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A Pilot Study on Single-dose Toxicity Testing of Hominis placenta Pharmacopuncture in Sprague-Dawley Rats.

Lee YH, Yoon HM, Jang KJ, Kim CH - J Pharmacopuncture (2015)

Bottom Line: Also, no significant changes in body weights were observed among the groups, and no significant differences in hematology/biochemistry, necropsy, and histopathology results were noted.Therefore, this study showed that Hominis placenta pharmacopuncture had no effect on the injected parts in terms of clinical signs, body weight, hematology, clinical chemistry, and necropsy.Therefore, the above findings suggest that treatment with Hominis placenta pharmacopuncture is relatively safe.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Acupuncture & Moxibustion Meridian & Acupoint, College of Oriental Medicine, Dong-Eui University, Busan, Korea.

ABSTRACT

Objectives: This study was performed to analyze the toxicity and to find the lethal dose of the test substance Hominis placenta pharmacopuncture when used as a single-dose in 6 week old, male and female Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats.

Methods: All experiments were conducted at Biotoxtech (Chungwon, Korea), an institution authorized to perform non clinical studies, under the regulations of Good Laboratory Practice (GLP). SD rats were chosen for the pilot study. Doses of Hominis placenta pharmacopuncture extracts, 0.125, 0.25 and 0.5 mL, were administered to the experimental group, and 0.5 mL doses of normal saline solution were administered to the control group. This study was conducted under the approval of the Institutional Animal Ethics Committee.

Results: No deaths or abnormalities occurred in any of the groups. Also, no significant changes in body weights were observed among the groups, and no significant differences in hematology/biochemistry, necropsy, and histopathology results were noted. Hematologically, some changes in the male rats in two experimental groups were observed, but those changes had no clinical or toxicological meaning because they were not dose dependent. Histopathological tests on the injected parts showed cell infiltration in the male rats in one of the experimental groups; however, that result was due to spontaneous generation and had no toxicological meaning. Therefore, this study showed that Hominis placenta pharmacopuncture had no effect on the injected parts in terms of clinical signs, body weight, hematology, clinical chemistry, and necropsy.

Conclusion: As a result of single-dose tests of the test substance Hominis placenta pharmacopuncture in 4 groups of rats, the lethal dose for both males and females exceeded 0.5 mL/animal. Therefore, the above findings suggest that treatment with Hominis placenta pharmacopuncture is relatively safe. Further studies on this subject are needed.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Body weights in male Sprague-Dawley rats.
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Figure 001: Body weights in male Sprague-Dawley rats.

Mentions: No significant changes in body weight were observed in any of the groups (Table 5, Figs. 1,2). No significant changes in the hematological test results were observed in any of the groups, except that the blood urea nitrogen (BUN) of G2 males and the total cholesterol (T-Chol) of G3 males showed statistically significant changes; however, those results had no toxicological meaning because they were not dose dependent (Table 6). No significant changes in the biochemical test results were observed in any of the groups (Table 7), and no abnormalities were noted when visual inspections of all the animals were conducted. No significant changes were noted in the local tolerance test on the injection sites, except for G3 males; however, that result was due to spontaneous generation and had no toxicological meaning because it was not dose dependent.


A Pilot Study on Single-dose Toxicity Testing of Hominis placenta Pharmacopuncture in Sprague-Dawley Rats.

Lee YH, Yoon HM, Jang KJ, Kim CH - J Pharmacopuncture (2015)

Body weights in male Sprague-Dawley rats.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4481399&req=5

Figure 001: Body weights in male Sprague-Dawley rats.
Mentions: No significant changes in body weight were observed in any of the groups (Table 5, Figs. 1,2). No significant changes in the hematological test results were observed in any of the groups, except that the blood urea nitrogen (BUN) of G2 males and the total cholesterol (T-Chol) of G3 males showed statistically significant changes; however, those results had no toxicological meaning because they were not dose dependent (Table 6). No significant changes in the biochemical test results were observed in any of the groups (Table 7), and no abnormalities were noted when visual inspections of all the animals were conducted. No significant changes were noted in the local tolerance test on the injection sites, except for G3 males; however, that result was due to spontaneous generation and had no toxicological meaning because it was not dose dependent.

Bottom Line: Also, no significant changes in body weights were observed among the groups, and no significant differences in hematology/biochemistry, necropsy, and histopathology results were noted.Therefore, this study showed that Hominis placenta pharmacopuncture had no effect on the injected parts in terms of clinical signs, body weight, hematology, clinical chemistry, and necropsy.Therefore, the above findings suggest that treatment with Hominis placenta pharmacopuncture is relatively safe.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Acupuncture & Moxibustion Meridian & Acupoint, College of Oriental Medicine, Dong-Eui University, Busan, Korea.

ABSTRACT

Objectives: This study was performed to analyze the toxicity and to find the lethal dose of the test substance Hominis placenta pharmacopuncture when used as a single-dose in 6 week old, male and female Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats.

Methods: All experiments were conducted at Biotoxtech (Chungwon, Korea), an institution authorized to perform non clinical studies, under the regulations of Good Laboratory Practice (GLP). SD rats were chosen for the pilot study. Doses of Hominis placenta pharmacopuncture extracts, 0.125, 0.25 and 0.5 mL, were administered to the experimental group, and 0.5 mL doses of normal saline solution were administered to the control group. This study was conducted under the approval of the Institutional Animal Ethics Committee.

Results: No deaths or abnormalities occurred in any of the groups. Also, no significant changes in body weights were observed among the groups, and no significant differences in hematology/biochemistry, necropsy, and histopathology results were noted. Hematologically, some changes in the male rats in two experimental groups were observed, but those changes had no clinical or toxicological meaning because they were not dose dependent. Histopathological tests on the injected parts showed cell infiltration in the male rats in one of the experimental groups; however, that result was due to spontaneous generation and had no toxicological meaning. Therefore, this study showed that Hominis placenta pharmacopuncture had no effect on the injected parts in terms of clinical signs, body weight, hematology, clinical chemistry, and necropsy.

Conclusion: As a result of single-dose tests of the test substance Hominis placenta pharmacopuncture in 4 groups of rats, the lethal dose for both males and females exceeded 0.5 mL/animal. Therefore, the above findings suggest that treatment with Hominis placenta pharmacopuncture is relatively safe. Further studies on this subject are needed.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus