2) the exposure was dietary SFA, MUFA, or PUFA intake; (3) the outcome was the incidence of pancreatic cancer; and (4) provided relative risks (RRs), odds ratios (ORs), and hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). If multiple articles were based on the same study population, the one with more informative data was selected. We identified 20 potentially relevant studies [12,15,17,19–35] from 5062 articles (Fig 1).

Bottom Line: Random- or fixed-effects models were used to estimate the relative risks (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs).We found no evidence of publication bias.Further large prospective studies are warranted to report the results stratified by the subtypes of MUFA and PUFA and adjust for other potential risk factors to eliminate residual confounding.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of General Surgery, Shengjing Hospital, China Medical University, Shenyang, P. R. China.

ABSTRACT

Background: Although the relationship between dietary monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFAs), polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), and saturated fatty acids (SFAs) intake and pancreatic cancer risk has been reported by several studies, the evidence is controversial. We firstly conducted this comprehensive meta-analysis to summarize the aforementioned evidence from observational studies.

Methods: The MEDLINE (PubMed), Embase, and ISI Web of Science databases were used to search for epidemiological studies of dietary SFA, MUFA, and PUFA and pancreatic cancer risk that were published until the end of June 2014. Random- or fixed-effects models were used to estimate the relative risks (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). We also carried out subgroup, sensitivity, and publication bias analyses.

Results: We identified 13 case-control studies and 7 prospective studies which including 6270 pancreatic cancer cases in the meta-analysis of SFA, MUFA, and PUFA and risk of pancreatic cancer. The summary RR was 1.13 (95%CI = 0.94-1.35, I2 = 70.7%) for SFA, 1.00 (95%CI = 0.87-1.14, I2 = 43.4%) for MUFA, and 0.87 (95%CI = 0.75-1.00, I2 = 55.3%) for PUFA for high versus low intake categories. We found no evidence of publication bias.

Conclusion: In summary, findings of this study supports an inverse association between diets high in PUFA and pancreatic cancer risk. Further large prospective studies are warranted to report the results stratified by the subtypes of MUFA and PUFA and adjust for other potential risk factors to eliminate residual confounding.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus