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Dissociable Behavioral, Physiological and Neural Effects of Acute Glucose and Fructose Ingestion: A Pilot Study.

Wölnerhanssen BK, Meyer-Gerspach AC, Schmidt A, Zimak N, Peterli R, Beglinger C, Borgwardt S - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: Glucose ingestion induced significantly greater elevations in plasma glucose, insulin, GLP-1 and GIP, while feelings of fullness increased and prospective food consumption decreased relative to fructose.Our findings suggest that glucose and fructose induce dissociable effects on rsFC within the basal ganglia/limbic network, which are probably mediated by different insulin levels.A larger study would be recommended in order to confirm these findings.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Gastroenterology, University Hospital of Basel, Basel, Switzerland.

ABSTRACT
Previous research has revealed that glucose and fructose ingestion differentially modulate release of satiation hormones. Recent studies have begun to elucidate brain-gut interactions with neuroimaging approaches such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), but the neural mechanism underlying different behavioral and physiological effects of glucose and fructose are unclear. In this paper, we have used resting state functional MRI to explore whether acute glucose and fructose ingestion also induced dissociable effects in the neural system. Using a cross-over, double-blind, placebo-controlled design, we compared resting state functional connectivity (rsFC) strengths within the basal ganglia/limbic network in 12 healthy lean males. Each subject was administered fructose, glucose and placebo on three separate occasions. Subsequent correlation analysis was used to examine relations between rsFC findings and plasma concentrations of satiation hormones and subjective feelings of appetite. Glucose ingestion induced significantly greater elevations in plasma glucose, insulin, GLP-1 and GIP, while feelings of fullness increased and prospective food consumption decreased relative to fructose. Furthermore, glucose increased rsFC of the left caudatus and putamen, precuneus and lingual gyrus more than fructose, whereas within the basal ganglia/limbic network, fructose increased rsFC of the left amygdala, left hippocampus, right parahippocampus, orbitofrontal cortex and precentral gyrus more than glucose. Moreover, compared to fructose, the increased rsFC after glucose positively correlated with the glucose-induced increase in insulin. Our findings suggest that glucose and fructose induce dissociable effects on rsFC within the basal ganglia/limbic network, which are probably mediated by different insulin levels. A larger study would be recommended in order to confirm these findings.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Subjective Appetite Perceptions.Relative to fructose treatments, ingested glucose increased subjective feelings of (A) satiety (n.s.) and (B) fullness (AUC-15 min: p = 0.04) and reduced feelings of (C) hunger (n.s.) and (D) prospective food consumption (AUC-15 min: p = 0.017). Differences seen between placebo and fructose, resp. placebo and glucose were non-significant.
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pone.0130280.g002: Subjective Appetite Perceptions.Relative to fructose treatments, ingested glucose increased subjective feelings of (A) satiety (n.s.) and (B) fullness (AUC-15 min: p = 0.04) and reduced feelings of (C) hunger (n.s.) and (D) prospective food consumption (AUC-15 min: p = 0.017). Differences seen between placebo and fructose, resp. placebo and glucose were non-significant.

Mentions: Relative to fructose and placebo, ingested glucose increased feelings of satiety and fullness and reduced feelings of hunger and prospective food consumption. However, these differences were not all statistically significant: fullness was significantly higher after glucose treatment compared to fructose treatment (AUC 0–15 min: p = 0.04) and prospective food consumption was significantly lower after glucose compared to fructose treatment (AUC 0–15 min: p = 0.017). Although feelings of satiety were higher and feelings of hunger were lower after glucose treatment compared to fructose treatment statistical significance was not reached. Interestingly, values after placebo treatment lie in between fructose and glucose. However, differences seen between placebo and fructose, resp. placebo and glucose were non-significant (Fig 2).


Dissociable Behavioral, Physiological and Neural Effects of Acute Glucose and Fructose Ingestion: A Pilot Study.

Wölnerhanssen BK, Meyer-Gerspach AC, Schmidt A, Zimak N, Peterli R, Beglinger C, Borgwardt S - PLoS ONE (2015)

Subjective Appetite Perceptions.Relative to fructose treatments, ingested glucose increased subjective feelings of (A) satiety (n.s.) and (B) fullness (AUC-15 min: p = 0.04) and reduced feelings of (C) hunger (n.s.) and (D) prospective food consumption (AUC-15 min: p = 0.017). Differences seen between placebo and fructose, resp. placebo and glucose were non-significant.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4481317&req=5

pone.0130280.g002: Subjective Appetite Perceptions.Relative to fructose treatments, ingested glucose increased subjective feelings of (A) satiety (n.s.) and (B) fullness (AUC-15 min: p = 0.04) and reduced feelings of (C) hunger (n.s.) and (D) prospective food consumption (AUC-15 min: p = 0.017). Differences seen between placebo and fructose, resp. placebo and glucose were non-significant.
Mentions: Relative to fructose and placebo, ingested glucose increased feelings of satiety and fullness and reduced feelings of hunger and prospective food consumption. However, these differences were not all statistically significant: fullness was significantly higher after glucose treatment compared to fructose treatment (AUC 0–15 min: p = 0.04) and prospective food consumption was significantly lower after glucose compared to fructose treatment (AUC 0–15 min: p = 0.017). Although feelings of satiety were higher and feelings of hunger were lower after glucose treatment compared to fructose treatment statistical significance was not reached. Interestingly, values after placebo treatment lie in between fructose and glucose. However, differences seen between placebo and fructose, resp. placebo and glucose were non-significant (Fig 2).

Bottom Line: Glucose ingestion induced significantly greater elevations in plasma glucose, insulin, GLP-1 and GIP, while feelings of fullness increased and prospective food consumption decreased relative to fructose.Our findings suggest that glucose and fructose induce dissociable effects on rsFC within the basal ganglia/limbic network, which are probably mediated by different insulin levels.A larger study would be recommended in order to confirm these findings.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Gastroenterology, University Hospital of Basel, Basel, Switzerland.

ABSTRACT
Previous research has revealed that glucose and fructose ingestion differentially modulate release of satiation hormones. Recent studies have begun to elucidate brain-gut interactions with neuroimaging approaches such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), but the neural mechanism underlying different behavioral and physiological effects of glucose and fructose are unclear. In this paper, we have used resting state functional MRI to explore whether acute glucose and fructose ingestion also induced dissociable effects in the neural system. Using a cross-over, double-blind, placebo-controlled design, we compared resting state functional connectivity (rsFC) strengths within the basal ganglia/limbic network in 12 healthy lean males. Each subject was administered fructose, glucose and placebo on three separate occasions. Subsequent correlation analysis was used to examine relations between rsFC findings and plasma concentrations of satiation hormones and subjective feelings of appetite. Glucose ingestion induced significantly greater elevations in plasma glucose, insulin, GLP-1 and GIP, while feelings of fullness increased and prospective food consumption decreased relative to fructose. Furthermore, glucose increased rsFC of the left caudatus and putamen, precuneus and lingual gyrus more than fructose, whereas within the basal ganglia/limbic network, fructose increased rsFC of the left amygdala, left hippocampus, right parahippocampus, orbitofrontal cortex and precentral gyrus more than glucose. Moreover, compared to fructose, the increased rsFC after glucose positively correlated with the glucose-induced increase in insulin. Our findings suggest that glucose and fructose induce dissociable effects on rsFC within the basal ganglia/limbic network, which are probably mediated by different insulin levels. A larger study would be recommended in order to confirm these findings.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus