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Quantitative evaluation of toothbrush and arm-joint motion during tooth brushing.

Inada E, Saitoh I, Yu Y, Tomiyama D, Murakami D, Takemoto Y, Morizono K, Iwasaki T, Iwase Y, Yamasaki Y - Clin Oral Investig (2014)

Bottom Line: The frequencies and power spectra of toothbrush motion and joint angles of the shoulder, elbow, and wrist were calculated and analyzed statistically.The frequency of toothbrush motion was higher on the left side (both buccal and palatal areas) than on the right side.The elbow generated an individual's frequency through a stabilizing movement.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Pediatric Dentistry, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima, 890-8544, Japan.

ABSTRACT

Objectives: It is very difficult for dental professionals to objectively assess tooth brushing skill of patients, because an obvious index to assess the brushing motion of patients has not been established. The purpose of this study was to quantitatively evaluate toothbrush and arm-joint motion during tooth brushing.

Materials and methods: Tooth brushing motion, performed by dental hygienists for 15 s, was captured using a motion-capture system that continuously calculates the three-dimensional coordinates of object's motion relative to the floor. The dental hygienists performed the tooth brushing on the buccal and palatal sides of their right and left upper molars. The frequencies and power spectra of toothbrush motion and joint angles of the shoulder, elbow, and wrist were calculated and analyzed statistically.

Results: The frequency of toothbrush motion was higher on the left side (both buccal and palatal areas) than on the right side. There were no significant differences among joint angle frequencies within each brushing area. The inter- and intra-individual variations of the power spectrum of the elbow flexion angle when brushing were smaller than for any of the other angles.

Conclusions: This study quantitatively confirmed that dental hygienists have individual distinctive rhythms during tooth brushing. All arm joints moved synchronously during brushing, and tooth brushing motion was controlled by coordinated movement of the joints. The elbow generated an individual's frequency through a stabilizing movement.

Clinical relevance: The shoulder and wrist control the hand motion, and the elbow generates the cyclic rhythm during tooth brushing.

No MeSH data available.


Motion-capture system
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Fig1: Motion-capture system

Mentions: The Vicon systemⓇ (Inter-Reha Co. Ltd., Tokyo, Japan) was used as an optical 3-D motion analyzer. Light-reflective balls were attached to the skin of each subject, and these markers’ motion was tracked with six charge-coupled device (CCD) cameras and visualized on a computer display (Fig. 1). Six CCD cameras were placed 1 m away from each subject, with four cameras (1, 2, 4, 5) placed at a height of 1 m, and the remaining cameras (3, 6) placed at a height of 0.5 m (Fig. 2). The markers’ 3-D coordinates were tabulated at 100 Hz.Fig. 1


Quantitative evaluation of toothbrush and arm-joint motion during tooth brushing.

Inada E, Saitoh I, Yu Y, Tomiyama D, Murakami D, Takemoto Y, Morizono K, Iwasaki T, Iwase Y, Yamasaki Y - Clin Oral Investig (2014)

Motion-capture system
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4478439&req=5

Fig1: Motion-capture system
Mentions: The Vicon systemⓇ (Inter-Reha Co. Ltd., Tokyo, Japan) was used as an optical 3-D motion analyzer. Light-reflective balls were attached to the skin of each subject, and these markers’ motion was tracked with six charge-coupled device (CCD) cameras and visualized on a computer display (Fig. 1). Six CCD cameras were placed 1 m away from each subject, with four cameras (1, 2, 4, 5) placed at a height of 1 m, and the remaining cameras (3, 6) placed at a height of 0.5 m (Fig. 2). The markers’ 3-D coordinates were tabulated at 100 Hz.Fig. 1

Bottom Line: The frequencies and power spectra of toothbrush motion and joint angles of the shoulder, elbow, and wrist were calculated and analyzed statistically.The frequency of toothbrush motion was higher on the left side (both buccal and palatal areas) than on the right side.The elbow generated an individual's frequency through a stabilizing movement.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Pediatric Dentistry, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima, 890-8544, Japan.

ABSTRACT

Objectives: It is very difficult for dental professionals to objectively assess tooth brushing skill of patients, because an obvious index to assess the brushing motion of patients has not been established. The purpose of this study was to quantitatively evaluate toothbrush and arm-joint motion during tooth brushing.

Materials and methods: Tooth brushing motion, performed by dental hygienists for 15 s, was captured using a motion-capture system that continuously calculates the three-dimensional coordinates of object's motion relative to the floor. The dental hygienists performed the tooth brushing on the buccal and palatal sides of their right and left upper molars. The frequencies and power spectra of toothbrush motion and joint angles of the shoulder, elbow, and wrist were calculated and analyzed statistically.

Results: The frequency of toothbrush motion was higher on the left side (both buccal and palatal areas) than on the right side. There were no significant differences among joint angle frequencies within each brushing area. The inter- and intra-individual variations of the power spectrum of the elbow flexion angle when brushing were smaller than for any of the other angles.

Conclusions: This study quantitatively confirmed that dental hygienists have individual distinctive rhythms during tooth brushing. All arm joints moved synchronously during brushing, and tooth brushing motion was controlled by coordinated movement of the joints. The elbow generated an individual's frequency through a stabilizing movement.

Clinical relevance: The shoulder and wrist control the hand motion, and the elbow generates the cyclic rhythm during tooth brushing.

No MeSH data available.