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Dendritic planarity of Purkinje cells is independent of Reelin signaling.

Kim J, Park TJ, Kwon N, Lee D, Kim S, Kohmura Y, Ishikawa T, Kim KT, Curran T, Je JH - Brain Struct Funct (2014)

Bottom Line: Purkinje cells that failed to migrate completely exhibited conical dendrites with abnormal 3-D arborization and reduced dendritic complexity.In contrast, Purkinje cells that migrated successfully displayed planar dendritic and spine morphologies similar to normal cells, despite reduced dendritic complexity.While Reelin signaling is important for the migration process, it does not make a direct major contribution to dendrite formation.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: X-ray Imaging Center, School of Interdisciplinary Bioscience and Bioengineering, Pohang University of Science and Technology (POSTECH), Pohang, 790-784, South Korea.

ABSTRACT
The dendritic planarity of Purkinje cells is critical for cerebellar circuit formation. In the absence of Crk and CrkL, the Reelin pathway does not function resulting in partial Purkinje cell migration and defective dendritogenesis. However, the relationships among Purkinje cell migration, dendritic development and Reelin signaling have not been clearly delineated. Here, we use synchrotron X-ray microscopy to obtain 3-D images of Golgi-stained Purkinje cell dendrites. Purkinje cells that failed to migrate completely exhibited conical dendrites with abnormal 3-D arborization and reduced dendritic complexity. Furthermore, their spines were fewer in number with a distorted morphology. In contrast, Purkinje cells that migrated successfully displayed planar dendritic and spine morphologies similar to normal cells, despite reduced dendritic complexity. These results indicate that, during cerebellar formation, Purkinje cells migrate into an environment that supports development of dendritic planarity and spine formation. While Reelin signaling is important for the migration process, it does not make a direct major contribution to dendrite formation.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Nano-radiographic images of PC spines and quantitative analysis of their densities. a–c Entire PC nano-images of a normal, a migrated and a non-migrated Crk/CrkL knockout PC. d–f Magnified images of the box regions in panels a–c, respectively. g Spine numbers per 10 μm of dendrites. Ten mice were analyzed for each group. The error bars correspond to the SEM. NS not significant; ***p < 0.001 compared to normal
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Fig5: Nano-radiographic images of PC spines and quantitative analysis of their densities. a–c Entire PC nano-images of a normal, a migrated and a non-migrated Crk/CrkL knockout PC. d–f Magnified images of the box regions in panels a–c, respectively. g Spine numbers per 10 μm of dendrites. Ten mice were analyzed for each group. The error bars correspond to the SEM. NS not significant; ***p < 0.001 compared to normal

Mentions: Dendritic spines play important roles in neural information processing and plasticity. The morphology and density of spines have received much attention because of their relationship to their role in synaptic plasticity in the central nervous system (Yuste and Bonhoeffer 2004; Rochefort and Konnerth 2012; Lee et al. 2005). To examine the spines of normal and Crk/CrkL mutant PC, we performed nano-radiography (Fig. 5a–c). High resolution (30 nm) and excellent contrast revealed details of spine morphology, as shown in Fig. 5d–f (Chen et al. 2008; Wu et al. 2012). We found that spine morphology was similar in normal (Fig. 5d; box in Fig. 5a) and migrated mutant (Fig. 5e; box in Fig. 5b) PC, but it was substantially distorted in non-migrated mutant PC (Fig. 5f; box in Fig. 5c). More specifically, whereas spines in normal and migrated mutant PC separately sprout from dendrites (yellow asterisks in Fig. 5d, e), spines in non-migrated mutant PC clustered with each other (Fig. 5f). In addition, while the spine density per 10 μm of dendrite was comparable in migrated mutant PC (25.8 ± 0.7) and normal PC (25 ± 0.7), it was significantly decreased (15 ± 0.7) in non-migrated PC (Fig. 5g). The distorted morphology and low density of spines in non-migrated PC may contribute to the reduced functionality of Crk/CrkL knockout cerebellum. We propose that migration to the PC plate is essential for the synaptic development and maturation of PC and that the environment in the PC plate contributes to spinogenesis as well as dendritogenesis.Fig. 5


Dendritic planarity of Purkinje cells is independent of Reelin signaling.

Kim J, Park TJ, Kwon N, Lee D, Kim S, Kohmura Y, Ishikawa T, Kim KT, Curran T, Je JH - Brain Struct Funct (2014)

Nano-radiographic images of PC spines and quantitative analysis of their densities. a–c Entire PC nano-images of a normal, a migrated and a non-migrated Crk/CrkL knockout PC. d–f Magnified images of the box regions in panels a–c, respectively. g Spine numbers per 10 μm of dendrites. Ten mice were analyzed for each group. The error bars correspond to the SEM. NS not significant; ***p < 0.001 compared to normal
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Related In: Results  -  Collection

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Fig5: Nano-radiographic images of PC spines and quantitative analysis of their densities. a–c Entire PC nano-images of a normal, a migrated and a non-migrated Crk/CrkL knockout PC. d–f Magnified images of the box regions in panels a–c, respectively. g Spine numbers per 10 μm of dendrites. Ten mice were analyzed for each group. The error bars correspond to the SEM. NS not significant; ***p < 0.001 compared to normal
Mentions: Dendritic spines play important roles in neural information processing and plasticity. The morphology and density of spines have received much attention because of their relationship to their role in synaptic plasticity in the central nervous system (Yuste and Bonhoeffer 2004; Rochefort and Konnerth 2012; Lee et al. 2005). To examine the spines of normal and Crk/CrkL mutant PC, we performed nano-radiography (Fig. 5a–c). High resolution (30 nm) and excellent contrast revealed details of spine morphology, as shown in Fig. 5d–f (Chen et al. 2008; Wu et al. 2012). We found that spine morphology was similar in normal (Fig. 5d; box in Fig. 5a) and migrated mutant (Fig. 5e; box in Fig. 5b) PC, but it was substantially distorted in non-migrated mutant PC (Fig. 5f; box in Fig. 5c). More specifically, whereas spines in normal and migrated mutant PC separately sprout from dendrites (yellow asterisks in Fig. 5d, e), spines in non-migrated mutant PC clustered with each other (Fig. 5f). In addition, while the spine density per 10 μm of dendrite was comparable in migrated mutant PC (25.8 ± 0.7) and normal PC (25 ± 0.7), it was significantly decreased (15 ± 0.7) in non-migrated PC (Fig. 5g). The distorted morphology and low density of spines in non-migrated PC may contribute to the reduced functionality of Crk/CrkL knockout cerebellum. We propose that migration to the PC plate is essential for the synaptic development and maturation of PC and that the environment in the PC plate contributes to spinogenesis as well as dendritogenesis.Fig. 5

Bottom Line: Purkinje cells that failed to migrate completely exhibited conical dendrites with abnormal 3-D arborization and reduced dendritic complexity.In contrast, Purkinje cells that migrated successfully displayed planar dendritic and spine morphologies similar to normal cells, despite reduced dendritic complexity.While Reelin signaling is important for the migration process, it does not make a direct major contribution to dendrite formation.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: X-ray Imaging Center, School of Interdisciplinary Bioscience and Bioengineering, Pohang University of Science and Technology (POSTECH), Pohang, 790-784, South Korea.

ABSTRACT
The dendritic planarity of Purkinje cells is critical for cerebellar circuit formation. In the absence of Crk and CrkL, the Reelin pathway does not function resulting in partial Purkinje cell migration and defective dendritogenesis. However, the relationships among Purkinje cell migration, dendritic development and Reelin signaling have not been clearly delineated. Here, we use synchrotron X-ray microscopy to obtain 3-D images of Golgi-stained Purkinje cell dendrites. Purkinje cells that failed to migrate completely exhibited conical dendrites with abnormal 3-D arborization and reduced dendritic complexity. Furthermore, their spines were fewer in number with a distorted morphology. In contrast, Purkinje cells that migrated successfully displayed planar dendritic and spine morphologies similar to normal cells, despite reduced dendritic complexity. These results indicate that, during cerebellar formation, Purkinje cells migrate into an environment that supports development of dendritic planarity and spine formation. While Reelin signaling is important for the migration process, it does not make a direct major contribution to dendrite formation.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus