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Relationship between the decomposition process of coarse woody debris and fungal community structure as detected by high-throughput sequencing in a deciduous broad-leaved forest in Japan.

Yamashita S, Masuya H, Abe S, Masaki T, Okabe K - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: A structural equation model for each wood genus was used to assess the effect of fungal community structure traits on the decomposition rate and how the fungal community structure was determined by the traits of coarse woody debris.Because fungal community structure is affected partly by the decay stage and wood density of its substrate, these factors influence each other.Further research on interactive effects is needed to improve our understanding of the relationship between fungal community structure and the woody debris decomposition process.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Forestry and Forest Products Research Institute, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, Japan.

ABSTRACT
We examined the relationship between the community structure of wood-decaying fungi, detected by high-throughput sequencing, and the decomposition rate using 13 years of data from a forest dynamics plot. For molecular analysis and wood density measurements, drill dust samples were collected from logs and stumps of Fagus and Quercus in the plot. Regression using a negative exponential model between wood density and time since death revealed that the decomposition rate of Fagus was greater than that of Quercus. The residual between the expected value obtained from the regression curve and the observed wood density was used as a decomposition rate index. Principal component analysis showed that the fungal community compositions of both Fagus and Quercus changed with time since death. Principal component analysis axis scores were used as an index of fungal community composition. A structural equation model for each wood genus was used to assess the effect of fungal community structure traits on the decomposition rate and how the fungal community structure was determined by the traits of coarse woody debris. Results of the structural equation model suggested that the decomposition rate of Fagus was affected by two fungal community composition components: one that was affected by time since death and another that was not affected by the traits of coarse woody debris. In contrast, the decomposition rate of Quercus was not affected by coarse woody debris traits or fungal community structure. These findings suggest that, in the case of Fagus coarse woody debris, the fungal community structure is related to the decomposition process of its host substrate. Because fungal community structure is affected partly by the decay stage and wood density of its substrate, these factors influence each other. Further research on interactive effects is needed to improve our understanding of the relationship between fungal community structure and the woody debris decomposition process.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

SEM analysis results of the decomposition rate index of Fagus CWD.Numbers beside the arrows represent path coefficients. All paths included in the analysis are presented. Straight single-headed arrows represent causal pathways. Curved, double-headed arrows indicate covarying variables. Thick, straight, black arrows indicate significant causal pathways at the level of p < 0.05. Thick, gray, curved arrows indicate significant covarying relationships at the level of p < 0.05. Dashed, straight, curved arrows indicate non-significance (p > 0.05).
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pone.0131510.g005: SEM analysis results of the decomposition rate index of Fagus CWD.Numbers beside the arrows represent path coefficients. All paths included in the analysis are presented. Straight single-headed arrows represent causal pathways. Curved, double-headed arrows indicate covarying variables. Thick, straight, black arrows indicate significant causal pathways at the level of p < 0.05. Thick, gray, curved arrows indicate significant covarying relationships at the level of p < 0.05. Dashed, straight, curved arrows indicate non-significance (p > 0.05).

Mentions: SEM for the decomposition process of Fagus CWD showed a nearly good fit: the p-value by chi-squared test was 0.113, CFI was 0.929, RMSEA was 0.117, and SRMSR was 0.064. In the SEM for Fagus (Fig 5), the strongest predictor of the decomposition rate index was the PCA scores of the second axis, with a standardized partial regression coefficient of 0.377 (p = 0.014). The standardized partial regression coefficient of PCA scores of the third axis and the decomposition rate index were 0.354 (p = 0.009). Time since death significantly affected the PCA scores of the third axis (standard coefficient = 0.410, p = 0.010). The number of OTUs varied with evenness and with the PCA scores of the first and second axes. Evenness varied with the PCA scores of the first axis.


Relationship between the decomposition process of coarse woody debris and fungal community structure as detected by high-throughput sequencing in a deciduous broad-leaved forest in Japan.

Yamashita S, Masuya H, Abe S, Masaki T, Okabe K - PLoS ONE (2015)

SEM analysis results of the decomposition rate index of Fagus CWD.Numbers beside the arrows represent path coefficients. All paths included in the analysis are presented. Straight single-headed arrows represent causal pathways. Curved, double-headed arrows indicate covarying variables. Thick, straight, black arrows indicate significant causal pathways at the level of p < 0.05. Thick, gray, curved arrows indicate significant covarying relationships at the level of p < 0.05. Dashed, straight, curved arrows indicate non-significance (p > 0.05).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4481346&req=5

pone.0131510.g005: SEM analysis results of the decomposition rate index of Fagus CWD.Numbers beside the arrows represent path coefficients. All paths included in the analysis are presented. Straight single-headed arrows represent causal pathways. Curved, double-headed arrows indicate covarying variables. Thick, straight, black arrows indicate significant causal pathways at the level of p < 0.05. Thick, gray, curved arrows indicate significant covarying relationships at the level of p < 0.05. Dashed, straight, curved arrows indicate non-significance (p > 0.05).
Mentions: SEM for the decomposition process of Fagus CWD showed a nearly good fit: the p-value by chi-squared test was 0.113, CFI was 0.929, RMSEA was 0.117, and SRMSR was 0.064. In the SEM for Fagus (Fig 5), the strongest predictor of the decomposition rate index was the PCA scores of the second axis, with a standardized partial regression coefficient of 0.377 (p = 0.014). The standardized partial regression coefficient of PCA scores of the third axis and the decomposition rate index were 0.354 (p = 0.009). Time since death significantly affected the PCA scores of the third axis (standard coefficient = 0.410, p = 0.010). The number of OTUs varied with evenness and with the PCA scores of the first and second axes. Evenness varied with the PCA scores of the first axis.

Bottom Line: A structural equation model for each wood genus was used to assess the effect of fungal community structure traits on the decomposition rate and how the fungal community structure was determined by the traits of coarse woody debris.Because fungal community structure is affected partly by the decay stage and wood density of its substrate, these factors influence each other.Further research on interactive effects is needed to improve our understanding of the relationship between fungal community structure and the woody debris decomposition process.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Forestry and Forest Products Research Institute, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, Japan.

ABSTRACT
We examined the relationship between the community structure of wood-decaying fungi, detected by high-throughput sequencing, and the decomposition rate using 13 years of data from a forest dynamics plot. For molecular analysis and wood density measurements, drill dust samples were collected from logs and stumps of Fagus and Quercus in the plot. Regression using a negative exponential model between wood density and time since death revealed that the decomposition rate of Fagus was greater than that of Quercus. The residual between the expected value obtained from the regression curve and the observed wood density was used as a decomposition rate index. Principal component analysis showed that the fungal community compositions of both Fagus and Quercus changed with time since death. Principal component analysis axis scores were used as an index of fungal community composition. A structural equation model for each wood genus was used to assess the effect of fungal community structure traits on the decomposition rate and how the fungal community structure was determined by the traits of coarse woody debris. Results of the structural equation model suggested that the decomposition rate of Fagus was affected by two fungal community composition components: one that was affected by time since death and another that was not affected by the traits of coarse woody debris. In contrast, the decomposition rate of Quercus was not affected by coarse woody debris traits or fungal community structure. These findings suggest that, in the case of Fagus coarse woody debris, the fungal community structure is related to the decomposition process of its host substrate. Because fungal community structure is affected partly by the decay stage and wood density of its substrate, these factors influence each other. Further research on interactive effects is needed to improve our understanding of the relationship between fungal community structure and the woody debris decomposition process.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus