Limits...
Muscle relaxant or prone position, which one unfastened the entrapped epidural catheter?

Zanjani AP, Mirzashahi B, Emami A, Hassani M - Saudi J Anaesth (2015 Jul-Sep)

Bottom Line: When we found that the inserted epidural catheter was entrapped, we performed all recommended noninvasive maneuvers to release the catheter, but no progress was achieved.The authors believe, in this process, it would have been better if they had tried pulling the catheter in a prone position as a preliminary step.Furthermore, pulling the catheter in a prone position after injecting a muscle relaxant appeared to be more effective and saved the patient from the scheduled surgery.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Anesthesiology and Intensive Care, Imam Khomeini Hospital Complex, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.

ABSTRACT
Some nonsurgical steps have been introduced to remove an entrapped catheter. But occasionally, the majority of them fail, and we are forced to extract the catheter through an invasive procedure. This article depicts our team's experience on the issue. When we found that the inserted epidural catheter was entrapped, we performed all recommended noninvasive maneuvers to release the catheter, but no progress was achieved. Therefore, after obtaining informed consent, we induced anesthesia and changed her to a prone position to explore her back. The intact catheter was removed easily in this stage. The authors believe, in this process, it would have been better if they had tried pulling the catheter in a prone position as a preliminary step. Furthermore, pulling the catheter in a prone position after injecting a muscle relaxant appeared to be more effective and saved the patient from the scheduled surgery.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Anteroposterior (left) and lateral (right) X-rays illustrating the catheter
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4478830&req=5

Figure 1: Anteroposterior (left) and lateral (right) X-rays illustrating the catheter

Mentions: Next, we paved the same way while injecting the saline into the catheter, and then we repeated the task 10 min after administering 5 mg intravenous diazepam, but both were unsuccessful. We took anterioposterior and lateral X-rays to monitor the catheter and the tip [Figure 1]. Because the tip was not clear in plain X-ray studies, we did not insert a guide wire into the catheter.


Muscle relaxant or prone position, which one unfastened the entrapped epidural catheter?

Zanjani AP, Mirzashahi B, Emami A, Hassani M - Saudi J Anaesth (2015 Jul-Sep)

Anteroposterior (left) and lateral (right) X-rays illustrating the catheter
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4478830&req=5

Figure 1: Anteroposterior (left) and lateral (right) X-rays illustrating the catheter
Mentions: Next, we paved the same way while injecting the saline into the catheter, and then we repeated the task 10 min after administering 5 mg intravenous diazepam, but both were unsuccessful. We took anterioposterior and lateral X-rays to monitor the catheter and the tip [Figure 1]. Because the tip was not clear in plain X-ray studies, we did not insert a guide wire into the catheter.

Bottom Line: When we found that the inserted epidural catheter was entrapped, we performed all recommended noninvasive maneuvers to release the catheter, but no progress was achieved.The authors believe, in this process, it would have been better if they had tried pulling the catheter in a prone position as a preliminary step.Furthermore, pulling the catheter in a prone position after injecting a muscle relaxant appeared to be more effective and saved the patient from the scheduled surgery.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Anesthesiology and Intensive Care, Imam Khomeini Hospital Complex, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.

ABSTRACT
Some nonsurgical steps have been introduced to remove an entrapped catheter. But occasionally, the majority of them fail, and we are forced to extract the catheter through an invasive procedure. This article depicts our team's experience on the issue. When we found that the inserted epidural catheter was entrapped, we performed all recommended noninvasive maneuvers to release the catheter, but no progress was achieved. Therefore, after obtaining informed consent, we induced anesthesia and changed her to a prone position to explore her back. The intact catheter was removed easily in this stage. The authors believe, in this process, it would have been better if they had tried pulling the catheter in a prone position as a preliminary step. Furthermore, pulling the catheter in a prone position after injecting a muscle relaxant appeared to be more effective and saved the patient from the scheduled surgery.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus