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Computational Biology: Moving into the Future One Click at a Time.

Fogg CN, Kovats DE - PLoS Comput. Biol. (2015)

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Freelance Science Writer, Kensington, Maryland, United States of America.

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In honor of the tenth anniversary of PLOS Computational Biology, Phil Bourne, Win Hide, Janet Kelso, Scott Markel, Ruth Nussinov, and Janet Thornton shared their memories of the heady beginnings of computational biology and their thoughts on the field’s promising and provocative future... In 2014, Bourne accepted the newly created position of associate director for data science (ADDS) at the National Institutes of Health (NIH), and he has been tasked with leading an NIH-wide initiative to better utilize the vast and growing collections of biomedical data in more effective and innovative ways... Bourne has been deeply involved with the International Society for Computational Biology (ISCB) throughout his career and is the founding editor-in-chief (EIC) of PLOS Computational Biology, an official journal of ISCB... He has been a firm believer in open access to scientific literature and the effective dissemination of data and results, for which PLOS Computational Biology is an exemplary model... Win Hide (Fig 2) has witnessed the transformation of biological research firsthand, from his early wet-lab training in molecular genetics to his present-day research using computational approaches to understand neurodegenerative diseases... Hide graduated from Temple University with a PhD in molecular genetics, and after his postdoctoral training and time spent in Silicon Valley, he founded the South African National Bioinformatics Institute in 1996... Writing a script is not software programming... To write scripts, you do not need to take courses in computer science or computer engineering... As personal genomics becomes a reality, Kelso thinks computational biologists will have to consider that the public will want access to their tools and resources. “The computational biologist’s role is to provide good resources and tools that allow both biomedical researchers and ordinary people to understand and interpret their genome sequence data... That is the ideal scenario. ” Janet Thornton (Fig 6) has spent her research career studying protein structure and is considered a leading researcher in the field of structural bioinformatics... Thornton’s early research career at Oxford included using protein sequences to predict structure, and this type of research marked the earliest beginnings of bioinformatics... Thornton’s research has changed over time as bioinformatics tools and algorithms improved and protein data flooded the databases... Aspects of computational biology are integrating into all levels of medicine and health care... Medical professionals as well as the public need to be well informed and educated about these changes in order to realize the full potential of this new frontier in medicine without fear of the technological advances.

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Ruth Nussinov.Senior investigator and head of computational structural biology group, Laboratory of Experimental Immunology, Cancer and Inflammation Program, NCI, NIH, and professor in the School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University.
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pcbi.1004323.g005: Ruth Nussinov.Senior investigator and head of computational structural biology group, Laboratory of Experimental Immunology, Cancer and Inflammation Program, NCI, NIH, and professor in the School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University.

Mentions: Ruth Nussinov (Fig 5) heads the computational structural biology group in the Laboratory of Experimental Immunology at the National Cancer Institute (NCI)/NIH and is editor-in-chief of PLOS Computational Biology. She earned a PhD in biochemistry from Rutgers University and did her postdoctoral training at the Weizmann Institute. She has spent her career working as a computational biologist and is a pioneer of DNA sequence analysis and RNA structure prediction. Nussinov began her training at a time when the term “computational biology” was poorly understood by biologists and mathematicians and no formal training programs that combined computer science, mathematics, and biology existed. In 1985, Nussinov accepted a position as an associate professor at the Tel Aviv University Medical School, where she began an independent research program. She recalled a conversation with a dean at the school. He said, “Ruth, what are you? A mathematician?” To his chagrin and befuddlement, she replied, “No, I’m a biologist, a computational biologist.” Now computational biology is one of the hottest and fastest growing fields in biology, and training programs are in high demand.


Computational Biology: Moving into the Future One Click at a Time.

Fogg CN, Kovats DE - PLoS Comput. Biol. (2015)

Ruth Nussinov.Senior investigator and head of computational structural biology group, Laboratory of Experimental Immunology, Cancer and Inflammation Program, NCI, NIH, and professor in the School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4481313&req=5

pcbi.1004323.g005: Ruth Nussinov.Senior investigator and head of computational structural biology group, Laboratory of Experimental Immunology, Cancer and Inflammation Program, NCI, NIH, and professor in the School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University.
Mentions: Ruth Nussinov (Fig 5) heads the computational structural biology group in the Laboratory of Experimental Immunology at the National Cancer Institute (NCI)/NIH and is editor-in-chief of PLOS Computational Biology. She earned a PhD in biochemistry from Rutgers University and did her postdoctoral training at the Weizmann Institute. She has spent her career working as a computational biologist and is a pioneer of DNA sequence analysis and RNA structure prediction. Nussinov began her training at a time when the term “computational biology” was poorly understood by biologists and mathematicians and no formal training programs that combined computer science, mathematics, and biology existed. In 1985, Nussinov accepted a position as an associate professor at the Tel Aviv University Medical School, where she began an independent research program. She recalled a conversation with a dean at the school. He said, “Ruth, what are you? A mathematician?” To his chagrin and befuddlement, she replied, “No, I’m a biologist, a computational biologist.” Now computational biology is one of the hottest and fastest growing fields in biology, and training programs are in high demand.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Freelance Science Writer, Kensington, Maryland, United States of America.

AUTOMATICALLY GENERATED EXCERPT
Please rate it.

In honor of the tenth anniversary of PLOS Computational Biology, Phil Bourne, Win Hide, Janet Kelso, Scott Markel, Ruth Nussinov, and Janet Thornton shared their memories of the heady beginnings of computational biology and their thoughts on the field’s promising and provocative future... In 2014, Bourne accepted the newly created position of associate director for data science (ADDS) at the National Institutes of Health (NIH), and he has been tasked with leading an NIH-wide initiative to better utilize the vast and growing collections of biomedical data in more effective and innovative ways... Bourne has been deeply involved with the International Society for Computational Biology (ISCB) throughout his career and is the founding editor-in-chief (EIC) of PLOS Computational Biology, an official journal of ISCB... He has been a firm believer in open access to scientific literature and the effective dissemination of data and results, for which PLOS Computational Biology is an exemplary model... Win Hide (Fig 2) has witnessed the transformation of biological research firsthand, from his early wet-lab training in molecular genetics to his present-day research using computational approaches to understand neurodegenerative diseases... Hide graduated from Temple University with a PhD in molecular genetics, and after his postdoctoral training and time spent in Silicon Valley, he founded the South African National Bioinformatics Institute in 1996... Writing a script is not software programming... To write scripts, you do not need to take courses in computer science or computer engineering... As personal genomics becomes a reality, Kelso thinks computational biologists will have to consider that the public will want access to their tools and resources. “The computational biologist’s role is to provide good resources and tools that allow both biomedical researchers and ordinary people to understand and interpret their genome sequence data... That is the ideal scenario. ” Janet Thornton (Fig 6) has spent her research career studying protein structure and is considered a leading researcher in the field of structural bioinformatics... Thornton’s early research career at Oxford included using protein sequences to predict structure, and this type of research marked the earliest beginnings of bioinformatics... Thornton’s research has changed over time as bioinformatics tools and algorithms improved and protein data flooded the databases... Aspects of computational biology are integrating into all levels of medicine and health care... Medical professionals as well as the public need to be well informed and educated about these changes in order to realize the full potential of this new frontier in medicine without fear of the technological advances.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus