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The use of a biological graft for the closure of large abdominal wall defects following excision of soft tissue tumours.

Illingworth E, Rooney PS, Heath R, Chandrasekar CR - J Surg Case Rep (2015)

Bottom Line: Currently, synthetic material such as polypropylene mesh is a common choice for closure of abdominal wall defects after tumour excision.There was no evidence of infection, recurrence, seroma or hernias at 2-year follow-up.Following excision of soft tissue tumours of the abdominal wall, biological reconstructions can be successfully used to bridge the defect with minimal morbidity.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Royal Liverpool and Broadgreen University Hospitals NHS Trust, Liverpool, UK.

No MeSH data available.


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Twelve-month postoperative MRI.
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RJV063F3: Twelve-month postoperative MRI.

Mentions: A 43-year-old Caucasian female presented to her General Practitioner in April 2012 with a 2-year history of a firm, painful swelling in the right flank. MRI revealed a 5.0 × 6.0 × 7.0 cm enhancing lesion with areas of necrosis, which was invading the antero-lateral abdominal wall (Fig. 1 ). With radiological features highly suggestive of a sarcoma, she underwent an ultrasound-guided biopsy, which classified the mass as a borderline myoepithelial tumour. The patient underwent an uncomplicated resection of the mass, which left a 10 × 10 cm right-sided antero-lateral abdominal wall defect. The defect was repaired using a Biodesign® biological graft. Initially, a layer of the biological mesh was used to cover the intact peritoneum with attachments cranially to the ribs and inferiorly to the right iliac crest. The external oblique was mobilized to partially cover the mesh, and a further layer of the biological mesh attached over it with Ethilon™ (Fig. 2). The patient had an uncomplicated postoperative recovery. The tumour histology revealed a 6.5 × 6.0 × 5.5 cm myxoid mass; immunohistochemistry analysis favoured a benign/borderline myofibroblastic tumour. At 24-month follow-up, she had good wound healing with a small area of paraesthesia inferior to the scar. An MRI showed good graft incorporation and no evidence of disease recurrence or hernia (Fig. 3).Figure 1:


The use of a biological graft for the closure of large abdominal wall defects following excision of soft tissue tumours.

Illingworth E, Rooney PS, Heath R, Chandrasekar CR - J Surg Case Rep (2015)

Twelve-month postoperative MRI.
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4478465&req=5

RJV063F3: Twelve-month postoperative MRI.
Mentions: A 43-year-old Caucasian female presented to her General Practitioner in April 2012 with a 2-year history of a firm, painful swelling in the right flank. MRI revealed a 5.0 × 6.0 × 7.0 cm enhancing lesion with areas of necrosis, which was invading the antero-lateral abdominal wall (Fig. 1 ). With radiological features highly suggestive of a sarcoma, she underwent an ultrasound-guided biopsy, which classified the mass as a borderline myoepithelial tumour. The patient underwent an uncomplicated resection of the mass, which left a 10 × 10 cm right-sided antero-lateral abdominal wall defect. The defect was repaired using a Biodesign® biological graft. Initially, a layer of the biological mesh was used to cover the intact peritoneum with attachments cranially to the ribs and inferiorly to the right iliac crest. The external oblique was mobilized to partially cover the mesh, and a further layer of the biological mesh attached over it with Ethilon™ (Fig. 2). The patient had an uncomplicated postoperative recovery. The tumour histology revealed a 6.5 × 6.0 × 5.5 cm myxoid mass; immunohistochemistry analysis favoured a benign/borderline myofibroblastic tumour. At 24-month follow-up, she had good wound healing with a small area of paraesthesia inferior to the scar. An MRI showed good graft incorporation and no evidence of disease recurrence or hernia (Fig. 3).Figure 1:

Bottom Line: Currently, synthetic material such as polypropylene mesh is a common choice for closure of abdominal wall defects after tumour excision.There was no evidence of infection, recurrence, seroma or hernias at 2-year follow-up.Following excision of soft tissue tumours of the abdominal wall, biological reconstructions can be successfully used to bridge the defect with minimal morbidity.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Royal Liverpool and Broadgreen University Hospitals NHS Trust, Liverpool, UK.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus