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An update on the transport and metabolism of iron in Listeria monocytogenes: the role of proteins involved in pathogenicity.

Lechowicz J, Krawczyk-Balska A - Biometals (2015)

Bottom Line: In the human body it infects many different cell types, where it lives intracellularly, however it may also temporarily live extracellularly.In this review, data about the mechanisms of transport, metabolism and regulation of iron, including recent findings in these areas, are summarized with focus on the importance of these mechanisms for the virulence of L. monocytogenes.Furthermore, some of the proteins involved in iron homeostasis like Fri and FrvA seem to deserve special attention due to their potential use in the development of new therapeutic antilisterial strategies.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Applied Microbiology, Faculty of Biology, University of Warsaw, Miecznikowa 1, 02-096, Warsaw, Poland.

ABSTRACT
Listeria monocytogenes is a Gram-positive bacterium that causes a rare but severe human disease with high mortality rate. The microorganism is widespread in the natural environment where it shows a saprophytic lifestyle. In the human body it infects many different cell types, where it lives intracellularly, however it may also temporarily live extracellularly. The ability to survive and grow in such diverse niches suggests that this bacterium has a wide range of mechanisms for both the acquisition of various sources of iron and effective management of this microelement. In this review, data about the mechanisms of transport, metabolism and regulation of iron, including recent findings in these areas, are summarized with focus on the importance of these mechanisms for the virulence of L. monocytogenes. These data indicate the key role of haem transport and maintenance of intracellular iron homeostasis for the pathogenesis of L. monocytogenes. Furthermore, some of the proteins involved in iron homeostasis like Fri and FrvA seem to deserve special attention due to their potential use in the development of new therapeutic antilisterial strategies.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Usage of ferrous iron within L. monocytogenes cells. Fe2+ ions are primarily used in biological processes, either directly or as a component of haem or iron–sulphur clusters, which act as cofactors of many proteins. Proteins involved in the biosynthesis of haem and Fe–S clusters are given in parentheses. Physiological processes involving iron are given along with examples of engaged proteins. Fe2+ ions may also be stored in the single iron storage protein of L. monocytogenes, i.e. the ferritin-like protein Fri. Furthermore, Fe2+ ions can form complexes with the Fur regulator participating in this way indirectly in the regulation of the expression of genes involved in the transport and metabolism of iron
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Fig2: Usage of ferrous iron within L. monocytogenes cells. Fe2+ ions are primarily used in biological processes, either directly or as a component of haem or iron–sulphur clusters, which act as cofactors of many proteins. Proteins involved in the biosynthesis of haem and Fe–S clusters are given in parentheses. Physiological processes involving iron are given along with examples of engaged proteins. Fe2+ ions may also be stored in the single iron storage protein of L. monocytogenes, i.e. the ferritin-like protein Fri. Furthermore, Fe2+ ions can form complexes with the Fur regulator participating in this way indirectly in the regulation of the expression of genes involved in the transport and metabolism of iron

Mentions: Fe2+ ions present in the cell participate also indirectly in the regulation of the expression of genes engaged in the acquisition and metabolism of iron. This regulation involves the global regulator Fur which forms complexes with iron and binds to a specific DNA sequence (so-called fur-box) in conditions of unrestricted availability of iron. Fur-boxes are located upstream of the gene undergoing regulation. Binding of Fur regulator represses the expression of these genes. However, there are reports that Fur can also act as a negative regulator without binding iron ions and that it can function as an activator (Escolar et al. 1999; Andrews et al. 2003; Troxell and Hassan 2013). Possible modes of the management of iron inside the L. monocytogenes cell are schematically shown in Fig. 2.Fig. 2


An update on the transport and metabolism of iron in Listeria monocytogenes: the role of proteins involved in pathogenicity.

Lechowicz J, Krawczyk-Balska A - Biometals (2015)

Usage of ferrous iron within L. monocytogenes cells. Fe2+ ions are primarily used in biological processes, either directly or as a component of haem or iron–sulphur clusters, which act as cofactors of many proteins. Proteins involved in the biosynthesis of haem and Fe–S clusters are given in parentheses. Physiological processes involving iron are given along with examples of engaged proteins. Fe2+ ions may also be stored in the single iron storage protein of L. monocytogenes, i.e. the ferritin-like protein Fri. Furthermore, Fe2+ ions can form complexes with the Fur regulator participating in this way indirectly in the regulation of the expression of genes involved in the transport and metabolism of iron
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4481299&req=5

Fig2: Usage of ferrous iron within L. monocytogenes cells. Fe2+ ions are primarily used in biological processes, either directly or as a component of haem or iron–sulphur clusters, which act as cofactors of many proteins. Proteins involved in the biosynthesis of haem and Fe–S clusters are given in parentheses. Physiological processes involving iron are given along with examples of engaged proteins. Fe2+ ions may also be stored in the single iron storage protein of L. monocytogenes, i.e. the ferritin-like protein Fri. Furthermore, Fe2+ ions can form complexes with the Fur regulator participating in this way indirectly in the regulation of the expression of genes involved in the transport and metabolism of iron
Mentions: Fe2+ ions present in the cell participate also indirectly in the regulation of the expression of genes engaged in the acquisition and metabolism of iron. This regulation involves the global regulator Fur which forms complexes with iron and binds to a specific DNA sequence (so-called fur-box) in conditions of unrestricted availability of iron. Fur-boxes are located upstream of the gene undergoing regulation. Binding of Fur regulator represses the expression of these genes. However, there are reports that Fur can also act as a negative regulator without binding iron ions and that it can function as an activator (Escolar et al. 1999; Andrews et al. 2003; Troxell and Hassan 2013). Possible modes of the management of iron inside the L. monocytogenes cell are schematically shown in Fig. 2.Fig. 2

Bottom Line: In the human body it infects many different cell types, where it lives intracellularly, however it may also temporarily live extracellularly.In this review, data about the mechanisms of transport, metabolism and regulation of iron, including recent findings in these areas, are summarized with focus on the importance of these mechanisms for the virulence of L. monocytogenes.Furthermore, some of the proteins involved in iron homeostasis like Fri and FrvA seem to deserve special attention due to their potential use in the development of new therapeutic antilisterial strategies.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Applied Microbiology, Faculty of Biology, University of Warsaw, Miecznikowa 1, 02-096, Warsaw, Poland.

ABSTRACT
Listeria monocytogenes is a Gram-positive bacterium that causes a rare but severe human disease with high mortality rate. The microorganism is widespread in the natural environment where it shows a saprophytic lifestyle. In the human body it infects many different cell types, where it lives intracellularly, however it may also temporarily live extracellularly. The ability to survive and grow in such diverse niches suggests that this bacterium has a wide range of mechanisms for both the acquisition of various sources of iron and effective management of this microelement. In this review, data about the mechanisms of transport, metabolism and regulation of iron, including recent findings in these areas, are summarized with focus on the importance of these mechanisms for the virulence of L. monocytogenes. These data indicate the key role of haem transport and maintenance of intracellular iron homeostasis for the pathogenesis of L. monocytogenes. Furthermore, some of the proteins involved in iron homeostasis like Fri and FrvA seem to deserve special attention due to their potential use in the development of new therapeutic antilisterial strategies.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus