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Validation of an automated mite counter for Dermanyssus gallinae in experimental laying hen cages.

Mul MF, van Riel JW, Meerburg BG, Dicke M, George DR, Groot Koerkamp PW - Exp. Appl. Acarol. (2015)

Bottom Line: This validation study resulted in 17 data points of 'number of mites counted' by the automated mite counter and the 'number of mites present' in the experimental laying hen cages.The study demonstrated that the automated mite counter was able to track the D. gallinae population effectively.A wider evaluation showed that this automated mite counter can become a useful tool in IPM of D. gallinae in laying hen facilities.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Wageningen UR Livestock Research, P.O. Box 338, 6700 AH, Wageningen, The Netherlands, monique.mul@wur.nl.

ABSTRACT
For integrated pest management (IPM) programs to be maximally effective, monitoring of the growth and decline of the pest populations is essential. Here, we present the validation results of a new automated monitoring device for the poultry red mite (Dermanyssus gallinae), a serious pest in laying hen facilities world-wide. This monitoring device (called an "automated mite counter") was validated in experimental laying hen cages with live birds and a growing population of D. gallinae. This validation study resulted in 17 data points of 'number of mites counted' by the automated mite counter and the 'number of mites present' in the experimental laying hen cages. The study demonstrated that the automated mite counter was able to track the D. gallinae population effectively. A wider evaluation showed that this automated mite counter can become a useful tool in IPM of D. gallinae in laying hen facilities.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Schematic cross-sectional view of the automated mite counter, including an opening (diameter approximately 1–1.5 mm) to the tube (0) in a body (1), comprising a casing and a lid closing the casing, a receiving section, (2) a sensor device for counting the passing mites (3), an electronic processor (4), a tube (5), filter (6), a removal device using air suction (7) and a power and data cable (8)
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Fig2: Schematic cross-sectional view of the automated mite counter, including an opening (diameter approximately 1–1.5 mm) to the tube (0) in a body (1), comprising a casing and a lid closing the casing, a receiving section, (2) a sensor device for counting the passing mites (3), an electronic processor (4), a tube (5), filter (6), a removal device using air suction (7) and a power and data cable (8)

Mentions: Within each cage, an automated mite counter (Fig. 2) was fixed to the perch using cable ties and tape. The entrance of the counter (0) was positioned in the lid of the case next to the bottom of the round metal perch (Fig. 1). Mites entering the counter through a hole (diameter of 1–1.5 mm) in the lid (1) were detected by a sensor device (3) when passing the sensor. When a mite was detected, the sensor device passed a signal to the processor (4), which subsequently switched on the insect removal device (7) to remove the mites in front of the sensor, by air suction, into a filter (6). This filter contained the mites until it was emptied outside the cage, at weekly intervals, to prevent blockage of the air flow. We assumed it very unlikely that the mites were able to escape from the filter as this would have required overcoming a series of physical obstacles. This was confirmed by the fact that no mites were counted during light periods. We assumed that, since it was dark on the inside of the counter, mites would have been willing to move within the counter at any time of the day.Fig. 2


Validation of an automated mite counter for Dermanyssus gallinae in experimental laying hen cages.

Mul MF, van Riel JW, Meerburg BG, Dicke M, George DR, Groot Koerkamp PW - Exp. Appl. Acarol. (2015)

Schematic cross-sectional view of the automated mite counter, including an opening (diameter approximately 1–1.5 mm) to the tube (0) in a body (1), comprising a casing and a lid closing the casing, a receiving section, (2) a sensor device for counting the passing mites (3), an electronic processor (4), a tube (5), filter (6), a removal device using air suction (7) and a power and data cable (8)
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4481303&req=5

Fig2: Schematic cross-sectional view of the automated mite counter, including an opening (diameter approximately 1–1.5 mm) to the tube (0) in a body (1), comprising a casing and a lid closing the casing, a receiving section, (2) a sensor device for counting the passing mites (3), an electronic processor (4), a tube (5), filter (6), a removal device using air suction (7) and a power and data cable (8)
Mentions: Within each cage, an automated mite counter (Fig. 2) was fixed to the perch using cable ties and tape. The entrance of the counter (0) was positioned in the lid of the case next to the bottom of the round metal perch (Fig. 1). Mites entering the counter through a hole (diameter of 1–1.5 mm) in the lid (1) were detected by a sensor device (3) when passing the sensor. When a mite was detected, the sensor device passed a signal to the processor (4), which subsequently switched on the insect removal device (7) to remove the mites in front of the sensor, by air suction, into a filter (6). This filter contained the mites until it was emptied outside the cage, at weekly intervals, to prevent blockage of the air flow. We assumed it very unlikely that the mites were able to escape from the filter as this would have required overcoming a series of physical obstacles. This was confirmed by the fact that no mites were counted during light periods. We assumed that, since it was dark on the inside of the counter, mites would have been willing to move within the counter at any time of the day.Fig. 2

Bottom Line: This validation study resulted in 17 data points of 'number of mites counted' by the automated mite counter and the 'number of mites present' in the experimental laying hen cages.The study demonstrated that the automated mite counter was able to track the D. gallinae population effectively.A wider evaluation showed that this automated mite counter can become a useful tool in IPM of D. gallinae in laying hen facilities.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Wageningen UR Livestock Research, P.O. Box 338, 6700 AH, Wageningen, The Netherlands, monique.mul@wur.nl.

ABSTRACT
For integrated pest management (IPM) programs to be maximally effective, monitoring of the growth and decline of the pest populations is essential. Here, we present the validation results of a new automated monitoring device for the poultry red mite (Dermanyssus gallinae), a serious pest in laying hen facilities world-wide. This monitoring device (called an "automated mite counter") was validated in experimental laying hen cages with live birds and a growing population of D. gallinae. This validation study resulted in 17 data points of 'number of mites counted' by the automated mite counter and the 'number of mites present' in the experimental laying hen cages. The study demonstrated that the automated mite counter was able to track the D. gallinae population effectively. A wider evaluation showed that this automated mite counter can become a useful tool in IPM of D. gallinae in laying hen facilities.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus