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Evaluation of antibiotic prescription in the Lebanese community: a pilot study.

Saleh N, Awada S, Awwad R, Jibai S, Arfoul C, Zaiter L, Dib W, Salameh P - Infect Ecol Epidemiol (2015)

Bottom Line: The study also showed that the choice of the prescribed antibiotic was appropriate in 61.5% of the studied cases, while the prescribed dose and the duration of the treatment were inaccurate in 52 and 64% of the cases, respectively.This study showed a high prevalence of inappropriate antibiotic prescriptions in Lebanon.Therefore, actions should be taken to optimize antibiotic prescription.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Epidemiology & Biostatistics Department, Faculty of Public Health II, Lebanese University, Beirut, Lebanon.

ABSTRACT

Background: Antibiotics are considered among the most commonly prescribed drug classes in developing countries. Inappropriate prescription of antibiotics is a major public health concern and is related to the development of antimicrobial resistance.

Objective: This study aimed at assessing the appropriateness of antibiotic prescription by non-infectious disease physicians in a community setting in Lebanon.

Methods: A pilot cross-sectional study was undertaken on community pharmacy patients presenting with antibiotic prescription. It was performed over a period of 4 months in different regions of Lebanon. Participants answered a questionnaire inquiring about socio-demographic characteristics, medical conditions, symptoms that required medical attention, the doctor's diagnosis, the prescribed antibiotic, and whether laboratory tests were ordered to identify the causative organism or not. Data were analyzed using SPSS 17.

Results: We studied 270 patients (49.3% males and 50.7% females). This study showed that the most-prescribed antibiotics were the cephalosporins (82%) and that almost half of the illnesses for which antibiotics were prescribed were respiratory tract infections (41%). The study also showed that the choice of the prescribed antibiotic was appropriate in 61.5% of the studied cases, while the prescribed dose and the duration of the treatment were inaccurate in 52 and 64% of the cases, respectively. In addition, fever seemed to be a factor that influenced the physician's prescriptions, since the choice of drug conformity to guidelines increased from 53.7% (1 day of fever) to 88.9% (1 week of fever), and the dose prescription compliance to guidelines was higher (55.9%) for patients suffering from fever compared to those with no fever (38.1%).

Conclusion: This study showed a high prevalence of inappropriate antibiotic prescriptions in Lebanon. Therefore, actions should be taken to optimize antibiotic prescription.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Percentages of conformity and non-conformity of antibiotic choice, dose, duration of treatment, and global conformity to Infectious Diseases Society of America guidelines.
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Figure 0001: Percentages of conformity and non-conformity of antibiotic choice, dose, duration of treatment, and global conformity to Infectious Diseases Society of America guidelines.

Mentions: Our study has shown that 61.54% of doctors have prescribed the right antibiotic against 38.46% (95% CI 32.66; 44.26) of doctors who failed to do so. In the majority of the studied cases, the dose prescribed was inappropriate (52.01%) (95% CI 46.05; 57.97), and so was the duration of treatment, where 63.74% (95% CI 58.01; 69.47) of doctors did not prescribe the antibiotic for the right duration. When all of the aforementioned factors were summed together, it turned out that 72.16% of antibiotic prescriptions (95% CI 69.43; 74.89) did not adhere to guidelines (Fig. 1).


Evaluation of antibiotic prescription in the Lebanese community: a pilot study.

Saleh N, Awada S, Awwad R, Jibai S, Arfoul C, Zaiter L, Dib W, Salameh P - Infect Ecol Epidemiol (2015)

Percentages of conformity and non-conformity of antibiotic choice, dose, duration of treatment, and global conformity to Infectious Diseases Society of America guidelines.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4481048&req=5

Figure 0001: Percentages of conformity and non-conformity of antibiotic choice, dose, duration of treatment, and global conformity to Infectious Diseases Society of America guidelines.
Mentions: Our study has shown that 61.54% of doctors have prescribed the right antibiotic against 38.46% (95% CI 32.66; 44.26) of doctors who failed to do so. In the majority of the studied cases, the dose prescribed was inappropriate (52.01%) (95% CI 46.05; 57.97), and so was the duration of treatment, where 63.74% (95% CI 58.01; 69.47) of doctors did not prescribe the antibiotic for the right duration. When all of the aforementioned factors were summed together, it turned out that 72.16% of antibiotic prescriptions (95% CI 69.43; 74.89) did not adhere to guidelines (Fig. 1).

Bottom Line: The study also showed that the choice of the prescribed antibiotic was appropriate in 61.5% of the studied cases, while the prescribed dose and the duration of the treatment were inaccurate in 52 and 64% of the cases, respectively.This study showed a high prevalence of inappropriate antibiotic prescriptions in Lebanon.Therefore, actions should be taken to optimize antibiotic prescription.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Epidemiology & Biostatistics Department, Faculty of Public Health II, Lebanese University, Beirut, Lebanon.

ABSTRACT

Background: Antibiotics are considered among the most commonly prescribed drug classes in developing countries. Inappropriate prescription of antibiotics is a major public health concern and is related to the development of antimicrobial resistance.

Objective: This study aimed at assessing the appropriateness of antibiotic prescription by non-infectious disease physicians in a community setting in Lebanon.

Methods: A pilot cross-sectional study was undertaken on community pharmacy patients presenting with antibiotic prescription. It was performed over a period of 4 months in different regions of Lebanon. Participants answered a questionnaire inquiring about socio-demographic characteristics, medical conditions, symptoms that required medical attention, the doctor's diagnosis, the prescribed antibiotic, and whether laboratory tests were ordered to identify the causative organism or not. Data were analyzed using SPSS 17.

Results: We studied 270 patients (49.3% males and 50.7% females). This study showed that the most-prescribed antibiotics were the cephalosporins (82%) and that almost half of the illnesses for which antibiotics were prescribed were respiratory tract infections (41%). The study also showed that the choice of the prescribed antibiotic was appropriate in 61.5% of the studied cases, while the prescribed dose and the duration of the treatment were inaccurate in 52 and 64% of the cases, respectively. In addition, fever seemed to be a factor that influenced the physician's prescriptions, since the choice of drug conformity to guidelines increased from 53.7% (1 day of fever) to 88.9% (1 week of fever), and the dose prescription compliance to guidelines was higher (55.9%) for patients suffering from fever compared to those with no fever (38.1%).

Conclusion: This study showed a high prevalence of inappropriate antibiotic prescriptions in Lebanon. Therefore, actions should be taken to optimize antibiotic prescription.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus