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Psychiatry: Past, Present and Prospect

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The editors of this prodigiously ambitious collection of personal essays hint that they strived with some difficulty to extract from their distinguished authors personal views of how psychiatry has developed during the course of the past 50 years... The editors did not want a series of academic reviews but more the experience and wisdom gleaned during successful careers... Every practising psychiatrist and trainee should read this book... I did not just read it, I devoured it, but readers beware, I put down the finished book with a disturbing sense of disappointment... The perennial indecisiveness about the boundaries of psychiatry’s responsibilities, the repeated creation of social movements that ultimately fail to shift patients’ life chances, the deficiency in translating what we know from social psychiatric studies into practical treatment modalities, the ever-shifting ethical sands of risk and restraint and the almost total lack of significant improvement in medications after imipramine in 1940 and clozapine in the 1960s, all this makes disturbing reading... Yet many essays contain scholarly reviews of fruitful paths of research that have not quite yielded success yet, such as Peter McGuffin on genetics, Steven Hyman on neuroscience, Edwin Harari on personality disorders... I have one criticism and this is not of the authors or editors... Oxford University Press should surely have produced this book in a better-quality format... It is printed in a small font (although not as small as this journal!) and the cover is somewhere between dull and unfathomable; it looks cheap... A tome so rich in content deserves a more sumptuous coat.

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Psychiatry: Past, Present and Prospect
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
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getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4478903&req=5

View Article: PubMed Central

AUTOMATICALLY GENERATED EXCERPT
Please rate it.

The editors of this prodigiously ambitious collection of personal essays hint that they strived with some difficulty to extract from their distinguished authors personal views of how psychiatry has developed during the course of the past 50 years... The editors did not want a series of academic reviews but more the experience and wisdom gleaned during successful careers... Every practising psychiatrist and trainee should read this book... I did not just read it, I devoured it, but readers beware, I put down the finished book with a disturbing sense of disappointment... The perennial indecisiveness about the boundaries of psychiatry’s responsibilities, the repeated creation of social movements that ultimately fail to shift patients’ life chances, the deficiency in translating what we know from social psychiatric studies into practical treatment modalities, the ever-shifting ethical sands of risk and restraint and the almost total lack of significant improvement in medications after imipramine in 1940 and clozapine in the 1960s, all this makes disturbing reading... Yet many essays contain scholarly reviews of fruitful paths of research that have not quite yielded success yet, such as Peter McGuffin on genetics, Steven Hyman on neuroscience, Edwin Harari on personality disorders... I have one criticism and this is not of the authors or editors... Oxford University Press should surely have produced this book in a better-quality format... It is printed in a small font (although not as small as this journal!) and the cover is somewhere between dull and unfathomable; it looks cheap... A tome so rich in content deserves a more sumptuous coat.

No MeSH data available.