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Sarcoptic mange in captive maras: the first known outbreak and complete recovery with colony-wide acaricide treatment.

Kim KT, Lee SH, Kwak D - J. Vet. Med. Sci. (2015)

Bottom Line: Among 16 maras housed as a colony at a zoo, 2 initially showed generalized dermal lesions on the legs, head and abdomen.The mites were highly mobile and abundant in all cases, and no other causative agents were detected.Colony-wide treatment with ivermectin and prednisolone was administered weekly for a total of 4 treatments.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Animal Health Center of Zoo Land, Daejeon O-World Theme Park, Daejeon 301-212, Korea.

ABSTRACT
Among 16 maras housed as a colony at a zoo, 2 initially showed generalized dermal lesions on the legs, head and abdomen. Approximately 1 month later, following completion of therapy with amitraz, 6 maras in the same colony, including the 2 previously diseased animals, showed dermal lesions with severe alopecia and crusting. Sarcoptic mange was diagnosed on skin scrapings on the basis of morphological criteria. The mites were highly mobile and abundant in all cases, and no other causative agents were detected. Colony-wide treatment with ivermectin and prednisolone was administered weekly for a total of 4 treatments. After therapy was completed in all cohabitants, follow-up scrapings were negative for Sarcoptes scabiei. This report describes the first known outbreak of sarcoptic mange in captive maras and successful treatment with acaricides.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Gross appearance of dermal lesions in maras (Dolichotis patagonum)housed in a colony at a zoo before and after treatment. Skin lesions were observed onthe legs (A, arrows; D), muzzle (B) and abdomen (C) of multiple animals.
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fig_001: Gross appearance of dermal lesions in maras (Dolichotis patagonum)housed in a colony at a zoo before and after treatment. Skin lesions were observed onthe legs (A, arrows; D), muzzle (B) and abdomen (C) of multiple animals.

Mentions: Since 2002, 16 maras have ranged freely as a colony at O-World Zoo (36°17ʹ19.00ʺ N,127°23ʹ52.04ʺ E), Daejeon, Korea. Originally, 10 maras were introduced to the zoo from theNetherlands in 2002. Since then, the number of maras has increased to 16, and the animalsappeared healthy until the reported outbreak. In September 2012, 2 maras (both females, 5years of age) showed generalized dermal lesions: patchy alopecia on the legs, abdomen andmuzzle; sparse erythematous eruptions with papules; seborrhea; lichenification; thickened skinand thick crusted lesions (Fig. 1A–1DFig. 1.


Sarcoptic mange in captive maras: the first known outbreak and complete recovery with colony-wide acaricide treatment.

Kim KT, Lee SH, Kwak D - J. Vet. Med. Sci. (2015)

Gross appearance of dermal lesions in maras (Dolichotis patagonum)housed in a colony at a zoo before and after treatment. Skin lesions were observed onthe legs (A, arrows; D), muzzle (B) and abdomen (C) of multiple animals.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4478740&req=5

fig_001: Gross appearance of dermal lesions in maras (Dolichotis patagonum)housed in a colony at a zoo before and after treatment. Skin lesions were observed onthe legs (A, arrows; D), muzzle (B) and abdomen (C) of multiple animals.
Mentions: Since 2002, 16 maras have ranged freely as a colony at O-World Zoo (36°17ʹ19.00ʺ N,127°23ʹ52.04ʺ E), Daejeon, Korea. Originally, 10 maras were introduced to the zoo from theNetherlands in 2002. Since then, the number of maras has increased to 16, and the animalsappeared healthy until the reported outbreak. In September 2012, 2 maras (both females, 5years of age) showed generalized dermal lesions: patchy alopecia on the legs, abdomen andmuzzle; sparse erythematous eruptions with papules; seborrhea; lichenification; thickened skinand thick crusted lesions (Fig. 1A–1DFig. 1.

Bottom Line: Among 16 maras housed as a colony at a zoo, 2 initially showed generalized dermal lesions on the legs, head and abdomen.The mites were highly mobile and abundant in all cases, and no other causative agents were detected.Colony-wide treatment with ivermectin and prednisolone was administered weekly for a total of 4 treatments.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Animal Health Center of Zoo Land, Daejeon O-World Theme Park, Daejeon 301-212, Korea.

ABSTRACT
Among 16 maras housed as a colony at a zoo, 2 initially showed generalized dermal lesions on the legs, head and abdomen. Approximately 1 month later, following completion of therapy with amitraz, 6 maras in the same colony, including the 2 previously diseased animals, showed dermal lesions with severe alopecia and crusting. Sarcoptic mange was diagnosed on skin scrapings on the basis of morphological criteria. The mites were highly mobile and abundant in all cases, and no other causative agents were detected. Colony-wide treatment with ivermectin and prednisolone was administered weekly for a total of 4 treatments. After therapy was completed in all cohabitants, follow-up scrapings were negative for Sarcoptes scabiei. This report describes the first known outbreak of sarcoptic mange in captive maras and successful treatment with acaricides.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus