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Cancer cell classification with coherent diffraction imaging using an extreme ultraviolet radiation source.

Zürch M, Foertsch S, Matzas M, Pachmann K, Kuth R, Spielmann C - J Med Imaging (Bellingham) (2014)

Bottom Line: Here, we present an innovative approach for rapidly classifying different cell types: we measure the diffraction pattern of a single cell illuminated with coherent extreme ultraviolet (XUV) laser-generated radiation.Moreover, the morphology of the object can be retrieved from the diffraction pattern with submicron resolution.With the resulting diffraction pattern, we could clearly identify the different cell types.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena , Institute of Optics and Quantum Electronics, Abbe Center of Photonics, Max-Wien-Platz 1, Jena 07743, Germany.

ABSTRACT
In cancer treatment, it is highly desirable to classify single cancer cells in real time. The standard method is polymerase chain reaction requiring a substantial amount of resources and time. Here, we present an innovative approach for rapidly classifying different cell types: we measure the diffraction pattern of a single cell illuminated with coherent extreme ultraviolet (XUV) laser-generated radiation. These patterns allow distinguishing different breast cancer cell types in a subsequent step. Moreover, the morphology of the object can be retrieved from the diffraction pattern with submicron resolution. In a proof-of-principle experiment, we prepared single MCF7 and SKBR3 breast cancer cells on gold-coated silica slides. The output of a laser-driven XUV light source is focused onto a single unstained and unlabeled cancer cell. With the resulting diffraction pattern, we could clearly identify the different cell types. With an improved setup, it will not only be feasible to classify circulating tumor cells with a high throughput, but also to identify smaller objects such as bacteria or even viruses.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Light microscope image after the phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) buffer containing several cancer cells dried out on a gold coated substrate. Adjacent to the MCF7 cells (marked by arrows) salt crystals are clearly visible on the substrate. The scale bar corresponds to .
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f5: Light microscope image after the phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) buffer containing several cancer cells dried out on a gold coated substrate. Adjacent to the MCF7 cells (marked by arrows) salt crystals are clearly visible on the substrate. The scale bar corresponds to .

Mentions: The unstained and unlabeled cells were cultivated in 90% advanced DMEM and 10% FBS with 2-mM Glutamine up to 90% confluency. After trypsinization, cells were washed twice in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS), then they were placed on the substrate using an inverted microscope and a micromanipulator device equipped with a micropipette. As an example, we depict one of the prepared samples containing several MCF7 cells in Fig. 5. After drying the cell, the salt forms small crystalline structures around the cells. As long as they are well separated from the cell, they do not impair the measurements, because the focal spot of the XUV beam is small enough to only illuminate the cell and the diffraction pattern only contains information of the morphology of the cell.


Cancer cell classification with coherent diffraction imaging using an extreme ultraviolet radiation source.

Zürch M, Foertsch S, Matzas M, Pachmann K, Kuth R, Spielmann C - J Med Imaging (Bellingham) (2014)

Light microscope image after the phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) buffer containing several cancer cells dried out on a gold coated substrate. Adjacent to the MCF7 cells (marked by arrows) salt crystals are clearly visible on the substrate. The scale bar corresponds to .
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4478871&req=5

f5: Light microscope image after the phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) buffer containing several cancer cells dried out on a gold coated substrate. Adjacent to the MCF7 cells (marked by arrows) salt crystals are clearly visible on the substrate. The scale bar corresponds to .
Mentions: The unstained and unlabeled cells were cultivated in 90% advanced DMEM and 10% FBS with 2-mM Glutamine up to 90% confluency. After trypsinization, cells were washed twice in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS), then they were placed on the substrate using an inverted microscope and a micromanipulator device equipped with a micropipette. As an example, we depict one of the prepared samples containing several MCF7 cells in Fig. 5. After drying the cell, the salt forms small crystalline structures around the cells. As long as they are well separated from the cell, they do not impair the measurements, because the focal spot of the XUV beam is small enough to only illuminate the cell and the diffraction pattern only contains information of the morphology of the cell.

Bottom Line: Here, we present an innovative approach for rapidly classifying different cell types: we measure the diffraction pattern of a single cell illuminated with coherent extreme ultraviolet (XUV) laser-generated radiation.Moreover, the morphology of the object can be retrieved from the diffraction pattern with submicron resolution.With the resulting diffraction pattern, we could clearly identify the different cell types.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena , Institute of Optics and Quantum Electronics, Abbe Center of Photonics, Max-Wien-Platz 1, Jena 07743, Germany.

ABSTRACT
In cancer treatment, it is highly desirable to classify single cancer cells in real time. The standard method is polymerase chain reaction requiring a substantial amount of resources and time. Here, we present an innovative approach for rapidly classifying different cell types: we measure the diffraction pattern of a single cell illuminated with coherent extreme ultraviolet (XUV) laser-generated radiation. These patterns allow distinguishing different breast cancer cell types in a subsequent step. Moreover, the morphology of the object can be retrieved from the diffraction pattern with submicron resolution. In a proof-of-principle experiment, we prepared single MCF7 and SKBR3 breast cancer cells on gold-coated silica slides. The output of a laser-driven XUV light source is focused onto a single unstained and unlabeled cancer cell. With the resulting diffraction pattern, we could clearly identify the different cell types. With an improved setup, it will not only be feasible to classify circulating tumor cells with a high throughput, but also to identify smaller objects such as bacteria or even viruses.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus