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Ointment of Brassica oleracea var. capitata Matures the Extracellular Matrix in Skin Wounds of Wistar Rats.

Sarandy MM, Novaes RD, da Matta SL, Mezencio JM, da Silva MB, Zanuncio JC, Gonçalves RV - Evid Based Complement Alternat Med (2015)

Bottom Line: These products were applied daily for 20 days and every four days the tissues of different wounds were removed.In the groups that received ointment and balsam there was reduction in the wound area on days 4, 8, 12, and 20.B. oleracea was effective in stimulating the maturation of collagen and increasing the cellularity, as also in improving the mechanical resistance of the newly formed tissue.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of General Biology, Federal University of Viçosa, 36570-000 Viçosa, MG, Brazil.

ABSTRACT
Wound healing is a complex process that aims to restore damaged tissue. Phytotherapeutics, such as cabbage, Brassica oleracea var. capitata (Brassicaceae), and sunflower, Helianthus annuus L. (Asteraceae) oil, are used as wound healers. Five circular wounds, each 12 mm in diameter, were made in the dorsolateral region of each rat. The animals were divided into four groups: balsam (B. oleracea); ointment (B. oleracea); sunflower oil (Helianthus annuus); control (saline solution 0.9%). These products were applied daily for 20 days and every four days the tissues of different wounds were removed. The wound contraction area, total collagen, types I and III collagen, glycosaminoglycans, and tissue cellularity were analyzed. In the groups that received ointment and balsam there was reduction in the wound area on days 4, 8, 12, and 20. Throughout the trial period, the balsam and ointment groups showed a higher amount of total collagen, type I collagen, and glycosaminoglycan compared to the others groups. The rats in the groups treated with B. oleracea var. capitata showed a higher number of cells on days 8, 16, and 20. B. oleracea was effective in stimulating the maturation of collagen and increasing the cellularity, as also in improving the mechanical resistance of the newly formed tissue.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Representative photomicrographs of tissue cellularity in skin sections of rats observed under light microscope (H&E staining, bars = 25 μm). Tissue fragments were collected from different wounds on days 0, 4, 8, 16, and 20 days. Balsam: Brassica oleracea oil; ointment: Brassica oleracea lanolin; sunflower: Helianthus annuus oil; control: 0.9% saline solution.
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Related In: Results  -  Collection


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fig3: Representative photomicrographs of tissue cellularity in skin sections of rats observed under light microscope (H&E staining, bars = 25 μm). Tissue fragments were collected from different wounds on days 0, 4, 8, 16, and 20 days. Balsam: Brassica oleracea oil; ointment: Brassica oleracea lanolin; sunflower: Helianthus annuus oil; control: 0.9% saline solution.

Mentions: The number of cells in the groups treated with balsam and ointment (B. oleracea var. capitata) increased on days 16 and 20 compared to the H. annuus and control groups (Figures 2(c) and 3). After analysis of Figure 2(a) increased density of blood vessels was observed mainly in the balsam group compared to the other groups.


Ointment of Brassica oleracea var. capitata Matures the Extracellular Matrix in Skin Wounds of Wistar Rats.

Sarandy MM, Novaes RD, da Matta SL, Mezencio JM, da Silva MB, Zanuncio JC, Gonçalves RV - Evid Based Complement Alternat Med (2015)

Representative photomicrographs of tissue cellularity in skin sections of rats observed under light microscope (H&E staining, bars = 25 μm). Tissue fragments were collected from different wounds on days 0, 4, 8, 16, and 20 days. Balsam: Brassica oleracea oil; ointment: Brassica oleracea lanolin; sunflower: Helianthus annuus oil; control: 0.9% saline solution.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4481082&req=5

fig3: Representative photomicrographs of tissue cellularity in skin sections of rats observed under light microscope (H&E staining, bars = 25 μm). Tissue fragments were collected from different wounds on days 0, 4, 8, 16, and 20 days. Balsam: Brassica oleracea oil; ointment: Brassica oleracea lanolin; sunflower: Helianthus annuus oil; control: 0.9% saline solution.
Mentions: The number of cells in the groups treated with balsam and ointment (B. oleracea var. capitata) increased on days 16 and 20 compared to the H. annuus and control groups (Figures 2(c) and 3). After analysis of Figure 2(a) increased density of blood vessels was observed mainly in the balsam group compared to the other groups.

Bottom Line: These products were applied daily for 20 days and every four days the tissues of different wounds were removed.In the groups that received ointment and balsam there was reduction in the wound area on days 4, 8, 12, and 20.B. oleracea was effective in stimulating the maturation of collagen and increasing the cellularity, as also in improving the mechanical resistance of the newly formed tissue.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of General Biology, Federal University of Viçosa, 36570-000 Viçosa, MG, Brazil.

ABSTRACT
Wound healing is a complex process that aims to restore damaged tissue. Phytotherapeutics, such as cabbage, Brassica oleracea var. capitata (Brassicaceae), and sunflower, Helianthus annuus L. (Asteraceae) oil, are used as wound healers. Five circular wounds, each 12 mm in diameter, were made in the dorsolateral region of each rat. The animals were divided into four groups: balsam (B. oleracea); ointment (B. oleracea); sunflower oil (Helianthus annuus); control (saline solution 0.9%). These products were applied daily for 20 days and every four days the tissues of different wounds were removed. The wound contraction area, total collagen, types I and III collagen, glycosaminoglycans, and tissue cellularity were analyzed. In the groups that received ointment and balsam there was reduction in the wound area on days 4, 8, 12, and 20. Throughout the trial period, the balsam and ointment groups showed a higher amount of total collagen, type I collagen, and glycosaminoglycan compared to the others groups. The rats in the groups treated with B. oleracea var. capitata showed a higher number of cells on days 8, 16, and 20. B. oleracea was effective in stimulating the maturation of collagen and increasing the cellularity, as also in improving the mechanical resistance of the newly formed tissue.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus