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Validation of an automated mite counter for Dermanyssus gallinae in experimental laying hen cages.

Mul MF, van Riel JW, Meerburg BG, Dicke M, George DR, Groot Koerkamp PW - Exp. Appl. Acarol. (2015)

Bottom Line: This validation study resulted in 17 data points of 'number of mites counted' by the automated mite counter and the 'number of mites present' in the experimental laying hen cages.The study demonstrated that the automated mite counter was able to track the D. gallinae population effectively.A wider evaluation showed that this automated mite counter can become a useful tool in IPM of D. gallinae in laying hen facilities.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Wageningen UR Livestock Research, P.O. Box 338, 6700 AH, Wageningen, The Netherlands, monique.mul@wur.nl.

ABSTRACT
For integrated pest management (IPM) programs to be maximally effective, monitoring of the growth and decline of the pest populations is essential. Here, we present the validation results of a new automated monitoring device for the poultry red mite (Dermanyssus gallinae), a serious pest in laying hen facilities world-wide. This monitoring device (called an "automated mite counter") was validated in experimental laying hen cages with live birds and a growing population of D. gallinae. This validation study resulted in 17 data points of 'number of mites counted' by the automated mite counter and the 'number of mites present' in the experimental laying hen cages. The study demonstrated that the automated mite counter was able to track the D. gallinae population effectively. A wider evaluation showed that this automated mite counter can become a useful tool in IPM of D. gallinae in laying hen facilities.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Schematic cross-section of the experimental laying hen cage
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Related In: Results  -  Collection


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Fig1: Schematic cross-section of the experimental laying hen cage

Mentions: Twelve experimental laying hen cages (Fig. 1) were used during the experiment. These cages were confirmed as being free of D. gallinae prior to the start of the experiment by (1) thorough cleaning, (2) visual inspection and (3) confirmation by zero counts of the automated counter during 2 days prior to the start of the trial. Cages (1.2 × 0.6 × 0.6 m) were open at the top, but to prevent the hens from escaping a metal grid with an access hole was used as a cover. The front of the cages was made of a transparent Perspex plate, and the structure of each cage was supported by two wooden beams. In each cage, approximately 50 % of the floor surface was filled with pine wood shavings. A manure tray, covered with a grid, filled the remaining floor surface. Above this manure tray, a metal perch was fixed through the front and rear cage wall. Under the perch, the automated mite counter was placed. Above the litter area, a feed box and a laying nest (0.3 × 0.4 × 0.5 m with a hole of 0.2 × 0.3 m) were placed. A drinking nipple with leakage cup was also placed above the manure tray, close to the right-hand wall. The nipple was connected to a closed water tank placed on a transparent plate on top of the metal grid. The whole cage was placed on bricks in a tray filled with water to ensure that mites could not move between different cages.Fig. 1


Validation of an automated mite counter for Dermanyssus gallinae in experimental laying hen cages.

Mul MF, van Riel JW, Meerburg BG, Dicke M, George DR, Groot Koerkamp PW - Exp. Appl. Acarol. (2015)

Schematic cross-section of the experimental laying hen cage
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4481303&req=5

Fig1: Schematic cross-section of the experimental laying hen cage
Mentions: Twelve experimental laying hen cages (Fig. 1) were used during the experiment. These cages were confirmed as being free of D. gallinae prior to the start of the experiment by (1) thorough cleaning, (2) visual inspection and (3) confirmation by zero counts of the automated counter during 2 days prior to the start of the trial. Cages (1.2 × 0.6 × 0.6 m) were open at the top, but to prevent the hens from escaping a metal grid with an access hole was used as a cover. The front of the cages was made of a transparent Perspex plate, and the structure of each cage was supported by two wooden beams. In each cage, approximately 50 % of the floor surface was filled with pine wood shavings. A manure tray, covered with a grid, filled the remaining floor surface. Above this manure tray, a metal perch was fixed through the front and rear cage wall. Under the perch, the automated mite counter was placed. Above the litter area, a feed box and a laying nest (0.3 × 0.4 × 0.5 m with a hole of 0.2 × 0.3 m) were placed. A drinking nipple with leakage cup was also placed above the manure tray, close to the right-hand wall. The nipple was connected to a closed water tank placed on a transparent plate on top of the metal grid. The whole cage was placed on bricks in a tray filled with water to ensure that mites could not move between different cages.Fig. 1

Bottom Line: This validation study resulted in 17 data points of 'number of mites counted' by the automated mite counter and the 'number of mites present' in the experimental laying hen cages.The study demonstrated that the automated mite counter was able to track the D. gallinae population effectively.A wider evaluation showed that this automated mite counter can become a useful tool in IPM of D. gallinae in laying hen facilities.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Wageningen UR Livestock Research, P.O. Box 338, 6700 AH, Wageningen, The Netherlands, monique.mul@wur.nl.

ABSTRACT
For integrated pest management (IPM) programs to be maximally effective, monitoring of the growth and decline of the pest populations is essential. Here, we present the validation results of a new automated monitoring device for the poultry red mite (Dermanyssus gallinae), a serious pest in laying hen facilities world-wide. This monitoring device (called an "automated mite counter") was validated in experimental laying hen cages with live birds and a growing population of D. gallinae. This validation study resulted in 17 data points of 'number of mites counted' by the automated mite counter and the 'number of mites present' in the experimental laying hen cages. The study demonstrated that the automated mite counter was able to track the D. gallinae population effectively. A wider evaluation showed that this automated mite counter can become a useful tool in IPM of D. gallinae in laying hen facilities.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus