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Preterm born 9-year-olds have elevated IGF-1 and low prolactin, but levels vary with behavioural and eating disorders.

Kistner A, Deschmann E, Legnevall L, Vanpee M - Acta Paediatr. (2014)

Bottom Line: Preterm children had lower prolactin (p = 0.01) and higher IGF-I than controls (p < 0.05, adjusted for confounders), despite being significantly shorter than the predicted target height (p < 0.001).These disorders were associated with lower leptin (p < 0.01), insulin (p < 0.05) and IGF-I (p < 0.05), but correlations between these hormones and leptin were similar among the groups.This raises speculation about IGF-I receptor insensitivity.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Rolf Luft Research Center for Diabetes and Endocrinology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Correlation between insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-I) and prolactin levels in the different groups. Symbols represent preterm children with (•) or without (o) behavioural/eating disorders and term- small for gestational age (SGA) and controls (full-term group) with () or without () behavioural or eating disorders. IGF-1 was inversely correlated with prolactin in the preterm group (solid line; r = −0.38, p = 0.046); in contrast, the combined term-SGA and controls showed a positive correlation (dashed line; r = 0.23, p < 0.1). The mean IGF-I in the entire cohort was 207 μg/L. When the rounded-off mean value (210 μg/L) was used as a threshold value, it was clear that preterm children with IGF-1 levels below 210 μg/L had a significantly higher incidence (p < 0.05) of behavioural/and or eating disorders than those with IGF-1 levels above the threshold (Pearson's χ2 test).
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fig01: Correlation between insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-I) and prolactin levels in the different groups. Symbols represent preterm children with (•) or without (o) behavioural/eating disorders and term- small for gestational age (SGA) and controls (full-term group) with () or without () behavioural or eating disorders. IGF-1 was inversely correlated with prolactin in the preterm group (solid line; r = −0.38, p = 0.046); in contrast, the combined term-SGA and controls showed a positive correlation (dashed line; r = 0.23, p < 0.1). The mean IGF-I in the entire cohort was 207 μg/L. When the rounded-off mean value (210 μg/L) was used as a threshold value, it was clear that preterm children with IGF-1 levels below 210 μg/L had a significantly higher incidence (p < 0.05) of behavioural/and or eating disorders than those with IGF-1 levels above the threshold (Pearson's χ2 test).

Mentions: Prolactin was inversely correlated with weight (r = −0.33, p < 0.01) and height (r = −0.23, p < 0.05) in all subjects (n = 80). The preterm group had lower prolactin levels than the term-SGA group (p = 0.029, adjusted for age, gender, weight and height) and the control group (p = 0.015, adjusted for age, gender, weight and height) (Table 2). Adding catch-up group as a covariable, the difference in prolactin levels between the preterm group and controls became more significant (p = 0.007, adjusted for age, gender, weight, height and catch-up height). Prolactin did not differ between genders in the preterm group (p = 0.43). IGF-I levels did not correlated significantly with catch-up height (preterm group r = 0.15, p = 0.44, term-SGA r = 0.08, p = 0.72 and controls r = 0.27, p = 0.15) or with catch-up weight (preterm r = 0.37, p = 0.06, term-SGA r = 0.23, p = 0.28 and controls r = 0.02, p = 0.91). Adjusted IGF-I levels were higher in the preterm group than in the control group (p = 0.021), and adding catch-up height as a covariable had no effect on this calculation. The adjusted serum cortisol levels tended to be lower in the preterm group compared with controls (p = 0.05). No differences were observed between the groups regarding the other hormones (Table 2). IGF-I levels were inversely correlated with prolactin in the preterm group (r = −0.39, p < 0.05), but this correlation was not observed in the combined group of term-SGA and controls (Fig.1).


Preterm born 9-year-olds have elevated IGF-1 and low prolactin, but levels vary with behavioural and eating disorders.

Kistner A, Deschmann E, Legnevall L, Vanpee M - Acta Paediatr. (2014)

Correlation between insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-I) and prolactin levels in the different groups. Symbols represent preterm children with (•) or without (o) behavioural/eating disorders and term- small for gestational age (SGA) and controls (full-term group) with () or without () behavioural or eating disorders. IGF-1 was inversely correlated with prolactin in the preterm group (solid line; r = −0.38, p = 0.046); in contrast, the combined term-SGA and controls showed a positive correlation (dashed line; r = 0.23, p < 0.1). The mean IGF-I in the entire cohort was 207 μg/L. When the rounded-off mean value (210 μg/L) was used as a threshold value, it was clear that preterm children with IGF-1 levels below 210 μg/L had a significantly higher incidence (p < 0.05) of behavioural/and or eating disorders than those with IGF-1 levels above the threshold (Pearson's χ2 test).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

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fig01: Correlation between insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-I) and prolactin levels in the different groups. Symbols represent preterm children with (•) or without (o) behavioural/eating disorders and term- small for gestational age (SGA) and controls (full-term group) with () or without () behavioural or eating disorders. IGF-1 was inversely correlated with prolactin in the preterm group (solid line; r = −0.38, p = 0.046); in contrast, the combined term-SGA and controls showed a positive correlation (dashed line; r = 0.23, p < 0.1). The mean IGF-I in the entire cohort was 207 μg/L. When the rounded-off mean value (210 μg/L) was used as a threshold value, it was clear that preterm children with IGF-1 levels below 210 μg/L had a significantly higher incidence (p < 0.05) of behavioural/and or eating disorders than those with IGF-1 levels above the threshold (Pearson's χ2 test).
Mentions: Prolactin was inversely correlated with weight (r = −0.33, p < 0.01) and height (r = −0.23, p < 0.05) in all subjects (n = 80). The preterm group had lower prolactin levels than the term-SGA group (p = 0.029, adjusted for age, gender, weight and height) and the control group (p = 0.015, adjusted for age, gender, weight and height) (Table 2). Adding catch-up group as a covariable, the difference in prolactin levels between the preterm group and controls became more significant (p = 0.007, adjusted for age, gender, weight, height and catch-up height). Prolactin did not differ between genders in the preterm group (p = 0.43). IGF-I levels did not correlated significantly with catch-up height (preterm group r = 0.15, p = 0.44, term-SGA r = 0.08, p = 0.72 and controls r = 0.27, p = 0.15) or with catch-up weight (preterm r = 0.37, p = 0.06, term-SGA r = 0.23, p = 0.28 and controls r = 0.02, p = 0.91). Adjusted IGF-I levels were higher in the preterm group than in the control group (p = 0.021), and adding catch-up height as a covariable had no effect on this calculation. The adjusted serum cortisol levels tended to be lower in the preterm group compared with controls (p = 0.05). No differences were observed between the groups regarding the other hormones (Table 2). IGF-I levels were inversely correlated with prolactin in the preterm group (r = −0.39, p < 0.05), but this correlation was not observed in the combined group of term-SGA and controls (Fig.1).

Bottom Line: Preterm children had lower prolactin (p = 0.01) and higher IGF-I than controls (p < 0.05, adjusted for confounders), despite being significantly shorter than the predicted target height (p < 0.001).These disorders were associated with lower leptin (p < 0.01), insulin (p < 0.05) and IGF-I (p < 0.05), but correlations between these hormones and leptin were similar among the groups.This raises speculation about IGF-I receptor insensitivity.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Rolf Luft Research Center for Diabetes and Endocrinology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus