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An update on the transport and metabolism of iron in Listeria monocytogenes: the role of proteins involved in pathogenicity.

Lechowicz J, Krawczyk-Balska A - Biometals (2015)

Bottom Line: In the human body it infects many different cell types, where it lives intracellularly, however it may also temporarily live extracellularly.In this review, data about the mechanisms of transport, metabolism and regulation of iron, including recent findings in these areas, are summarized with focus on the importance of these mechanisms for the virulence of L. monocytogenes.Furthermore, some of the proteins involved in iron homeostasis like Fri and FrvA seem to deserve special attention due to their potential use in the development of new therapeutic antilisterial strategies.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Applied Microbiology, Faculty of Biology, University of Warsaw, Miecznikowa 1, 02-096, Warsaw, Poland.

ABSTRACT
Listeria monocytogenes is a Gram-positive bacterium that causes a rare but severe human disease with high mortality rate. The microorganism is widespread in the natural environment where it shows a saprophytic lifestyle. In the human body it infects many different cell types, where it lives intracellularly, however it may also temporarily live extracellularly. The ability to survive and grow in such diverse niches suggests that this bacterium has a wide range of mechanisms for both the acquisition of various sources of iron and effective management of this microelement. In this review, data about the mechanisms of transport, metabolism and regulation of iron, including recent findings in these areas, are summarized with focus on the importance of these mechanisms for the virulence of L. monocytogenes. These data indicate the key role of haem transport and maintenance of intracellular iron homeostasis for the pathogenesis of L. monocytogenes. Furthermore, some of the proteins involved in iron homeostasis like Fri and FrvA seem to deserve special attention due to their potential use in the development of new therapeutic antilisterial strategies.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Regulon Fur of L. monocytogenes. Genetic organization of Fur regulated genes at 12 chromosomal loci. All genes are drawn approximately to scale using the L. monocytogenes EGDe genome sequence data. Loci numbers refer to the National Centre for Biotechnology Information annotation scheme. Genes in red indicate those identified exclusively in the study of McLaughlin et al. (2012), black ones indicate those identified exclusively in the study of Ledala et al. (2010), and white ones indicate those identified in both studies. Fur boxes are represented by black circles. Lollipops and dotted arrows are used to illustrate putative stem loop terminator regions and genes clustered into operons, respectively. (Color figure online)
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Fig3: Regulon Fur of L. monocytogenes. Genetic organization of Fur regulated genes at 12 chromosomal loci. All genes are drawn approximately to scale using the L. monocytogenes EGDe genome sequence data. Loci numbers refer to the National Centre for Biotechnology Information annotation scheme. Genes in red indicate those identified exclusively in the study of McLaughlin et al. (2012), black ones indicate those identified exclusively in the study of Ledala et al. (2010), and white ones indicate those identified in both studies. Fur boxes are represented by black circles. Lollipops and dotted arrows are used to illustrate putative stem loop terminator regions and genes clustered into operons, respectively. (Color figure online)

Mentions: Recently, the Fur regulon of L. monocytogenes has been subjected to two independent genome-wide studies. First, DNA microarray comparative analysis of gene expression changes in a Δfur mutant and wild-type strain in response to iron limitation was examined. This approach allowed the identification of 24 genes regulated by Fur under iron limitation conditions of which 14 were negatively regulated directly by Fur, including mostly genes encoding iron transporters (Ledala et al. 2010). In the second approach a genome-wide search for putative Fur-box consensus sequences in the genome of L. monocytogenes using the classical 19 bp Fur-binding motif defined in B. subtilis was performed. This led to the identification of 29 putative Fur-regulated loci whose regulation by Fur was further confirmed through comparative RT-PCR transcription analysis in wild-type and a Δfur mutant strain. The identified genes include hupDCG,fhuBCDG and fepCAB. This group also includes genes encoding proteins Fri, sortase B, FeoA, FeoB and proteins of unknown function as well as some genes which have not yet been identified through microarray analysis (McLaughlin et al. 2012). The genetic organisation and characteristic of genes belonging to Fur regulon of L. monocytogenes are presented in Fig. 3 and Table 1, respectively.Fig. 3


An update on the transport and metabolism of iron in Listeria monocytogenes: the role of proteins involved in pathogenicity.

Lechowicz J, Krawczyk-Balska A - Biometals (2015)

Regulon Fur of L. monocytogenes. Genetic organization of Fur regulated genes at 12 chromosomal loci. All genes are drawn approximately to scale using the L. monocytogenes EGDe genome sequence data. Loci numbers refer to the National Centre for Biotechnology Information annotation scheme. Genes in red indicate those identified exclusively in the study of McLaughlin et al. (2012), black ones indicate those identified exclusively in the study of Ledala et al. (2010), and white ones indicate those identified in both studies. Fur boxes are represented by black circles. Lollipops and dotted arrows are used to illustrate putative stem loop terminator regions and genes clustered into operons, respectively. (Color figure online)
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4481299&req=5

Fig3: Regulon Fur of L. monocytogenes. Genetic organization of Fur regulated genes at 12 chromosomal loci. All genes are drawn approximately to scale using the L. monocytogenes EGDe genome sequence data. Loci numbers refer to the National Centre for Biotechnology Information annotation scheme. Genes in red indicate those identified exclusively in the study of McLaughlin et al. (2012), black ones indicate those identified exclusively in the study of Ledala et al. (2010), and white ones indicate those identified in both studies. Fur boxes are represented by black circles. Lollipops and dotted arrows are used to illustrate putative stem loop terminator regions and genes clustered into operons, respectively. (Color figure online)
Mentions: Recently, the Fur regulon of L. monocytogenes has been subjected to two independent genome-wide studies. First, DNA microarray comparative analysis of gene expression changes in a Δfur mutant and wild-type strain in response to iron limitation was examined. This approach allowed the identification of 24 genes regulated by Fur under iron limitation conditions of which 14 were negatively regulated directly by Fur, including mostly genes encoding iron transporters (Ledala et al. 2010). In the second approach a genome-wide search for putative Fur-box consensus sequences in the genome of L. monocytogenes using the classical 19 bp Fur-binding motif defined in B. subtilis was performed. This led to the identification of 29 putative Fur-regulated loci whose regulation by Fur was further confirmed through comparative RT-PCR transcription analysis in wild-type and a Δfur mutant strain. The identified genes include hupDCG,fhuBCDG and fepCAB. This group also includes genes encoding proteins Fri, sortase B, FeoA, FeoB and proteins of unknown function as well as some genes which have not yet been identified through microarray analysis (McLaughlin et al. 2012). The genetic organisation and characteristic of genes belonging to Fur regulon of L. monocytogenes are presented in Fig. 3 and Table 1, respectively.Fig. 3

Bottom Line: In the human body it infects many different cell types, where it lives intracellularly, however it may also temporarily live extracellularly.In this review, data about the mechanisms of transport, metabolism and regulation of iron, including recent findings in these areas, are summarized with focus on the importance of these mechanisms for the virulence of L. monocytogenes.Furthermore, some of the proteins involved in iron homeostasis like Fri and FrvA seem to deserve special attention due to their potential use in the development of new therapeutic antilisterial strategies.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Applied Microbiology, Faculty of Biology, University of Warsaw, Miecznikowa 1, 02-096, Warsaw, Poland.

ABSTRACT
Listeria monocytogenes is a Gram-positive bacterium that causes a rare but severe human disease with high mortality rate. The microorganism is widespread in the natural environment where it shows a saprophytic lifestyle. In the human body it infects many different cell types, where it lives intracellularly, however it may also temporarily live extracellularly. The ability to survive and grow in such diverse niches suggests that this bacterium has a wide range of mechanisms for both the acquisition of various sources of iron and effective management of this microelement. In this review, data about the mechanisms of transport, metabolism and regulation of iron, including recent findings in these areas, are summarized with focus on the importance of these mechanisms for the virulence of L. monocytogenes. These data indicate the key role of haem transport and maintenance of intracellular iron homeostasis for the pathogenesis of L. monocytogenes. Furthermore, some of the proteins involved in iron homeostasis like Fri and FrvA seem to deserve special attention due to their potential use in the development of new therapeutic antilisterial strategies.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus