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Economic benefits of the Mediterranean-style diet consumption in Canada and the United States.

Abdullah MM, Jones JP, Jones PJ - Food Nutr Res (2015)

Bottom Line: The objective of this study was to estimate the annual healthcare and societal cost savings that would accrue to the Canadian and American public, independently, as a result of a reduction in the incidence of CVD following adherence to a MedDiet.A variation in cost-of-illness analysis entailing three stages of estimations was developed to 1) identify the proportion of individuals who are likely to adopt a MedDiet in North America, 2) assess the impact of the MedDiet intake on CVD incidence reduction, and 3) impute the potential savings in costs associated with healthcare and productivity following the estimated CVD reduction.Closer adherence to dietary behaviors that are consistent with the principles of the MedDiet is expected to contribute to a reduction in the monetary burdens of CVD in Canada, the United States, and possibly other parts of the world.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Human Nutritional Sciences, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, Canada.

ABSTRACT

Background: The Mediterranean-style diet (MedDiet) is an established healthy-eating behavior that has consistently been shown to favorably impact cardiovascular health, thus likely improving quality of life and reducing costs associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD). Data on the economic benefits of MedDiet intakes are, however, scarce.

Objective: The objective of this study was to estimate the annual healthcare and societal cost savings that would accrue to the Canadian and American public, independently, as a result of a reduction in the incidence of CVD following adherence to a MedDiet.

Design: A variation in cost-of-illness analysis entailing three stages of estimations was developed to 1) identify the proportion of individuals who are likely to adopt a MedDiet in North America, 2) assess the impact of the MedDiet intake on CVD incidence reduction, and 3) impute the potential savings in costs associated with healthcare and productivity following the estimated CVD reduction. To account for the uncertainty factor, a sensitivity analysis of four scenarios, including ideal, optimistic, pessimistic, and very-pessimistic assumptions, was implemented within each of these stages.

Results: Significant improvements in CVD-related costs were evident with varying MedDiet adoption and CVD reduction rates. Specifically, CAD $41.9 million to 2.5 billion in Canada and US $1.0-62.8 billion in the United States were estimated to accrue as total annual savings in economic costs, given the 'very-pessimistic' through 'ideal' scenarios.

Conclusions: Closer adherence to dietary behaviors that are consistent with the principles of the MedDiet is expected to contribute to a reduction in the monetary burdens of CVD in Canada, the United States, and possibly other parts of the world.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The study's economic framework utilizing a variation of cost-of-illness analysis of three stages of estimations. Based on data from recent peer-reviewed literature and national databases, the first stage identified the proportions of individuals who are likely to adhere to a MedDiet in Canada and the United States, the second assessed the reported cardiovascular disease reduction rate following a MedDiet consumption, and the third stage imputed the potential reduction in economic costs associated with the estimated CVD incidence reduction. In covering a wide range of predictions, each stage constituted four scenarios of assumptions reflecting best- through worst-case scenarios as follows: ideal, optimistic, pessimistic, and very-pessimistic.
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Figure 0001: The study's economic framework utilizing a variation of cost-of-illness analysis of three stages of estimations. Based on data from recent peer-reviewed literature and national databases, the first stage identified the proportions of individuals who are likely to adhere to a MedDiet in Canada and the United States, the second assessed the reported cardiovascular disease reduction rate following a MedDiet consumption, and the third stage imputed the potential reduction in economic costs associated with the estimated CVD incidence reduction. In covering a wide range of predictions, each stage constituted four scenarios of assumptions reflecting best- through worst-case scenarios as follows: ideal, optimistic, pessimistic, and very-pessimistic.

Mentions: In a conceptual framework design, a three-stage variation of cost-of-illness analysis was employed. This is an adapted version of a model that was originally presented by Malla et al. (23) and Gyles et al. (24) for economic benefits of canola oil and plant sterol consumptions, respectively. The first stage of the present model identified the proportion of individuals who are likely to adhere to a MedDiet in Canada and the United States based on the available nutrition literature. The second stage, again based on current medical literature, assessed the action of a MedDiet in terms of CVD incidence reduction. Finally, the third stage imputed the potential savings in healthcare- and society-related costs following the estimated CVD risk reduction. Figure 1 depicts the three stages of the economic model described in this article. In quest of the most robust predictions in a range of assumptions, four scenarios were generated within each stage of assessment using a sensitivity analysis as follows: ideal (best-case scenario), optimistic, pessimistic, and very pessimistic (worst-case scenario), as previously (24).


Economic benefits of the Mediterranean-style diet consumption in Canada and the United States.

Abdullah MM, Jones JP, Jones PJ - Food Nutr Res (2015)

The study's economic framework utilizing a variation of cost-of-illness analysis of three stages of estimations. Based on data from recent peer-reviewed literature and national databases, the first stage identified the proportions of individuals who are likely to adhere to a MedDiet in Canada and the United States, the second assessed the reported cardiovascular disease reduction rate following a MedDiet consumption, and the third stage imputed the potential reduction in economic costs associated with the estimated CVD incidence reduction. In covering a wide range of predictions, each stage constituted four scenarios of assumptions reflecting best- through worst-case scenarios as follows: ideal, optimistic, pessimistic, and very-pessimistic.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4481044&req=5

Figure 0001: The study's economic framework utilizing a variation of cost-of-illness analysis of three stages of estimations. Based on data from recent peer-reviewed literature and national databases, the first stage identified the proportions of individuals who are likely to adhere to a MedDiet in Canada and the United States, the second assessed the reported cardiovascular disease reduction rate following a MedDiet consumption, and the third stage imputed the potential reduction in economic costs associated with the estimated CVD incidence reduction. In covering a wide range of predictions, each stage constituted four scenarios of assumptions reflecting best- through worst-case scenarios as follows: ideal, optimistic, pessimistic, and very-pessimistic.
Mentions: In a conceptual framework design, a three-stage variation of cost-of-illness analysis was employed. This is an adapted version of a model that was originally presented by Malla et al. (23) and Gyles et al. (24) for economic benefits of canola oil and plant sterol consumptions, respectively. The first stage of the present model identified the proportion of individuals who are likely to adhere to a MedDiet in Canada and the United States based on the available nutrition literature. The second stage, again based on current medical literature, assessed the action of a MedDiet in terms of CVD incidence reduction. Finally, the third stage imputed the potential savings in healthcare- and society-related costs following the estimated CVD risk reduction. Figure 1 depicts the three stages of the economic model described in this article. In quest of the most robust predictions in a range of assumptions, four scenarios were generated within each stage of assessment using a sensitivity analysis as follows: ideal (best-case scenario), optimistic, pessimistic, and very pessimistic (worst-case scenario), as previously (24).

Bottom Line: The objective of this study was to estimate the annual healthcare and societal cost savings that would accrue to the Canadian and American public, independently, as a result of a reduction in the incidence of CVD following adherence to a MedDiet.A variation in cost-of-illness analysis entailing three stages of estimations was developed to 1) identify the proportion of individuals who are likely to adopt a MedDiet in North America, 2) assess the impact of the MedDiet intake on CVD incidence reduction, and 3) impute the potential savings in costs associated with healthcare and productivity following the estimated CVD reduction.Closer adherence to dietary behaviors that are consistent with the principles of the MedDiet is expected to contribute to a reduction in the monetary burdens of CVD in Canada, the United States, and possibly other parts of the world.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Human Nutritional Sciences, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, Canada.

ABSTRACT

Background: The Mediterranean-style diet (MedDiet) is an established healthy-eating behavior that has consistently been shown to favorably impact cardiovascular health, thus likely improving quality of life and reducing costs associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD). Data on the economic benefits of MedDiet intakes are, however, scarce.

Objective: The objective of this study was to estimate the annual healthcare and societal cost savings that would accrue to the Canadian and American public, independently, as a result of a reduction in the incidence of CVD following adherence to a MedDiet.

Design: A variation in cost-of-illness analysis entailing three stages of estimations was developed to 1) identify the proportion of individuals who are likely to adopt a MedDiet in North America, 2) assess the impact of the MedDiet intake on CVD incidence reduction, and 3) impute the potential savings in costs associated with healthcare and productivity following the estimated CVD reduction. To account for the uncertainty factor, a sensitivity analysis of four scenarios, including ideal, optimistic, pessimistic, and very-pessimistic assumptions, was implemented within each of these stages.

Results: Significant improvements in CVD-related costs were evident with varying MedDiet adoption and CVD reduction rates. Specifically, CAD $41.9 million to 2.5 billion in Canada and US $1.0-62.8 billion in the United States were estimated to accrue as total annual savings in economic costs, given the 'very-pessimistic' through 'ideal' scenarios.

Conclusions: Closer adherence to dietary behaviors that are consistent with the principles of the MedDiet is expected to contribute to a reduction in the monetary burdens of CVD in Canada, the United States, and possibly other parts of the world.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus