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Catheter associated mycobacteremia: Opening new fronts in infection control.

Rathor N, Khillan V, Panda D - Indian J Crit Care Med (2015)

Bottom Line: Mycobacterium fortuitum is a rapidly growing Mycobacterium ubiquitous in nature, known to form biofilms.This property increases its propensity to colonize the in situ central line and makes it a prospective threat for nosocomial infection.We report a case of 48-year-old female with carcinoma cecum who reported to us with clinical illness and neutropenia while on chemotherapy via totally implanted central venous device, postlaparoscopic-assisted right hemicolectomy.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Microbiology, Institute of Liver and Microbiology, Vasant Kunj, New Delhi, India.

ABSTRACT
Mycobacterium fortuitum is a rapidly growing Mycobacterium ubiquitous in nature, known to form biofilms. This property increases its propensity to colonize the in situ central line and makes it a prospective threat for nosocomial infection. We report a case of 48-year-old female with carcinoma cecum who reported to us with clinical illness and neutropenia while on chemotherapy via totally implanted central venous device, postlaparoscopic-assisted right hemicolectomy.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Gram-stain from blood culture
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Figure 1: Gram-stain from blood culture

Mentions: Blood cultures were also sent, on 4th day the blood sample which was taken from the chemo port flashed positive in BacTAlert, a Gram-stain revealed irregularly staining Gram-positive bacilli [Figure 1]. An Erlich-Ziehl-Neelsen stain was done, and acid-fast bacilli were seen [Figure 2]. Subcultures were done on blood agar, MacConkey agar without crystal violet, LJ media, Middlebrook 7H9 broth in mycobacteria growth indicator tube.


Catheter associated mycobacteremia: Opening new fronts in infection control.

Rathor N, Khillan V, Panda D - Indian J Crit Care Med (2015)

Gram-stain from blood culture
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4478676&req=5

Figure 1: Gram-stain from blood culture
Mentions: Blood cultures were also sent, on 4th day the blood sample which was taken from the chemo port flashed positive in BacTAlert, a Gram-stain revealed irregularly staining Gram-positive bacilli [Figure 1]. An Erlich-Ziehl-Neelsen stain was done, and acid-fast bacilli were seen [Figure 2]. Subcultures were done on blood agar, MacConkey agar without crystal violet, LJ media, Middlebrook 7H9 broth in mycobacteria growth indicator tube.

Bottom Line: Mycobacterium fortuitum is a rapidly growing Mycobacterium ubiquitous in nature, known to form biofilms.This property increases its propensity to colonize the in situ central line and makes it a prospective threat for nosocomial infection.We report a case of 48-year-old female with carcinoma cecum who reported to us with clinical illness and neutropenia while on chemotherapy via totally implanted central venous device, postlaparoscopic-assisted right hemicolectomy.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Microbiology, Institute of Liver and Microbiology, Vasant Kunj, New Delhi, India.

ABSTRACT
Mycobacterium fortuitum is a rapidly growing Mycobacterium ubiquitous in nature, known to form biofilms. This property increases its propensity to colonize the in situ central line and makes it a prospective threat for nosocomial infection. We report a case of 48-year-old female with carcinoma cecum who reported to us with clinical illness and neutropenia while on chemotherapy via totally implanted central venous device, postlaparoscopic-assisted right hemicolectomy.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus