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Context-sensitive half-time of fentanyl in dogs.

Iizuka T, Nishimura R - J. Vet. Med. Sci. (2015)

Bottom Line: Context-sensitive half-times (CSHTs) of fentanyl in dogs were determined using pharmacokinetic models reported by Murphy et al. and Sano et al., and compared with a human model.The CSHT was defined as the time required for a 50% decrease in drug concentration in the central compartment after the termination of infusion.The CSHTs of fentanyl in dogs are apparently shorter than those in humans; therefore, a continuous infusion of fentanyl may be a rational regimen in dogs, even if duration of infusion is extended.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Laboratory of Veterinary Surgery, Graduate School of Agricultural and Life Sciences, The University of Tokyo, 1-1-1 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8657, Japan.

ABSTRACT
Context-sensitive half-times (CSHTs) of fentanyl in dogs were determined using pharmacokinetic models reported by Murphy et al. and Sano et al., and compared with a human model. The CSHT was defined as the time required for a 50% decrease in drug concentration in the central compartment after the termination of infusion. Although CSHTs increased gradually as the infusion time increased, the CSHTs in dogs were shorter than those in humans. The CSHTs at steady-state were 31.3 and 69.2 min in dogs, and 306.5 min in humans. The CSHTs of fentanyl in dogs are apparently shorter than those in humans; therefore, a continuous infusion of fentanyl may be a rational regimen in dogs, even if duration of infusion is extended.

No MeSH data available.


Context-sensitive half-times (CSHTs) of fentanyl in dogs and humans by simulatingBET-type infusions for 1 to 600 min. Solid and broken lines are the CSHT obtained fromMurphy and Sano models [8, 10], respectively. Dashed line is the CSHT obtained from Scott &Stanski model [12]. The changes in CSHT in dogs(Murphy and Sano models) are small, and steady-state is reached when the infusion timeexceeded 2–4 hr. In contrast, the CSHT in humans (Scott & Stanski model)substantially increases particularly with infusion times of 2 hr or more.
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fig_001: Context-sensitive half-times (CSHTs) of fentanyl in dogs and humans by simulatingBET-type infusions for 1 to 600 min. Solid and broken lines are the CSHT obtained fromMurphy and Sano models [8, 10], respectively. Dashed line is the CSHT obtained from Scott &Stanski model [12]. The changes in CSHT in dogs(Murphy and Sano models) are small, and steady-state is reached when the infusion timeexceeded 2–4 hr. In contrast, the CSHT in humans (Scott & Stanski model)substantially increases particularly with infusion times of 2 hr or more.

Mentions: Figure 1Fig. 1.


Context-sensitive half-time of fentanyl in dogs.

Iizuka T, Nishimura R - J. Vet. Med. Sci. (2015)

Context-sensitive half-times (CSHTs) of fentanyl in dogs and humans by simulatingBET-type infusions for 1 to 600 min. Solid and broken lines are the CSHT obtained fromMurphy and Sano models [8, 10], respectively. Dashed line is the CSHT obtained from Scott &Stanski model [12]. The changes in CSHT in dogs(Murphy and Sano models) are small, and steady-state is reached when the infusion timeexceeded 2–4 hr. In contrast, the CSHT in humans (Scott & Stanski model)substantially increases particularly with infusion times of 2 hr or more.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4478745&req=5

fig_001: Context-sensitive half-times (CSHTs) of fentanyl in dogs and humans by simulatingBET-type infusions for 1 to 600 min. Solid and broken lines are the CSHT obtained fromMurphy and Sano models [8, 10], respectively. Dashed line is the CSHT obtained from Scott &Stanski model [12]. The changes in CSHT in dogs(Murphy and Sano models) are small, and steady-state is reached when the infusion timeexceeded 2–4 hr. In contrast, the CSHT in humans (Scott & Stanski model)substantially increases particularly with infusion times of 2 hr or more.
Mentions: Figure 1Fig. 1.

Bottom Line: Context-sensitive half-times (CSHTs) of fentanyl in dogs were determined using pharmacokinetic models reported by Murphy et al. and Sano et al., and compared with a human model.The CSHT was defined as the time required for a 50% decrease in drug concentration in the central compartment after the termination of infusion.The CSHTs of fentanyl in dogs are apparently shorter than those in humans; therefore, a continuous infusion of fentanyl may be a rational regimen in dogs, even if duration of infusion is extended.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Laboratory of Veterinary Surgery, Graduate School of Agricultural and Life Sciences, The University of Tokyo, 1-1-1 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8657, Japan.

ABSTRACT
Context-sensitive half-times (CSHTs) of fentanyl in dogs were determined using pharmacokinetic models reported by Murphy et al. and Sano et al., and compared with a human model. The CSHT was defined as the time required for a 50% decrease in drug concentration in the central compartment after the termination of infusion. Although CSHTs increased gradually as the infusion time increased, the CSHTs in dogs were shorter than those in humans. The CSHTs at steady-state were 31.3 and 69.2 min in dogs, and 306.5 min in humans. The CSHTs of fentanyl in dogs are apparently shorter than those in humans; therefore, a continuous infusion of fentanyl may be a rational regimen in dogs, even if duration of infusion is extended.

No MeSH data available.