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Dendritic planarity of Purkinje cells is independent of Reelin signaling.

Kim J, Park TJ, Kwon N, Lee D, Kim S, Kohmura Y, Ishikawa T, Kim KT, Curran T, Je JH - Brain Struct Funct (2014)

Bottom Line: Purkinje cells that failed to migrate completely exhibited conical dendrites with abnormal 3-D arborization and reduced dendritic complexity.In contrast, Purkinje cells that migrated successfully displayed planar dendritic and spine morphologies similar to normal cells, despite reduced dendritic complexity.While Reelin signaling is important for the migration process, it does not make a direct major contribution to dendrite formation.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: X-ray Imaging Center, School of Interdisciplinary Bioscience and Bioengineering, Pohang University of Science and Technology (POSTECH), Pohang, 790-784, South Korea.

ABSTRACT
The dendritic planarity of Purkinje cells is critical for cerebellar circuit formation. In the absence of Crk and CrkL, the Reelin pathway does not function resulting in partial Purkinje cell migration and defective dendritogenesis. However, the relationships among Purkinje cell migration, dendritic development and Reelin signaling have not been clearly delineated. Here, we use synchrotron X-ray microscopy to obtain 3-D images of Golgi-stained Purkinje cell dendrites. Purkinje cells that failed to migrate completely exhibited conical dendrites with abnormal 3-D arborization and reduced dendritic complexity. Furthermore, their spines were fewer in number with a distorted morphology. In contrast, Purkinje cells that migrated successfully displayed planar dendritic and spine morphologies similar to normal cells, despite reduced dendritic complexity. These results indicate that, during cerebellar formation, Purkinje cells migrate into an environment that supports development of dendritic planarity and spine formation. While Reelin signaling is important for the migration process, it does not make a direct major contribution to dendrite formation.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

3-D quantitative analysis of the branching rules and the fractal dimension of PC. a Branch angles. b Branch segment length. c Branch numbers, as determined by 3-D Sholl analysis. d 3-D Fractal dimension. 5 normal, 5 migrated and 10 non-migrated mutant PC were tested. The error bars correspond to the SEM
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Fig4: 3-D quantitative analysis of the branching rules and the fractal dimension of PC. a Branch angles. b Branch segment length. c Branch numbers, as determined by 3-D Sholl analysis. d 3-D Fractal dimension. 5 normal, 5 migrated and 10 non-migrated mutant PC were tested. The error bars correspond to the SEM

Mentions: The main criterion to identify PC among various cell types is the typical soma size (approximately 20 μm) in normal and Crk/CrkL knockout cerebella: the soma sizes of the other cell types in the cerebella are generally much smaller than 10 μm. To obtain 3-D coordinates of the PC dendrites, reconstructed image stacks of PC were segmented and skeletonized using the Amira 5.2 software. The 3-D coordinates of the PC were automatically analyzed with the Matlab software (Mathworks, Natick, MA, USA). For 3-D Sholl analysis (Fig. 4c; Fig. S1c), a series of concentric spheres of 5 μm increments were drawn around the cell body, and the number of branches between consecutive spheres was counted. For spine analysis, we adjusted the image contrast by altering the display range using the Image-Pro Plus software (Media Cybernetics, Silver Springs, MD, USA). This allowed each spine to be identified. Based on this process, the number of spines per dendritic segment was counted and normalized to 10 μm of dendritic length.


Dendritic planarity of Purkinje cells is independent of Reelin signaling.

Kim J, Park TJ, Kwon N, Lee D, Kim S, Kohmura Y, Ishikawa T, Kim KT, Curran T, Je JH - Brain Struct Funct (2014)

3-D quantitative analysis of the branching rules and the fractal dimension of PC. a Branch angles. b Branch segment length. c Branch numbers, as determined by 3-D Sholl analysis. d 3-D Fractal dimension. 5 normal, 5 migrated and 10 non-migrated mutant PC were tested. The error bars correspond to the SEM
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

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getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4481330&req=5

Fig4: 3-D quantitative analysis of the branching rules and the fractal dimension of PC. a Branch angles. b Branch segment length. c Branch numbers, as determined by 3-D Sholl analysis. d 3-D Fractal dimension. 5 normal, 5 migrated and 10 non-migrated mutant PC were tested. The error bars correspond to the SEM
Mentions: The main criterion to identify PC among various cell types is the typical soma size (approximately 20 μm) in normal and Crk/CrkL knockout cerebella: the soma sizes of the other cell types in the cerebella are generally much smaller than 10 μm. To obtain 3-D coordinates of the PC dendrites, reconstructed image stacks of PC were segmented and skeletonized using the Amira 5.2 software. The 3-D coordinates of the PC were automatically analyzed with the Matlab software (Mathworks, Natick, MA, USA). For 3-D Sholl analysis (Fig. 4c; Fig. S1c), a series of concentric spheres of 5 μm increments were drawn around the cell body, and the number of branches between consecutive spheres was counted. For spine analysis, we adjusted the image contrast by altering the display range using the Image-Pro Plus software (Media Cybernetics, Silver Springs, MD, USA). This allowed each spine to be identified. Based on this process, the number of spines per dendritic segment was counted and normalized to 10 μm of dendritic length.

Bottom Line: Purkinje cells that failed to migrate completely exhibited conical dendrites with abnormal 3-D arborization and reduced dendritic complexity.In contrast, Purkinje cells that migrated successfully displayed planar dendritic and spine morphologies similar to normal cells, despite reduced dendritic complexity.While Reelin signaling is important for the migration process, it does not make a direct major contribution to dendrite formation.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: X-ray Imaging Center, School of Interdisciplinary Bioscience and Bioengineering, Pohang University of Science and Technology (POSTECH), Pohang, 790-784, South Korea.

ABSTRACT
The dendritic planarity of Purkinje cells is critical for cerebellar circuit formation. In the absence of Crk and CrkL, the Reelin pathway does not function resulting in partial Purkinje cell migration and defective dendritogenesis. However, the relationships among Purkinje cell migration, dendritic development and Reelin signaling have not been clearly delineated. Here, we use synchrotron X-ray microscopy to obtain 3-D images of Golgi-stained Purkinje cell dendrites. Purkinje cells that failed to migrate completely exhibited conical dendrites with abnormal 3-D arborization and reduced dendritic complexity. Furthermore, their spines were fewer in number with a distorted morphology. In contrast, Purkinje cells that migrated successfully displayed planar dendritic and spine morphologies similar to normal cells, despite reduced dendritic complexity. These results indicate that, during cerebellar formation, Purkinje cells migrate into an environment that supports development of dendritic planarity and spine formation. While Reelin signaling is important for the migration process, it does not make a direct major contribution to dendrite formation.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus